The Eurasian Climate Brief

Eurasian Climate Brief Team

The Eurasian Climate Brief is a new podcast focussing on climate news in the region stretching from Eastern Europe, Russia down to the Caucasus and Central Asia. It aims to give a voice to the best experts and journalists, enabling them to make sense of a part of the world where environmental news is seriously underreported. The podcast is set to launch in late October when we'll be releasing three episodes per week to coincide with COP26. Following the closure of the conference, a regular episode of The Eurasian Climate Brief will be released every fortnight so make sure you follow the show. This podcast is supported by n-ost, The Moscow Times and The European Climate Foundation. read less

2022's top Eurasian climate stories in review
Jan 2 2023
2022's top Eurasian climate stories in review
The Eurasian Climate Brief team gets together to look back on the top climate stories that have taken place during 2022 across Eastern Europe, Russia, the Caucasus and Central Asia. From to the consequences of Russia's war in Ukraine for the global energy market and climate movement, to the hopeful rise of Ukrainian climate activism and low-carbon strategies in Central Asia, join us for unique analysis of the region's trends and what they might hold in store for the year ahead.The Eurasian Climate Brief is a podcast dedicated to climate issues in the region stretching from Eastern Europe to Russia down to the Caucasus and Central Asia.This episode is supported by n-ost, The Moscow Times and the European Climate Foundation, and made by:Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and English-language editor for The Conversation.  A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.Boris Schneider, European Journalism Project Manager at Clean Energy Wire (CLEW). Prior he has worked as a specialist on Eastern European climate and energy topics, amongst others for n-ost and the German Economic Team. He graduated from the Free University of Berlin with a M. Sc. in Economics and is interested in the intersection of political economy and ecology in Eurasia.Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting. Angelina left Russia in March 2022 and is now a fellow of the journalistic programme Media in Cooperation and Transition (MICT) in Berlin.Production by the www.thepodcastcoach.co.uk
COP27 wrap-up & the power of Ukrainian climate activism
Dec 5 2022
COP27 wrap-up & the power of Ukrainian climate activism
A little more than two weeks after the end of COP27, the Eurasian Climate Brief team takes stock on what the summit in Sharm El-Cheikh has achieved, and where it fell short: How significant is the deal on the ‘loss and damage’ fund, aimed at compensating developing countries for irreversible climate impacts? And what progress has made, if any, in the fight to phase out fossil fuels? Needless to say that all of this is to be read against the background of the Russian attack on Ukraine, the terrible consequences of which influenced much of this conference.We discuss this with Svitlana Romanko, an environmental lawyer and the founder of the Ukrainian NGO Razom We Stand. Svitlana will also brief us on her powerful protests and campaigns in the past months, from calls for a total ban on Russian fossil fuels imports to confrontations with Total’s CEO and Russian delegates.To find out more about Razom We stand, visit https://razomwestand.org/en.The Eurasian Climate Brief is a podcast dedicated to climate issues in the region stretching from Eastern Europe to Russia down to the Caucasus and Central Asia.This episode is supported by n-ost, The Moscow Times and the European Climate Foundation, and made by:Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and English-language editor for The Conversation.  A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.Boris Schneider, European Journalism Project Manager at Clean Energy Wire (CLEW). Prior he has worked as a specialist on Eastern European climate and energy topics, amongst others for n-ost and the German Economic Team. He graduated from the Free University of Berlin with a M. Sc. in Economics and is interested in the intersection of political economy and ecology in Eurasia.Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting. Angelina left Russia in March 2022 and is now a fellow of the journalistic programme Media in Cooperation and Transition (MICT) in Berlin.Production by the www.thepodcastcoach.co.uk
COP27: what's left of Russian climate action?
Nov 18 2022
COP27: what's left of Russian climate action?
As COP27 draws to a close, we take another deep dive into the impacts of Russia’s war against Ukraine on the climate negotiations and climate action at large. What were Moscow's priorities this year? How has the Russian delegation been treated by the rest of the climate community throughout the summit? Maria Pastukhova, a senior policy analyst at the climate think tank E3G, and Anna Korppoo, a research professor from the Fridtjof Nansens Institute in Norway, discuss these questions, and much more.The Eurasian Climate Brief is a podcast dedicated to climate issues in the region stretching from Eastern Europe to Russia down to the Caucasus and Central Asia.This episode is supported by n-ost, The Moscow Times and the European Climate Foundation, and made by:Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and English-language editor for The Conversation.  A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.Boris Schneider, European Journalism Project Manager at Clean Energy Wire (CLEW). Prior he has worked as a specialist on Eastern European climate and energy topics, amongst others for navos Public Dialogue Consultants and the German Economic Team. He graduated from the Free University of Berlin with a M. Sc. in Economics and is interested in the intersection of political economy and ecology in Eurasia.Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting. Angelina left Russia in March 2022 and is now a fellow of the journalistic programme Media in Cooperation and Transition (MICT) in Berlin.Production by the www.thepodcastcoach.co.uk
Countdown to COP27: the Eurasian delegations
Nov 6 2022
Countdown to COP27: the Eurasian delegations
Just a year ago, in the run-up to COP26 in Glasgow, we published the first Eurasian Climate Brief episode. With this year's COP on the doorstep - this time in Sharm-el-Sheikh, Egypt - we are now bringing you the first installment in our special COP27 series.Angelina and Boris speak to Baktygul Chynybaeva, a journalist and communicator with CAN EECCA, the Climate Action Network in Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia, and based in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. What are the delegations coming to this conference with? What is expected to be high on this COP’s agenda? And what about civil society?The Eurasian Climate Brief is a podcast dedicated to climate issues in the region stretching from Eastern Europe to Russia down to the Caucasus and Central Asia.This episode is supported by n-ost, The Moscow Times and the European Climate Foundation, and made by:Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and English-language editor for The Conversation.  A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.Boris Schneider, European Journalism Project Manager at Clean Energy Wire (CLEW). Prior he has worked as a specialist on Eastern European climate and energy topics, amongst others for navos Public Dialogue Consultants and the German Economic Team. He graduated from the Free University of Berlin with a M. Sc. in Economics and is interested in the intersection of political economy and ecology in Eurasia.Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting. Angelina left Russia in March 2022 and is now a fellow of the journalistic programme Media in Cooperation and Transition (MICT) in Berlin.Production by the www.thepodcastcoach.co.uk
The state of renewables in Albania (and beyond)
Oct 31 2022
The state of renewables in Albania (and beyond)
The six Western Balkan countries are struggling to embrace the EU’s plan on green energy. Albania produces almost all its electricity from hydropower plants, but at what cost to the environment? The construction of hydroelectric plants in the Librazhd area is destroying the ecosystem of the Shebenik-Jabllanice National Park. Some of the country’s hydroelectric power plants have been established without thought for the environment and in protected areas. Arlis Alikaj investigated the story in Albania.We also spoke to Rana Adib, executive director of renewable energy think tank REN 21, about their recent report on the development of renewables worldwide. We focused specifically on Eurasia.This episode is supported by n-ost, The Moscow Times and the European Climate Foundation, and made by:Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and English-language editor for The Conversation.  A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.Boris Schneider, European Journalism Project Manager at Clean Energy Wire (CLEW). Prior he has worked as a specialist on Eastern European climate and energy topics. He graduated from the Free University of Berlin with a M. Sc. in Economics and is interested in the intersection of political economy & ecology.Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting. Angelina left Russia in March 2022 and is now a fellow of the journalistic programme Media in Cooperation and Transition (MICT) in Berlin.Arlis Alikaj, an accomplished Albanian investigative journalist with critically acclaimed reporting on environmental and social issues in the Balkan region. During his Balkan Fellowship for Journalistic Excellence by the Balkan Investigative Reporting Network (BIRN), Arlis wrote an in-depth investigative article into illegal logging in Albania’s largest national park, Shebenik-Jabllanice, the last virgin forest trees along the green belt in Europe, which was published regionally in eight languages. He won the CEI SEEMO Award for Outstanding Merits in Investigative Journalism 2019 for his investigation, which is meant to acknowledge his courageous reporting and the importance of the work of young local journalists. He has also worked with CiFAR, a global civil society organisation based in Berlin fighting the theft of state assets. Here he led a cross-border investigation on illegal working permits in the UNESCO site of Lake Ohrid, which is shared by Albania and North Macedonia, in which he documented the corruption and the arbitrary decisions of certain powerful local figures taking place on both sides of Lake Ohrid.Podcast production by www.thepodcastcoach.co.uk
Nord Stream leaks: discussing new climate security threats
Oct 3 2022
Nord Stream leaks: discussing new climate security threats
In late September, four leaks were detected in the gas pipelines linking Russia to Europe, Nord Stream 2 and Nord Stream 1. The incidents, were, in all likelihood, an act of sabotage. In a joint letter to the UN Security Council, Denmark and Sweden declared that they were caused by "at least two detonations" with "several hundred kilos" of explosives, causing major leaks of natural gas into the Baltic Sea. In this episode, we discuss the leaks’ environmental and geopolitical impacts with Sascha Müller-Kraenner, the CEO of Deutsche Umwelthilfe (Environmental Action Germany), a leading environmental, nature conservation, and consumer advocacy organisation.  In 2020, his NGO filed a lawsuit with Germany's Higher Administrative Court against the construction of Nord Stream 2  over its potential methane leaks, including as a result of acts of terrorism. Although Müller-Kraenner lost that legal battle, he has now won the argument.We check in with him whether the leaks are the methane bomb we might fear, and what can we do to fix them. Moreover, could these events prompt governments to take climate security - as well as energy security - more seriously?The Eurasian Climate Brief is a podcast dedicated to climate issues in the region stretching from Eastern Europe to Russia down to the Caucasus and Central Asia.This episode is supported by n-ost, The Moscow Times and the European Climate Foundation, and made by:Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and English-language editor for The Conversation.  A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.Boris Schneider, European Journalism Project Manager at Clean Energy Wire (CLEW). Prior he has worked as a specialist on Eastern European climate and energy topics, amongst others for navos Public Dialogue Consultants and the German Economic Team. He graduated from the Free University of Berlin with a M. Sc. in Economics and is interested in the intersection of political economy and ecology in Eurasia.Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting. Angelina left Russia in March 2022 and is now a fellow of the journalistic programme Media in Cooperation and Transition (MICT) in Berlin.Production by the www.thepodcastcoach.co.uk
War in Ukraine: the knock-on effects on the minerals necessary for the green transition
Sep 5 2022
War in Ukraine: the knock-on effects on the minerals necessary for the green transition
Energy prices were rocked by the Russian invasion, with Aluminium and Nickel prices increasing sharply in the first two weeks after the conflict began with the latter up by more than 100 percent.  Fears around the disruption to supply and concerns about soaring energy prices that could halt production in Europe are being blamed for the hikes. Other metals of interest in this war include titanium, scandium, and palladium.In this episode we discuss the issues around the production and supply of rare earth minerals with Robert Muggah, a political scientist, urbanist and security expert and the co-founder of the Igarape Institute, a think tank dedicated to climate security based in Brazil.The Eurasian Climate Brief is a podcast dedicated to climate issues in the region stretching from Eastern Europe to Russia down to the Caucasus and Central Asia. This episode is supported by n-ost, The Moscow Times and The European Climate Foundation, and made by:• Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and English-language editor for The Conversation. She is also a MA student in Russian and Post-Soviet Politics at the School of Eastern European and Slavonic Studies, University College London. A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.•Boris Schneider, European Journalism Project Manager at Clean Energy Wire CLEW. Prior he has worked as a specialist on Eastern European climate and energy topics, amongst others for navos Public Dialogue Consultants and the German Economic Team. He graduated from the Free University of Berlin with a M. Sc. in Economics and is interested in the intersection of political economy and ecology in Eurasia.•Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting. Angelina left Russia in March 2022 and is now a fellow of the journalistic programme Media in Cooperation and Transition (MICT) in Berlin.Support our work on Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/EurasianClimate. This podcast is produced by https://www.thepodcastcoach.co.uk/
War in Ukraine: the fallout on Russian climate action
Aug 1 2022
War in Ukraine: the fallout on Russian climate action
In September 2019, Russia formally joined the Paris Agreement,  raising hopes the world's fourth emitter would finally throw its weight behind global decarbonisation efforts. The move followed years of lobbying from European governments, including Germany, France and Scandinavian countries. Nearly 3 years later, the Kremlin's war on Ukraine appears to have severely undermined climate action and international collaboration over climate science.  In an interview with Boris Schneider, Maria Pastukhova, a senior policy advisor at E3G climate think tank, assesses the  state of the ecological transition and advises on how the West can limit the damage.The Eurasian Climate Brief is a podcast dedicated to climate issues in the region stretching from Eastern Europe to Russia down to the Caucasus and Central Asia. This episode is supported by n-ost, The Moscow Times and The European Climate Foundation, and made by:• Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and English-language editor for The Conversation. She is also a MA student in Russian and Post-Soviet Politics at the School of Eastern European and Slavonic Studies, University College London. A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.•Boris Schneider, European Journalism Project Manager at Clean Energy Wire CLEW. Prior he has worked as a specialist on Eastern European climate and energy topics, amongst others for navos Public Dialogue Consultants and the German Economic Team. He graduated from the Free University of Berlin with a M. Sc. in Economics and is interested in the intersection of political economy and ecology in Eurasia.•Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting. Angelina left Russia in March 2022 and is now a fellow of the journalistic programme Media in Cooperation and Transition (MICT) in Berlin.Support our work on Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/EurasianClimate.This podcast is produced by https://www.thepodcastcoach.co.uk/
War in Ukraine: the impact on climate diplomacy
Jun 24 2022
War in Ukraine: the impact on climate diplomacy
The Eurasian Climate Brief is a podcast dedicated to climate issues in the region stretching from Eastern Europe to Russia down to the Caucasus and Central Asia.In this episode, we're speaking with Bill Hare, a physicist and climate scientist with 30 years’ experience in science, impacts and policy responses to climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion. He is a founder and CEO of Climate Analytics, which was established to synthesise and advance scientific knowledge on climate change and provide state-of-the-art solutions to global and national climate change policy challenges.This episode is made by:•Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and English-language editor for The Conversation. She is also a MA student in Russian and Post-Soviet Politics at the School of Eastern European and Slavonic Studies, University College London. A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.•Boris Schneider, European Journalism Project Manager at Clean Energy Wire CLEW. Prior he has worked as a specialist on Eastern European climate and energy topics, amongst others for navos Public Dialogue Consultants and the German Economic Team. He graduated from the Free University of Berlin with a M. Sc. in Economics and is interested in the intersection of political economy and ecology in Eurasia.•Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting. Angelina left Russia in March 2022 and is now a fellow of the journalistic programme Media in Cooperation and Transition (MICT) in Berlin.Support our work on Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/EurasianClimate.This podcast is produced by https://www.thepodcastcoach.co.uk/
War in Ukraine: can energy transition and security reinforce each other?
May 12 2022
War in Ukraine: can energy transition and security reinforce each other?
The Eurasian Climate Brief is a podcast dedicated to climate issues in the region stretching from Eastern Europe to Russia down to the Caucasus and Central Asia.In this episode, we're speaking with one of the world’s top Russian energy experts, Thane Gustafson. How has the war in Ukraine has reshaped the global energy trade? And, could it help accelerate the energy transition?Thane is a professor in Russian politics and the politics of Government in the Soviet Union at Georgetown University in Washington. A former professor at Harvard University, he is the author of many books, amongst them, The Bridge: Natural Gas in a Redivided Europe and Wheel of Fortune: The Battle for Oil and Power in Russia, as well as most recently Klimat: Russia in the Age of Climate Change.This episode is made by:•Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and English-language editor for The Conversation. She is also a MA student in Russian and Post-Soviet Politics at the School of Eastern European and Slavonic Studies, University College London. A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.•Boris Schneider, European Journalism Project Manager at Clean Energy Wire CLEW. Prior he has worked as a specialist on Eastern European climate and energy topics, amongst others for navos Public Dialogue Consultants and the German Economic Team. He graduated from the Free University of Berlin with a M. Sc. in Economics and is interested in the intersection of political economy and ecology in Eurasia.•Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting. Angelina left Russia in March 2022 and is now a fellow of the journalistic programme Media in Cooperation and Transition (MICT) in Berlin.
Ukraine: The risk of a nuclear site attack
Apr 6 2022
Ukraine: The risk of a nuclear site attack
One and a half months have passed since Russia invaded Ukraine from the South, the East and Belarus. This is the second episode in our special series on the environmental impacts of the war. On this episode we discuss the nuclear risks and hazards surrounding the war in Ukraine.With us today is Andriy Martynyuk, Executive Director of the NGO Ecoclub in Rivne, Western Ukraine. An environmental engineer by background, Martynyuk been working at Ecoclub since 2003 and is intimately acquainted with the country’s nuclear situation.  Following an overview of the nuclear power plants in the country, he and Boris Schneider discuss the most pressing nuclear risks tied to the war, from radioactive dust from Chernobyl to how attacks on spent nuclear fuel storage facilities could unleash a "dirty nuclear bomb". Also on the table is the question of the international community's response, as the two men delve into the effectiveness of bodies such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the face of the conflict.This episode is produced by:•Boris Schneider, a climate and environment lead at n-ost, a Berlin-based network for cross-border reporting. Boris heads initiatives to boost climate journalism in Central Asia, the Caucasus and Eastern Europe.•Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting.Support our work on Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/EurasianClimate.This podcast is produced by https://www.thepodcastcoach.co.uk/
Ukraine: the environmental impacts of the war
Mar 23 2022
Ukraine: the environmental impacts of the war
Russia’s aggression against Ukraine has changed everything. At the time of writing, there have been more than 900 Ukrainian civilians and 1300 soldiers killed since the start of the invasion on 24 February. At least 7,000 Russian have died - a greater death toll than that of American troops over 20 years in Iraq and Afghanistan combined.The conflict carries risks for the environment, too. On 4 March, Europe held its breath after Russian forces shelled the continent’s largest nuclear power plant, Zaporizhzhia, igniting a fire at a training building. In this instance, firefighters succeeded in extinguished the flames and catastrophe was averted.But the conflict also threatens to unleash chemical hazards. On 21 March, another shelling caused an ammonia leak at a chemical factory near Novoselytsya, in the West of the country on the border with Romania. Residents scrambled to take shelter.Join us, as we discuss the environmental dimensions of the conflict with Wim Zwijnenburg, a project leader for the Dutch peace organisation PAX.  A long-time analyst of the nexus between conflict and the environment in the Middle East, Zwijnenburg has been monitoring the environmental impacts of the conflict in Ukraine since 2014. This episode is made by:•Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and MA student in Russian and Post-Soviet Politics at the School of Eastern European and Slavonic Studies, University College London. A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.•Boris Schneider, a climate and environment lead at n-ost, a Berlin-based network for cross-border reporting. Boris heads initiatives to boost climate journalism in Central Asia, the Caucasus and Eastern Europe.•Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting.
Outsourcing emissions: China's oil and gas ventures in Central Asia
Feb 24 2022
Outsourcing emissions: China's oil and gas ventures in Central Asia
In this episode the Eurasian Climate Brief team are looking into the impact of China’s oil and gas ventures in Central Asia. “What?” I hear you ask? “I thought China was going green and aiming to reach net-zero before 2060.”Take a listen to find out more about this huge story and hear the latest on the impact that China National Petroleum Corporation’s is having on Kazakhstan.We’ll also be bringing you the latest climate headlines from our region at the end of the episode.This episode is made by:•Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and MA student in Russian and Post-Soviet Politics at the School of Eastern European and Slavonic Studies, University College London. A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.•Boris Schneider, a climate and environment lead at n-ost, a Berlin-based network for cross-border reporting. Boris heads initiatives to boost climate journalism in Central Asia, the Caucasus and Eastern Europe. •Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting.•Stephen M. Bland is a freelance journalist, award-winning author, researcher and editor specialising in post-Soviet territories. His book on Central Asia, “Does it Yurt?”, was released in 2016, and he is currently putting the finishing touches to a book about the Caucasus.
Crypto's carbon costs: Eurasia feels the heat
Feb 9 2022
Crypto's carbon costs: Eurasia feels the heat
On 25 January, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan suffered from a mysterious series of electricity power outages, plunging the region into chaos. For several hours, skiers lay perched on lifts and planes grounded while traffic lights, heating district and tap water pumps ran idle. The incident comes after Kazakhstan, the world’s second largest bitcoin producer, faced a similar outage in November 2021. The culprit according to the government? Unregistered cryptocurrency miners.While the exact cause of the 25 January power shortage has yet to be pinpointed, it is now established crypto-mining is piling pressure on the countries’ creaking soviet energy infrastructure.Join us as we discuss the carbon footprint of crypto in Central Asia and the rest of Eurasia. Our reporter Stephen Bland talks to residents and experts about the industry’s impact on Kazakhstan, while Boris Schneider asks economist and campaigner Alex de Vries whether there can ever be such a thing as green crypto-mining.We’ll also be bringing you the latest climate headlines from our region at the end of the episode.This episode is made by:•Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and MA student in Russian and Post-Soviet Politics at the School of Eastern European and Slavonic Studies, University College London. A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.•Boris Schneider, a climate and environment lead at n-ost, a Berlin-based network for cross-border reporting. Boris heads initiatives to boost climate journalism in Central Asia, the Caucasus and Eastern Europe. •Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting.•Stephen M. Bland is a freelance journalist, award-winning author, researcher and editor specialising in post-Soviet territories. His book on Central Asia, “Does it Yurt?”, was released in 2016, and he is currently putting the finishing touches to a book about the Caucasus.•Production by the www.thepodcastcoach.co.uk
Russia's Foreign Agents' Law: Outlawed but not silenced
Jan 26 2022
Russia's Foreign Agents' Law: Outlawed but not silenced
The Eurasian Climate Brief is a new podcast dedicated to climate news in the region stretching from Eastern Europe and Russia down to the Caucasus and Central Asia. This episode is dedicated to the crackdown on environmental activism, almost one month after Russia’s oldest human rights group, Memorial, was liquidated.Our correspondents Anastasia and Ivan Shteynert report on the impact of the so-called foreign agents' law on ecological activism in St-Petersburg and beyond.  Vitaly Servetnik, a campaigner at Russia Friends of the Earth and the Russian socioecological union, takes us through the nuts and bolts of the legislation and explains why environmentalists are set to be the next targets of the Putin regime after human rights activists. Plus we’ll be bringing you the latest climate headlines from our region at the end of the episode.This episode is hosted by:* Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and MA student in Russian and Post-Soviet Politics at the School of Eastern European and Slavonic Studies, University College London. A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.* Boris Schneider, a climate and environment lead at n-ost, a Berlin-based network for cross-border reporting. Boris heads initiatives to boost climate journalism in Central Asia, the Caucasus and Eastern Europe. * Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting.* Anastasia and Ivan Shteynert, two radio journalists based in St-Petersburg.Follow the Eurasian Climate Brief now in your favourite podcast app.Find more news from us at: www.twitter.com/EurasianClimateThis podcast is co-hosted by Brussels’ thebattleground.eu and n-ost, a Berlin based network for cross-border reporting.
Coal of contention: Europe's fight over the Turów mine
Jan 19 2022
Coal of contention: Europe's fight over the Turów mine
It is one of the fiercest environmental disputes on European soil in decades: Warsaw and the Prague have spent the last year sparring over the future of a lignite coal mine located in Turów, southwest Poland, at the frontier with the Czech Republic and Germany. The Czech government argues the recently expanded mine is affecting local groundwater levels and polluting its environment, while the PiS-led cabinet claims the coal mine is essential to its energy security.Our Polish correspondent,  Bartek Sieniawski, reports live in Bogatynia over the tussle, while Natalie Sauer and Boris Schneider talk to Milan Starec, a Czech resident campaigning for the closure of the mine. The Eurasian Climate Brief is a new podcast dedicated to climate news in the region stretching from Eastern Europe and Russia down to the Caucasus and Central Asia. This episode is hosted by:Natalie Sauer, a French British environmental journalist and MA student in Russian and Post-Soviet Politics at the School of Eastern European and Slavonic Studies, University College London. A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.Boris Schneider, a political economy and energy expert at n-ost, a Berlin-based network for cross-border reporting. Boris heads initiatives to boost climate journalism in Central Asia, the Caucasus and Eastern Europe. Bartek Sieniawski, a journalism student at Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland. He is currently carrying out an internship at Euractiv Poland. Follow the Eurasian Climate Brief now in your favourite podcast app.
2021 wrap-up & the story behind the Eurasian Climate Brief
Jan 6 2022
2021 wrap-up & the story behind the Eurasian Climate Brief
In this special New Year episode, we take you behind the scenes of the production of the Eurasian Climate Brief and brief you on the biggest climate stories of the year for our region. Natalie Sauer unpacks Eastern European climate politics, discussing how Poland and other Visegrad countries have locked horns with the EU over climate legislation and forest conservation measures. The spat between the Czech Republic and Poland over an open-pit lignite mine on the border also gets a mention.On Central Asia, Boris Schneider discusses the impact of energy-hungry cryptomining in Kazakhstan as well as the water disputes between Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. Commenting from her kitchen in St-Petersburg, Angelina Davydova closes in on Russia’s climate 2060 net-zero climate target, the country’s mounting environmental protests, and the recent coal mine explosion in Keremovo, Siberia, which left 51 dead.The Eurasian Climate Brief is a new podcast dedicated to climate news in the region stretching from Eastern Europe and Russia down to Caucasia and Central Asia. This episode is hosted by:Natalie Sauer is a French British environmental journalist and MA student in Russian and Post-Soviet Politics at the School of Eastern European and Slavonic Studies, University College London. A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.Boris Schneider is the climate and environment lead at n-ost, a Berlin-based network for cross-border reporting. Boris heads initiatives to boost climate journalism in Central Asia, the Caucasus and Eastern Europe. Angelina Davydova is an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting.Join us for a regional perspective on this historic climate summit. Follow the Eurasian Climate Brief now in your favourite podcast app.Find more news from us at: www.twitter.com/EurasianClimate
Not in my backyard: The battle over Rio Tinto's Serbian lithium mine
Dec 15 2021
Not in my backyard: The battle over Rio Tinto's Serbian lithium mine
Rio Tinto, the world's second biggest mining company, has spent the last years coveting a lithium mining project in Serbia. Exploratory drills have already produced leaks, soiling crops and underground water in their wake. Meanwhile, president Aleksander Vučić has been one of the mine's most fervent cheerleaders, attempting to force through a law facilitating expropriations and weakening referenda standards.But Serbian citizens are increasingly mobilising against it. Last week, mass demonstrations led the president to suspend such laws. Despite this, people are continuing to pour into the streets of Belgrade to demand the laws be dropped.Our Serbian correspondents, Milica Šarić and Jelena Knežević, report live in Belgrade on the growing backlash against the project, while Natalie Sauer and Angelina Davydova talk to Savo Manojlović, the campaign director of one of the protests' organisers, Kreni Promeni.At the time of recording Rio Tinto had not returned our requests for comment.The Eurasian Climate Brief is a new podcast dedicated to climate news in the region stretching from Eastern Europe and Russia down to Caucasia and Central Asia. This episode is hosted by:Natalie Sauer is a French British environmental journalist and MA student in Russian and Post-Soviet Politics at the School of Eastern European and Slavonic Studies, University College London. A former reporter for Climate Home News, her words have also appeared in international media such as Le Monde Diplomatique, Politico Europe, Open Democracy, Euractiv and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.Boris Schneider is a political economy and energy expert at n-ost, a Berlin-based network for cross-border reporting. Boris heads initiatives to boost climate journalism in Central Asia, the Caucasus and Eastern Europe. Angelina Davydova is an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting.Milica Šarić is a journalist for the Center for Investigative Journalism of Serbia (CINS)Jelena Knežević is a radio journalist in Belgrade.Join us for a regional perspective on this historic climate summit. Follow the Eurasian Climate Brief now in your favourite podcast app.Find more news from us at: www.twitter.com/EurasianClimate
Climate projects in Georgia and their pitfalls: an interview with Mariam Devidze
Dec 1 2021
Climate projects in Georgia and their pitfalls: an interview with Mariam Devidze
On this edition of the podcast we are joined by Mariam Devidze from the Green Alternative to talk about climate finance in Georgia. We discuss projects by the Adaptation Fund in particular and we’ll hear about one carried out between 2012 and 2017 to prevent flash floods in the country’s second largest river basin, located on the river Rioni - the main river in Western Georgia. The project equipped locals with a whole set of tools against flooding, including a new flooding warning system and thorough mapping of vulnerable areas. It also attempted to fortify coastal areas. But they were also many things that went wrong, which Mariam elaborates on during our interview.The Eurasian Climate Brief is a new podcast dedicated to climate news in the region stretching from Eastern Europe and Russia down to Caucasia and Central Asia. This episode is hosted by:Natalie Sauer, an environmental journalist and MA student in post-soviet politics at University College London.Boris Schneider, a political economy and energy expert at n-ost, a Berlin-based network for cross-border reporting. Boris heads initiatives to boost climate journalism in Central Asia, the Caucasus and Eastern Europe. Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting.Join us for a regional perspective on this historic climate summit. Follow the Eurasian Climate Brief now in your favourite podcast app.Find more news from us at: www.twitter.com/EurasianClimateThis episode was produced by: www.thepodcastcoach.co.uk
COP26 wrap-up: what has Eurasia achieved? An interview with Olha Boiko
Nov 19 2021
COP26 wrap-up: what has Eurasia achieved? An interview with Olha Boiko
We're reviewing COP26 and asking whether the 1.5 degree target has been kept alive, which would avert catastrophic climate change. What are the conclusions of this COP for Eurasia? And were activists and NGOs from the region capable of being represented at this historic climate summit? Our guest to discuss this is Olha Boiko, coordinator of CAN EECCA (Climate Action Network focusing on Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia) and based in the NGO Ecoaction. Olha is also well versed on the situation in Russia. The Eurasian Climate Brief is a new podcast dedicated to climate news in the region stretching from Eastern Europe and Russia down to Caucasia and Central Asia. This episode is hosted by:Natalie Sauer, an environmental journalist and MA student in post-soviet politics at University College London.Boris Schneider, a political economy and energy expert at n-ost, a Berlin-based network for cross-border reporting. Boris heads initiatives to boost climate journalism in Central Asia, the Caucasus and Eastern Europe. Angelina Davydova, an environmental journalist from Russia. Angelina has been writing about climate change in the region for Russian and international media and attending UN climate summits since 2008. She also teaches environmental journalism and environmental and climate policy and communication in a number of universities and regularly organises training for journalists from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus on environmental and climate reporting.Join us for a regional perspective on this historic climate summit. Follow the Eurasian Climate Brief now in your favourite podcast app. Find more news from us at: www.twitter.com/EurasianClimateThis episode was produced by: www.thepodcastcoach.co.uk