Pardon Me – Another Damn Impeachment Show

Connecticut Public Radio

Does the Trump impeachment drama feel like drinking from a fire hose? If so, join host Colin McEnroe, public radio personality and columnist, for an energetic weekly round-up that brings you the latest developments and perspectives from guests like Dave Eggers, Adam Gopnik, Emily Bazelon and Dahlia Lithwick among other journalists, novelists, ethicists, essayists and podiatrists.*

"Pardon Me" also airs on Connecticut Public Radio Saturdays at noon.

Not to be confused with a podcast of a similar name, Colin may do occasional kettlebell workouts, but they won’t be a big part of the show. And make sure you are not actually drinking from a fire hose, because that’s very dangerous.

*Only if Gordon Sondland develops specific foot ailments.


There Is No January Exception.
Feb 13 2021
There Is No January Exception.
Donald Trump's legal team delivered their defense of the former president Friday. They followed a tightly argued and visceral presentation delivered by House managers that, some say, has made it easy for Republican senators to convict Trump. They likely won't. We wondered if our show, recorded in part on Thursday, would omit important events that occurred thereafter. Given that many Republican senators have already decided to acquit, why would the defense feel the need to address the 144 constitutional lawyers who debunked their First Amendment argument, the 150 constitutional lawyers who say the impeachment of Trump is constitutional, or the people of this country? We knew the ending before it even began. GUESTS: Dahlia Lithwick - Writes about the courts and the law for Slate and hosts the podcast AmicusSascha Paruk - Lead oddsmaker and editor at Sports Betting DimeRobyn Walsh - Assistant professor of the New Testament and early Christianity at the University of Miami and the author of The Origins of Early Christian Literature: Contextualizing the New Testament within Greco-Roman Literary CultureChion Wolf - The host of Audacious with Chion Wolf on Connecticut Public RadioBill Yousman - Professor of media studies at Sacred Heart University Cat Pastor contributed to this show. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio.Support the show: omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Impeached! Or: We Love You. You're Very Special. Go Home.
Jan 15 2021
Impeached! Or: We Love You. You're Very Special. Go Home.
Previously on Pardon Me (Another Damn Impeachment Show?): House Democrats voted to impeach President Trump on two Articles of Impeachment: "abuse of power" and "obstruction of Congress." He was later acquitted promptly after Senate Republicans voted against calling witnesses or admitting new evidence. Now (less than 48 weeks later), on Season Two of Pardon Me: House Democrats, along with 10 Republicans, voted to impeach President Trump Wednesday on one Article of Impeachment: "incitement of insurrection." Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., promptly responded that there'll be no trial while he's Senate leader. The more things change, the more they stay the same. This hour, we talk about the constitutional gray zone of impeaching a president no longer in office, co-opting historically significant language, and a musical response to this political moment. And, we bring back Factoids with Chion Wolf. GUESTS: Joanne Freeman - The Class of 1954 Professor of History & American Studies at Yale University and the co-host of the American History podcast Backstory; her most recent book is The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil WarMichael Gerhardt - The Burton Craige University Distinguished Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of North Carolina School of Law in Chapel Hill and the author of seven books; his most recent is Lincoln's Mentors: The Education of a LeaderJill Sobule - An award-winning singer, songwriter, and guitarist; her most recent album is Nostalgia KillsChion Wolf - The host of Audacious with Chion Wolf on Connecticut Public Radio Cat Pastor contributed to this show. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio.Support the show: omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Hang On A Minute, Lads. I've Got A Great Idea.
Feb 15 2020
Hang On A Minute, Lads. I've Got A Great Idea.
Four Department of Justice prosecutors working on the case of Roger Stone, a close friend of President Trump, withdrew from legal proceedings Tuesday after Attorney General William Barr overruled their sentencing recommendations. The president had complained about the long sentence. Barr denied that President Trump asked him to intervene and claimed he wouldn't be "bullied or influenced by anybody." He said Thursday that the president should stop tweeting about DOJ criminal cases. The president took to Twitter Friday to say he has the "legal right." Shortly therafter, the DOJ dropped their probe into former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe. Before you think this is more than theater, keep in mind that Barr also set up a process to vet information that Rudy Giuliani is gathering in Ukraine. And he tasked prosecutors to review the case of former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn. This is the last episode of Pardon Me. We think it's fitting to end the series on endings: the end of functioning institutions, the end of trust in government, the end of fact-based reality, the end of freedom for the press -- the end of democracy, itself. We remain hopeful. GUESTS: Frankie Graziano - A reporter at Connecticut Public RadioDavid Plotz - CEO of Atlas Obscura, co-host of the Slate Political GabfestJay Rosen - A media critic and a professor of journalism at NYUPhilip Rucker - White House Bureau Chief at The Washington Post, co-author of A Very Stable Genius: Donald J. Trump's Testing of AmericaChion Wolf - A producer, photographer, and announcer at Connecticut Public Radio Thanks to Catie Talarski and Tim Rasmussen. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio.Support the show: omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Acquitted! Or: Heading Down A Very, Very Dark Corridor
Feb 8 2020
Acquitted! Or: Heading Down A Very, Very Dark Corridor
Note: This episode contains strong language. The Senate acquitted President Trump on both articles of the impeachment. Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, was the only Republican who voted to convict the president on one charge, for "egregious" behavior he believed rose to the level of a "high crime and misdemeanor." President Trump responded with anger. He fumed at his perceived enemies at Thursday's National Prayer Breakfast. They include members of Congress, people on his staff, FBI agents, and even the state of New York. Senate Republicans hoping for a more subdued Trump were wrong. Others knew better. One remains hopeful. This week, Colin speaks with Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., and professor Ryan Goodman about how the fallout from the Senate acquittal of the president could affect the future of the election and the country. Plus: another edition of Factoids with Chion Wolf and impressions from a Connecticut man who attended the House impeachment hearings and the Senate impeachment trial. GUESTS: Ryan Goodman - Founding co-editor-in-chief of Just Security, professor of law at NYU School of Law, and professor of politics and sociology at NYUKyle Knickerbocker - A merchant mariner from Essex, Conn., who went to see the impeachment hearings and trial in person a whole bunch of timesChris Murphy - Democratic U.S. Senator from ConnecticutChion Wolf - A producer, photographer, and announcer at Connecticut Public Radio Thanks to Eugene Amatruda. Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio.Support the show: omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Motion To Call Witnesses Defeated, Or: Poo Pooing On The Pu Pu Platter On Mount Boredom
Feb 1 2020
Motion To Call Witnesses Defeated, Or: Poo Pooing On The Pu Pu Platter On Mount Boredom
The Senate has voted, 51 to 49, not to subpoena witnesses or documents in its impeachment trial of President Trump. Closing arguments are expected on Monday, and a verdict could come next Wednesday afternoon. This week, Colin and The Gist's Mike Pesca puzzle over the Republican strategy and Alan Dershowitz. He's the Trump attorney who argued that the president could engage in a quid pro quo that benefited him personally as long as he believes his reelection is in the public interest. Dershowitz believes the media misunderstood his argument. These are his words. And New York Times TV critic James Poniewozik gets into the impeachment as television. He's not entirely sure democracy will be renewed for another season. Plus: another edition of Factoids with Chion Wolf, and we sent intrepid reporter Frankie Graziano back out into the world to talk to more of the elusive "regular people." GUESTS: Carmen Baskauf - Producer for Where We Live and the occasional host of The Carmen Baskauf Show on Connecticut Public RadioFrankie Graziano - A reporter at Connecticut Public RadioDahlia Lithwick - Writes about the courts and the law for Slate and hosts the podcast AmicusMike Pesca - Host of the Slate daily podcast The GistJames Poniewozik - Chief television critic for The New York Times and the author of Audience of One: Donald Trump, Television, and the Fracturing of AmericaChion Wolf - Producer, photographer, and announcer at Connecticut Public Radio Thanks to Eugene Amatruda. Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio.Support the show: omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
The World's Greatest Deliberative Body Or A Bunch Of Bored White Guys Playing With Fidget Spinners?
Jan 24 2020
The World's Greatest Deliberative Body Or A Bunch Of Bored White Guys Playing With Fidget Spinners?
Chief Justice John Roberts scolded House managers and the President's counsel early Wednesday for using language beneath the dignity of the world's "greatest deliberative body." This, after Senator Susan Collins complained about "unsettling comments" she felt went against Senate rules of decorum. Speaking of decorum, senators played with fidget spinners and did crossword puzzles while House managers made their case for impeachment. Enough of this pettifoggery! This week, Slate's Dahlia Lithwick says we're in a scary race to the bottom in our political conduct; law professor Lara Bazelon implores House managers to appeal directly to voters (senators in "total coordination" with the White House won't listen); and Washington Post correspondent Philip Bump brings us the "Impeachment Polka." Also this hour: the fourth edition of Factoids with Chion Wolf. Please note: The podcast version of this week's episode is fully 66 seconds longer than the radio version, and every one of those 66 seconds is filled with more of The Jay Sekulow Band (which, you'll find, is a real thing). You are welcome. GUESTS: Bruce Ackerman - The Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science at Yale and the author of nineteen booksLara Bazelon - Professor of law at the University of San Francisco School of Law, contributor to Slate and Politico Magazine, and the author of Rectify: The Power of Restorative Justice After Wrongful ConvictionPhilip Bump - A correspondent for The Washington PostRebecca Castellani - A music writer for the Red Hook Star RevueDahlia Lithwick - Writes about the courts and the law for Slate; host of the podcast AmicusChion Wolf - A producer, photographer, and announcer at Connecticut Public Radio Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio.Support the show: omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Benjamin Wittes and Susan Hennessey: Ratification Or Rejection
Jan 20 2020
Benjamin Wittes and Susan Hennessey: Ratification Or Rejection
Benjamin Wittes and Susan Hennessey argue that President Trump has changed the function of the presidency from one of public service to one that serves his personal interests. The President was impeached for withholding aid to Ukraine in exchange for a political investigation into his political rival and obstructing the House investigation into his behavior. The President will likely be acquitted in the Senate. It may be up to voters in November to decide whether to ratify or reject Trump's vision of the presidency. Colin's interview with Benjamin Wittes and Susan Hennessey has been lightly edited for sound but not for time or content. You can hear a significantly shorter version in Episode 7 of Pardon Me (Another Damn Impeachment Show?). GUESTS: Benjamin Wittes - Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, Editor-in-Chief of Lawfare, analyst for MSNBC, and the coauthor of Unmaking the Presidency: Donald Trump's War on the World's Most Powerful OfficeSusan Hennessey - Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institute, Executive editor at Lawfare, analyst for CNN, and the coauthor of Unmaking The Presidency: Donald Trump’s War on the World’s Most Powerful Office Thanks to Catie Talarski and Chion Wolf. Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio.Support the show: omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
The Senate Trial Begins, Or: Impeachment Apprentice
Jan 17 2020
The Senate Trial Begins, Or: Impeachment Apprentice
President Trump fretted this week that White House lawyer Pat Cippolone and personal lawyer Jay Sekulow lacked experience on television. So he added a few TV-ready lawyers to the mix, each with scripted roles to play. This week, Lawfare's Benjamin Wittes and Susan Hennessey argue that President Trump has changed the presidency from one of public service to one that serves his personal interests. Will we ratify his vision or reject it? It may be up to voters to decide. Also this hour: Slate's Stephen Metcalf thinks Trump is a hostage to 1979. Why else would he be obsessed with U.S. embassies and Jimmy Carter? And singer/songwriter Lara Herscovitch proves music is the antidote to our troubled times. GUESTS: Susan Hennessey - Senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, executive editor at Lawfare, analyst for CNN, and the co-author of Unmaking The Presidency: Donald Trump's War on the World's Most Powerful OfficeLara Herscovitch - A singer, songwriter, and poet; former Connecticut state troubadourStephen Metcalf - Host of the Slate Culture Gabfest; he's working on a book about the 1980sBenjamin Wittes - Senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, editor-in-chief of Lawfare, analyst for MSNBC, and the co-author of Unmaking The Presidency: Donald Trump’s War on the World’s Most Powerful Office Thanks to Catie Talarski and Chion Wolf. Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio.Support the show: omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Jim Jordan: The Vice Principal Who Haunts Your Nightmares
Jan 3 2020
Jim Jordan: The Vice Principal Who Haunts Your Nightmares
Professor Michael Gerhardt argues that the impeachment process is legitimate, despite efforts by President Trump and his defenders to deny it. It is the president's conduct that is not normal. Gerhardt was one of four law professors summoned by the House Judiciary Committee in December, to share their legal expertise on whether President Trump's conduct met the legal threshold for impeachment. Three out of four of them believe it did. Also this hour: State Department witness George Kent's bow tie and Rep. Jim Jordan's jacket have their own Twitter accounts. Nancy Pelosi's dagger-like gold pin turned heads on the day she opened up House debate on the president's impeachment. We talk about the fashion semiotics of impeachment. We also bring you more interesting factoids and an essay about the convergence of entertainment and impeachment. GUESTS: Vanessa Friedman - Fashion director and chief fashion critic for The New York TimesMichael Gerhardt - The Burton Craige University Distinguished Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of North Carolina School of Law in Chapel Hill and the author of several books including Impeachment: What Everyone Needs To KnowBill Yousman - Professor of media studies at Sacred Heart UniversityChion Wolf - Producer, photographer, and announcer at Connecticut Public Radio Thanks to Eugene Amatruda. Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio.Support the show: omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Impeached! Or: 55 White Guys Day Drinking
Dec 20 2019
Impeached! Or: 55 White Guys Day Drinking
There's actually some question whether President Trump has officially been impeached, it turns out. In any case, on Wednesday, December 18, the U.S. House of Representatives passed two Articles of Impeachment charging the president with abuse of power and obstruction of congress. On our third full episode, we talk to the founder of Politico about the huge difference a tiny bit of self-control would make to the Trump presidency and a Yale historian about what those crazy founders were thinking when they put impeachment in the Constitution in the first place. Plus: Our first AccuFrankie report from the Target parking lot in New Britain, Conn., and a song performed live in our studios by Nekita Waller, "Big Al" Anderson, Jim Chapdelaine, and The Shinolas. GUESTS: John Berry - A listener and former public school teacherJoanne Freeman - Professor of history and American studies at Yale and the cohost of the podcast BackStoryRoss Garber - Teaches political investigations and impeachment law at Tulane Law School and is a CNN legal analyst; he has represented four governors in impeachment proceedingsFrankie Graziano - A reporter for Connecticut Public RadioJohn Harris - Co-founder of Politico Thanks to Eugene Amatruda and Chion Wolf. Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio.Support the show: omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.