Warfare of Art & Law Podcast

Stephanie Drawdy

Warfare of Art and Law Podcast sparks conversation about the intriguing – and sometimes infuriating – stories that arise in the worlds of art and law with artist and attorney Stephanie Drawdy. read less

Glance at Culture - Journalist and Author Peter Kupfer on his book "The Glassmaker's Son"
Nov 20 2022
Glance at Culture - Journalist and Author Peter Kupfer on his book "The Glassmaker's Son"
The Glassmaker's Son is available here. Please visit Peter Kupfer's website to learn more.Show Notes:3:00 Kupfer’s description of The Glassmaker’s Son 5:00 Kupfer exploration of identity 6:30 Kupfer’s name change 7:45 paternal family history in Germany prior to WWII10:00 1979 first visit to Bavaria11:00 NY attorney for Kupfer’s father12:00 1937 passenger list that includes Kupfer’s father13:00 Kupfer’s grandfather14:30 Kupfer’s grandfather in Terezin15:25 Kupfer Villa sold 16:50 letters between Mr. Kupfer’s father and grandfather regarding escape from Nazis19:00 Kupfer’s glassmaking business 24:00 last meeting of Kupfer business26:00 mixed feelings when meeting Germans who knew Kupfer family prior to/during WWII29:00 level of anti-semitism in Germany31:00 German school education on Holocaust 32:30 importance of visiting concentration camps33:30 Terezin Concentration Camp37:30 efforts to seek return of ancestral portraits44:00 post-war restitution claims46:30 how his story addresses justice47:45 legacy he hopes his book has49:00 his definition of justice confirmed after exploring his family history50:50 most surprising aspect of his research for this book53:00 Stolperstein ceremony honors Kupfer’s family on November 22, which is also the release day of The Glassmaker’s SonTo view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast and/or for information about joining the 2ND Saturday discussion on art, culture and justice, please message me at stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2022]
Art Recognition's Lisa Salama on Artificial Intelligence, Authentication and Art Market Transparency
Nov 13 2022
Art Recognition's Lisa Salama on Artificial Intelligence, Authentication and Art Market Transparency
To learn more, visit Art Recognition's website.SHOW NOTES:2:00 Lisa Salama’s background in art and art law3:00 authentication remains main risk of art trading3:30 Salama’s work overseeing legal aspect of Art Recognition and 4:00 analysis process4:15 the deep convolutional neural network mimics human brain5:30 physical inspection of work is not needed6:00 algorythm assessment determines authenticity6:15 heat map shows important features that led to network’s decision in red6:45 Sample report available, e.g., Cezanne’s Boy In Red Vest7:15 Samson & Delilah confirmed as non-authenticate; listed by National Gallery as a Rubens8:40 Collaboration with universities 10:30 data sets12:00 analysis of paintings and drawings13:00 analysis of restored work14:00 legal issues16:30 data set due diligence process18:00 minimum 100 works for a data set19:00 how AI compliments other authentication methods, e.g., art experts21:00 Unsupervised Deep Learning involves no human programming21:40 works created by school of an artist22:30 different styles and periods of an artists’ work23:00 graffiti23:20 range of clients24:00 over 500 case reports completed 24:10 Future for an Art Recognition app24:45 co-creator Dr. Carina Popovici 26:00 how Art Recognition contributes to transparency in art market28:20 Responsible Art MarketTo view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast and/or for information about joining the 2ND Saturday discussion on art, culture and justice, please message me at stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2022]
Glance at Culture - Marie-Christin Gebhardt on the Museum "Art of the Lost Generation"
Oct 23 2022
Glance at Culture - Marie-Christin Gebhardt on the Museum "Art of the Lost Generation"
To learn more, please visit the website for Museum Art of the Lost Generation.SHOW NOTES:2:10 How Dr. Böhme began his collection2:50 2nd Generation of Modern Artists 3:00  Corinth,  Beckmann,  Klee,  Kokashka 4:00 Museum’s goal to find and research Lost Generation artists 4:50 Museum in historical city centre of Salzburg, 300 square meters 5:00 Using Brush and Paint Against the Time exhibition5:20 Exhibition poster image – 1955 self-portrait by Heinrich Emil Adametz studied at Hamburg School of Arts and Crafts5:50 1933 Heinrich Emil Adametz was banned6:00 1945 Heinrich Emil Adametz returned to Berlin7:00 Special exhibition on destinies of female artists from lost generation 7:15 Until end of WWI, women were denied access to universities and art colleges1933 –  Jacobis refused to close their school; fled to NY and re-opened school9:30 1889 Felka Platek born in Warsaw9:40 1923 - Platek moved to Berlin9:50 Felix Nussbaum11:45 Felka and Felix 12:00 Frankfurt artist Hanna Becker Van Rath12:40 Van Rath’s Blue House in Germany 13:00 We Haven’t Seen Each Other In So Long  14:00 Provenance research process14:50 Digitization aids in research 15:20 Provenance research defines them as a museum 17:00 engagement/sponsoring program17:30 Frankfurt Artist Ruth Camp’s portrait of woman18:00 Canvases by Heinrich Esser found rolled in attic 18:20 Three People by Esser19:40 Posthumous political Portrait of Dr. Friedrich Maase (1878-1959) by Gert Heinrich Wollheim 21:00 Female Destinies 21:45 Future of the museum - coming to terms with the past by focusing on the artists and their fates22:30 combines art history with contemporary history 23:00 Museum to be part of the movement to create justice for these artists 23:40 visitor comments and press feedback 25:05 library 26:00 Meet Me in Paris Exhibition 27:45 female artists seeking education in Paris29:00 Paris co-ed classes29:50 nude works by Martha Bernstein and Rudolf Levy30:20 Montparnasse cafe scene31:15 1933 Paris as a safe haven from National Socialists – life in exile32:00 Occupied Paris33:20 Russian artist Samuel Granovsky - worked with pastels and a spatula35:50 Granovsky nicknamed the Cowboy of Montparnasse36:45 Matisse student Martha Bernstein; 1911 Female Nude in Atelier38:20 Bernstein later became part of the Berlin Secession 38:50 Malweiber (painting women) mocking term for female artists 40:30 Adolf Da Haer’s 1940 On the Beach; shifted from expressionism to conservative natural approach43:45 Mack Koch – example of inner immigration 46:45 Koch’s 1930 Woman With Pipe48:45 Häfner family 49:55 Herbert Häfner’s 1935 Portrait of Miss Lilo Jüngst52:35 Ilse Häfner-Mode’s Portrait of a Woman in front of a Wooden Door54:20 Thomas Häfner’s Fantasy Landscape with Mask56:00 Ilsa Häfner’s ink drawings while interned 56:30 feedbackTo view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast and/or for information about joining the 2ND Saturday discussion on art, culture and justice, please message me at stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2022]
Artist Ben Kinmont on Experimenting With What Art Can Be, Antiquarian Bookselling, Economic Precarity, Artists' Contracts & More
Oct 9 2022
Artist Ben Kinmont on Experimenting With What Art Can Be, Antiquarian Bookselling, Economic Precarity, Artists' Contracts & More
Cover image: Ben Kinmont and the Antinomian Press at Section Seven Books, Paris, printing Project Series: Lee Lozano.For more information, please visit the websites for Antinomian Press, Ben Kinmont Bookseller, Ben Kinmont's projects and his gallery page.SHOW NOTES:0:00 Artist Ben Kinmont’s thoughts on artist / attorney collaboration3:30 Kinmont’s initial art practice in NYC 3:50 Kinmont’s work with antiquarian bookseller focused on medicine and science4:20 Kinmont’s antiquarian bookselling business - Sometimes a nicer sculpture is to be able to provide a living for your family5:00 Occupational realism coined as a term by Julia Bryant Wilson5:35 Kinmont’s practice included painting, video, sculpture, photography 5:50 his street project in NYC and Cologne titled I am for you, ich bin fur sie consisted of three sculptures6:15 “The Social Sculpture” - Joseph Beuys6:40 ‘The Thinking Sculpture’ - William James 7:10 cognitive process as a sculptural process7:25 “The Third Sculpture”8:00 I Am For You 9:00 Christo’s public projects are about his conversations with farmers and coastal commission 10:35 The Materialization of Life Into Alternative Economies 11:45 Antinomian Press 14:40 economic precarity subtheme15:10 theme of art in everyday life, what we can and can’t call art16:00 Borders of what can and cannot be called art 17:45 NYU Draper Institute lecture to grad class of anthropology 19:00 cultural differences in interviewing NYC and Cologne individuals21:15 archives of his projects led to his interest in contracts and Promised Relations: or, thoughts on a few artists’ contracts? 24:20 Tilted Arc contract 24:30 Felix Gonzalez-Torres’ certificates25:30 Kinmont’s contract25:40 Attorney Jerry Ordover25:55 Seth Seigelab and Bob Projansky artist contract29:45 MoMA Department of Prints and Drawing’s purchase of Antinomian Press archive31:40 why artists shy away from using contracts36:45 circa 1990 - Trust as Sculpture – strangers invited to waffle breakfast in Kinmont’s home 38:15 understand history to create discourse around your own experience40:00 feedback from An Exhibition In Your Mouth41:45 social and political meaning behind the study of gastronomy42:50 Inter-sectionality of gastronomy with women’s studies, economic history, ethnography, class, medicine, health44:40 Gastronomy and Economic Precarity45:50 FBI’s attacks on the Black Panther’s Free Breakfast Programs46:50 San Quintin death row inmate’s inquiry about publishing  Death Row Cookbook48:50 his projects addressing injustice  50:25 Ethical Considerations in Project Art Practice 51:10 definition of justice 51:50 2011 Carl Andre Killed His Wife Ana Mendieta53:00 Olivier Mosset bought and later returned it54:25 Andre’s involvement in Art Workers Coalition Group and work using proletariat materTo view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast and/or for information about joining the 2ND Saturday discussion on art, culture and justice, please message me at stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2022]
Glance at Culture - Ella Nowicki on Incarceration, Art and Defining Justice in Terms of Accountability
Sep 25 2022
Glance at Culture - Ella Nowicki on Incarceration, Art and Defining Justice in Terms of Accountability
Please visit the following links to learn more:Shahn’s sketches for Rikers Island;Correctional History discussion of Shahn; Lucienne Bloch, Cycle of a Woman’s Life: Childhood: Shahn’s photo of an incarcerated painter at Blackwell’s Island; Larry Cook, The Visiting Room and Urban Landscapes;Groundswell murals at Rikers; Handwritten survey responses in the Shahn Papers at the Archives of American Art.SHOW NOTES:2:00 Ben Shahn’s and Lou Block’s proposed Rikers Island Penitentiary murals for the New Deal 4:45 West wall’s mural representing prison reform6:05 East wall’s mural of prisons in need of reform8:20 New York’s Municipal Art Commission rejects murals as psychologically unfit for prisoners and as anti-social propaganda 9:00 1935 survey of Blackwell Island prisoners about murals11:35 one incarcerated man likened Shahn’s murals to Diego Rivera’s Rockefeller Center mural12:40 concerns about making incarcerated life a spectacle14:10 responses by Ben Shahn and Lou Block to survey17:20 utility of survey for art historians19:10 survey archive21:30 Ben Shahn’s New Deal Murals: Jewish Identity in the American Scene by Diana Linden22:10 Ben Shahn’s New York by Harvard Art Musuems22:50 Art for the Millions: Essays from the 1930s by artists and administrators of the WPA Project by Francis O’Connor includes material from Lucienne Bloch23:10 Bloch’s “Cycle of a Woman’s Life” accepted for WPA Project in 193523:50 Bloch’s primary sources quote from letters by incarcerated females 29:30 Harold Lehman’s Man’s Daily Bread erected at Rikers and later removed35:20 Faith Ringgold’s 1971 For the Women’s House37:00 Reception to Ringgold’s For the Women’s House by male incarcerated population 38:45 2012 Prison Landscapes by Alyse Emdur42:10 Antoine Ealy’s opinion of prison landscapes43:20 utility of murals in correctional institutions44:15 Nicole Fleetwood’s book and exhibition Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration45:00 Shahn’s photograph of incarcerated man painting portrait at Blackwell’s Island 47:30 Utility of art as a direct and didactic tool 51:00 how a focus on art in correction facilities aids in facilitating justice 56:00 Marking Time includes incarcerated and non-incarcerated artists56:20 Artist Larry Cook 57:30 Groundswell NYC58:20 How Nowocki defines justice 59:20 Mariame Kaba’s view of justice in terms of accountability as compared with punishmentTo view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast and/or for information about joining the 2ND Saturday discussion on art, culture and justice, please message me at stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2022]
ASU Art Museum Director Miki Garcia On Art's Power to Address Inherited Notions About Mass Incarceration, the Undoing Time Exhibition, and Justice As Public Love
Sep 11 2022
ASU Art Museum Director Miki Garcia On Art's Power to Address Inherited Notions About Mass Incarceration, the Undoing Time Exhibition, and Justice As Public Love
Cover photo of Miki Garcia by Alonso Parra.Please visit the website for Undoing Time: Art and Histories of Incarceration at ASU's Art Museum and at Berkeley Art Museum to learn more.1:30 ASU Art Museum’s mission as a learning institution that centers art and artists in the service of social good and community well-being2:40 inspiration for Undoing Time: Art and Histories of Incarceration exhibition as a cultural mark in time for ASU Art Museum 6:40 effort to address all dimensions of an exhibition on mass incarceration and its impact on viewers8:00 Art for Justice Fund’s involvement in exhibition 9:05 prior exhibition with artist Gregory Sale who worked with incarcerated populations9:15 Contemporary Art Museum Houston and Nicole Fleetwood’s work with the Walls Turned Sideways: Artists Confront the Justice System exhibition 10:20 Undoing Time’s focus began with a survey of how incarceration has been portrayed through images from the 18th Century Code of Hammurabi forward11:30 12 artists invited to create commissions for Undoing Time, including Mario Ybarra, Jr. who created a pizza parlor vignette that dealt with Ybarra’s childhood friend Richard who later was incarcerated on a murder charge13:20 rehabilitation was shown in Ybarra’s work that’s not shown in historical images of incarceration 13:55 Stephanie Syjuco’s commission abstracted images of black and brown incarcerated population15:10 Juan Brenner’s commission about the Guatemalan Highlands and how the U.S. West Coast prison system gang culture was exported to Central America16:10 destruction of Guatemalan Highlands’ residence due to erection of prison that houses Mara Salvatrucha gang17:25 architecture of prisons, e.g, the panopticon, the fortress18:00 Indigenous artists Raven Chacon and Cannupa Hanska Luger 19:15 Luger’s commission focus on the relationship of land to mass incarceration19:25 Mass Liberation Arizona’s mission of people over property21:00 Theater maker and Playwright Michael Rohd choreographed going through the exhibition 22:55 Raven Chacon’s musical composition about a juvenile detention center24:10 Rohd’s positing of questions and cards for viewer feedback 26:45 Art for Justice Fund to ASU poet Natalie Diaz and the Center for Imagination in the Borderlands30:00 undergoing critique of the purpose and operation of museums 33:30 museums are civic institutions of dialogue, engagement and storytelling and should be responsible to the communities they serve35:30 art’s power to challenge inherited narratives about incarceration 37:15 how she sees her legacy to eliminate as many boundaries as possible and uphold all kinds of art forms and include more voices and to open up what a museum can be and who it’s actually for39:20 evolution of her definition of justice 40:45 justice has to be fought for 40:55 justice as public loveTo view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast and/or for information about joining the 2ND Saturday discussion on art, culture and justice, please message me at stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2022]
2ND Saturday Art + Justice Bonus: Artist & Attorney Gina McKlveen
Sep 4 2022
2ND Saturday Art + Justice Bonus: Artist & Attorney Gina McKlveen
The featured image is titled Peggy Cooper Cafritz (2020), acrylic on canvas, 16"x20", Gina McKlveen. Image: © and TM Gina McKlveen. All rights reserved.Peggy Cooper Cafritz grew up in Mobile, Alabama under Jim Crow laws during the days of racial segregation in the Southern United States of America. She moved to Washington, DC in 1964 to attend college at The George Washington University, where she was instrumental in creating organizations for Black students on campus. Continuing her education at George Washington University Law School, she graduated with her Juris Doctor degree in 1971. Cafritz was significantly involved in the arts community while she was a student, serving on boards, chairing committees, and planning several festivals in the nation's capital. However, Cafritz solidified her support for the arts when she co-founded the Duke Ellington School of the Arts, a public high school located in Washington, DC that focuses on arts education. Throughout her lifetime, Cafritz developed an extensive art collection primarily of works by artists of African descent as a means to address the absence and confront the erasure of Black history in the United States. She passed away in 2018, gifting portions of her art collection between the Duke Ellington School of the Arts in DC and the Studio Museum in Harlem, NY. To view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast and/or for information about joining the 2ND Saturday discussion on art, culture and justice, please message me at stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2022]
Glance at Culture - Dr. Henry Greenspan On Listening to Holocaust Survivors, Memory, Psychology, the Warsaw Ghetto and Minimalist Theatre
Aug 28 2022
Glance at Culture - Dr. Henry Greenspan On Listening to Holocaust Survivors, Memory, Psychology, the Warsaw Ghetto and Minimalist Theatre
Please visit Dr. Greenspan's website to learn more.Show Notes:00:00 impression of survivor about Greenspan’s representation of their story 03:00 1970s interview for psychologist 04:20 depth rather than breadth of his interviews with Holocaust survivors6:25 collaborative meetings with survivors7:00 Agi Rubin described good interviews as learning together9:00 Process of creating courses, books, plays from conversations with survivors13:45 Greenspan’s dissertation topic on this became his life’s work15:10 Agi Rubin: I’m not a “Survivor” as a category.18:35 On Listening to Holocaust Survivors: Beyond Testimony19:00 Leon’s recollection of murder of Paul Lieberman22:10 Leon’s correction that his recollection is not a story; it must be made a story25:30 Remnants  29:50 Reflections: Auschwitz, Memory and a Life Recreated35:40 Death/Play or the Mad Jester of the Warsaw Ghetto41:20 source material for Death/Play or the Mad Jester of the Warsaw Ghetto44:40 short play Gravediggers involving the Ukraine 47:20 Greenspan’s view of injustice 48:00 His work is ‘disposable people’ studies49:40 Corruption53:00 what we do together is where hope is53:45 per Agi Rubin, legacy is not up to herTo view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast and/or for information about joining the 2ND Saturday discussion on art, culture and justice, please message me at stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2022]
Richard Harwood, QC, On Contested Heritage: Removing Art From Land and Historic Buildings with Co-Host Emily Gould
Aug 14 2022
Richard Harwood, QC, On Contested Heritage: Removing Art From Land and Historic Buildings with Co-Host Emily Gould
For those interested in obtaining a copy of Contested Heritage Removing Art From Land and Historic Buildings by Richard Harwood QC, Catherine Dobson and David Sawtell, please visit the publisher’s website and use code P8W4VZ for a 10% discount.Show Notes:00:00 overview of Contested Heritage – Removing Art From Land and Historic Buildings2:10 Lucien Freud mural of flower; removed from a house that was a listed building3:14 Rustat Memorial plaque at Jesus College chapel4:20 Emily Gould introductory comments5:00 What is meant by contested heritage5:50 co-authors Catherine Dobson and David Sawtell6:00 dispute over public memorialization of certain person or events 8:20 question of whether a work is part of a building, who owns it, to what extent it’s subject to listed building control9:05 Dill case10:15 Dill involves pair of 18th C. lead urns produced by Flemish sculptor John van Nost and placed on limestone piers in Wrest Park12:00 2015 local planning authority learn urns are not at Idlicote House and issue enforcement notice for their return17:20 regulatory issues, export licensing 17:50 property ownership19:00 Old Flo case19:30 London Borough of Tower Hamlets v. London Borough of Bromley19:40 Henry Moore statue Draped Seated Woman21:20 purpose of annexation 27:00 listed building control28:00 main considerations for authorities faced with application for removal of contested statue or other memorial or work of art29:00 for listed buildings, strong presumption in favour of building to protect special architectural or historic interest 30:00 Public Sector Equality Duty31:00 Jen Reid statute appeal32:35 Rustat Memorial case 37:40 Colston case 38:40 Colston – late 17th C. deputy governor of the Royal African Company that ran slave trade and benefactor of Bristol40:45 ‘Colston 4’ trial – individuals charged with criminal damage and acquitted41:00 acquittal now on appeal by Attorney General’s reference on lawfulness of some lines of defence run, including question of right to freedom of expression and extent that can justify attacking property41:45 ‘retain and explain’ policy43:10 changes to planning and listed building procedures 44:35 Cecil Rhodes statues and other memorials in Oxford46:35 another Rhodes commemorative plaque in Oxford recently listed by Secretary of State 46:45 increased public awareness about these issues 47:15 Arts education charity, Art UK recent catalogue of 13,500 British public sculpture - only 2% commemorate people of colour48:35 public art 49:45 Old Flo example of post-war public authority support for public art50:00 developers recently encouraged to include public art, e.g., Desert Quartet Sculptures by Dame Elisabeth Frink placed in back of Worthing shopping center and now a listed building51:50 Ulster Defence Regiment memorial in Lisburn, N. Ireland includes a female 53:00 National Windrush Monument in Waterloo Station commemorates arrival of Caribbean migrants after WWII54:20 political issues about colonialism and empire involved with cultural heritage disputeTo view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast and/or for information about joining the 2ND Saturday discussion on art, culture and justice, please message me at stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2022]
2ND Saturday Art + Justice Bonus: Emily Gould on the Colston 4 Trial and Acquittal
Aug 7 2022
2ND Saturday Art + Justice Bonus: Emily Gould on the Colston 4 Trial and Acquittal
Show notes:1:00 evidence at trial from historian David Olusoga regarding Colston's ownership of more slaves than any other Brit in history, one of the earliest, biggest slave traders 1:30 Colston died circa 1720 1:45 statue of Colston erected by Victorian dignitaries in Bristol2:10 half of the schools, streets and whatever in Bristol are named after Colston2:20 circa 1990s, true history of Colston revealed3:25 in the wake of the killing of George Floyd, the Black Lives Matter protests group pushed Colston statue into the harbor 3:45 restorative justice by others with community penalty3:55 Colston 4 jury trial over prosecution of four individuals involved in toppling Colston statute4:05 Elected for a Crown Court jury trial and were acquitted5:20 Conservatives and those in the government, including the cabinet, expressed surprise at the verdict6:10 UK Attorney General considered whether to send the case to the appeal court to consider whether there was an error of law in the direction of the jury7:50 bill going through Parliament with a provision to increase the potential sentence for criminal damage against a public monument8:15 proposed bill to change threshold that currently exists for criminal damage against a memorial or public monument with value under 5000 pounds, maximum sentence magistrates that could  impose was three months in prison8:50 proposed bill is to remove financial threshold and make maximum sentence 10 yearsTo view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast and/or for information about joining the 2ND Saturday discussion on art, culture and justice, please message me at stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2022]
Glance at Culture - Dr. Jennnifer Mass, President of Scientific Analysis of Fine Art, On Cultural Heritage Science, Modigliani's Palette, Creating Scientific Literacy and More
Jul 31 2022
Glance at Culture - Dr. Jennnifer Mass, President of Scientific Analysis of Fine Art, On Cultural Heritage Science, Modigliani's Palette, Creating Scientific Literacy and More
To learn more, please visit the website for Scientific Analysis of Fine Art, LLC.Show Notes:0:01 use of scientific methods in London and Berlin to understand and preserve cultural heritage since 19th Century 2:30 history of cultural heritage science 4:00 founding Scientific Analysis of Fine Art LLC (SAFA) 5:40 Yves Tanguy’s Fraud in the Garden5:50 catalogue raisonné prepared by art historians Charles Stuckey and Stephen Mack6:10 fascist attack during screening of Luis Bunuel’s satiric “L’Age d’Oro” 7:00 use of multi-spectral imaging on Fraud in the Garden included ultraviolet light and infrared radiation, and x-rays to view slash pattern on painting7:45 multiple restorations on Fraud in the Garden dated through the pigments and paint binders9:00 value of artwork as historical documents versus restoration of the artwork 9:45 cultural heritage as historical documents example of Victoria & Albert Museum10:45 display of the Rothko Murals at Harvard by projecting original color on faded paintings11:45 analysis for attribution questions varies between antiquities, paintings, decorative art objects13:20 non-destructive drive for protocols for elemental and molecular analysis14:00 changes to work by Van Gogh and Met’s Irises and Roses exhibit on this14:30 geranium lake known as Eosin red15:00 paints like cadmium yellows and chromium yellows created during the Industrial Revolution are also very sensitive to light and relative humidity15:15 changes in Matisse’s 4 versions of Joy of Life – yellows fading to ivory white15:30 mechanism of degradation 16:20 Picasso's 1901 The Blue Room 17:30 Cezanne18:15 analysis of over 900 tubes of paint from Munch19:30 paints standardized in 1920s 21:00 flaking of zinc white: reaction of zinc oxide with oil creates crystalized molecules - zinc soaps21:25 titanium white 23:00 heavy metal pigment paints that strongly absorb x-rays like lead white or vermillion (a mercury sulfide red) prevent seeing under-painting24:45 head of the scientific vetting committee for TEFAF New York 27:15 Court of Arbitration for Art 28:35 trusting science to conduct due diligence 30:30 stigma  attached to use of science 33:00 Bard Graduate Center34:00 wooden polychrome sculpture analysis: dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating36:00  dirty dozen paint list36:45 mixing drying oil paints (linseed) with non-drying oil paints (sunflower)37:50 Eosin red, emerald green, cadmium yellow, chromium yellow, vermillion, copper blues  38:50 favorite paintings 39:10 Modigliani Collection at the Barnes 39:45 Modigliani’s palette 40:35 The Burlington Magazine 41:10  Klimt’s Faculty Paintings 42:30 computational technologies to bring lost work back to life43:00 facilitating justice43:45 invention of photography enabled Jacob Riis to document New York slums 44:00 20th Century photographer and sociologist Lewis Hine44:20 BLM movement44:30 environmental justice issues 45:40 recommendations to pursue cultural heritage science 46:55 legacy to create scientific literacy for art conservators and historiansTo view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast and/or for information about joining the 2ND Saturday discussion on art, culture and justice, please message me at stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2022]
David de Jong on his book Nazi Billionaires and his call for Historical Transparency from Families that control brands like BMW, Porsche, Volkswagen, Dr. Oetker, Bahlsen, Allianz and Munich Re
Jul 10 2022
David de Jong on his book Nazi Billionaires and his call for Historical Transparency from Families that control brands like BMW, Porsche, Volkswagen, Dr. Oetker, Bahlsen, Allianz and Munich Re
To learn more, please visit David de Jong's website.Show Notes:3:30 overview of Nazi Billionaires5:15 families included in Nazi Billionaires control companies like BMW and Porche whitewashing patriarchs’ legacies6:15 moral and historical reconstruction – acknowledging what’s transpired in history9:00 Quandt dynasty and BMW Group10:00 Flick dynasty and Daimler-Benz11:10: Von Finck and Allianz and Munich Re 11:45 Porsche-Piëch - Volkswagen, Porsche, Bentley                                                       13:40 Oetkers - baking powder, cake mixes, Germany’s largest beer brewery, one of Europe’s largest sparkling wine manufacturers, luxury hotels14:00 Flick’s conviction of war crimes and post-war business success19:20 Flick released on good behavior and saw himself as wrongfully convicted20:30 Ferry Porsche’s autobiography We At Porsche22:30 Rosenberger’s post-war settlement with Porsche23:30 Porsche Sales & Marketing Representative Joachim Peiper’s death sentence commuted for the Malmedy Massacre of U.S. Army POWs24:45 English version of We At Porsche25:30 German version of We At Porsche26:00 Porsche AG spokesperson and head of Porsche Foundation Dr. Sebastian Rudolph 28:30 research for Nazi Billionaires for 4 years starting in 2017 29:00 archive availability and Fold 3 access30:30 German academic reporting of Nazi family histories32:00 breadth and depth of families’ collaboration with Third Reich33:00 Reimann family emerge in 2019 as Germany’s second wealthiest family 36:50 Reimann family’s Alfred Landecker Foundation 38:20 German family Bahlsen’s study expected summer 202339:20 ignorant remarks by Verena Bahlsen41:00 how current ignorance and historical distortion are related to overlooking war crimes41:50 dynasties’ lean on notion of collective guilt46:00 de Jong’s family experience 47:00 Artist Max van Dam49:30 his family experience makes him mindful of history 51:00 his motivation to get these stories out51:50 plans for a second book about dynasties that shaped the U.S. and the Netherlands 52:50 evolution of his definition of justice over the course of writing Nazi BillionairesTo view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast and/or for information about joining the 2ND Saturday discussion on art, culture and justice, please message me at stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2022]
Glance at Culture - Author Menachem Kaiser on His Book Plunder, His Research and Property Claim in Poland, the Vilna Ghetto and the Frustrating Design of Judicial Systems
Jun 26 2022
Glance at Culture - Author Menachem Kaiser on His Book Plunder, His Research and Property Claim in Poland, the Vilna Ghetto and the Frustrating Design of Judicial Systems
Cover photo of Menachem Kaiser by Beowulf Sheehan.To learn more, please visit the website for Menacham Kaiser and Plunder.Show Notes:2:00 genesis of Plunder: A Memoir of family property and Nazi treasure4:00 the memoir by Abraham Kajser6:45 Kajser’s experience as a forced laborer during WWII in underground camp structures in Poland that were given the code name Project Riese 7:30 Polish version and Hebrew version of Kajser’s memoir8:45 political decisions in what stories are given attention10:30 the writer’s mandate to create work that’s honest11:20 he went on a Fulbright to Lithuania11:50 his unexpected research on the Vilna Ghetto12:30 lessons missed in Holocaust education13:00 his revelation of how morally and historically complicated and interesting the Holocaust is14:00 Jews’ self-governance in ghettos included trials and hangings15:00 How the ‘politics memory’ differs in countries like Lithuania and Poland17:00 The arc of his thoughts on the moral and ethical questions raised by his inheritance claim for his grandfather’s building21:00 status of his inheritance claim for his grandfather’s building22:00 move by mayor of Sosnowiec to claim his grandfather’s building25:30 Nationalist shift in Poland, resulting in failed/dismissed property claims27:00 response to Plunder in Poland28:30 KARTA publisher of Plunder in Poland 30:00 the challenges he dealt with in researching the book 31:50 research into forced displacement of Germans after WWII34:30 myth-soaked Silesia became a character in the book36:30 archive from Vilnius, Lithuania38:00 David Fishman’s The Book Smugglers40:00 value of archives in digitized form versus physical form41:00 Vilnius archive re-surfaced in the late 1980s/early 1990s 43:00 arts programs in the Vilna ghetto during WWII43:30 Artist Samuel Bak44:00 Poet Abraham Sutzkever44:15 Protest songs by poet, musician, writer and activist Szmerke Kaczerginski44:40 civil war rumblings in Vilna ghetto46:50 Jacob Gens, head of the Vilna ghetto government47:45 death of Itzik Wittenberg, Hero of the Vilna Ghetto / leader of the Resistance49:30 anti-Semitism in Poland50:30 his thoughts on how the justice system is designed to frustrate efforts 52:15 his thoughts on how his legacy is being shaped as a writer57:00 his current project related to an ongoing story in Montreal that involves allegations of hiding 4B in Nazi gold.To view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast and/or for information about joining the 2ND Saturday discussion on art, culture and justice, please message me at stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2022]