Weird Studies

Phil Ford and J. F. Martel

Professor Phil Ford and writer/filmmaker J. F. Martel host a series of conversations on art and philosophy, dwelling on ideas that are hard to think and art that opens up rifts in what we are pleased to call "reality."

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Episode 129: Luminous Miasma: On Edgar Allan Poe's "The Fall of the House of Usher"
6d ago
Episode 129: Luminous Miasma: On Edgar Allan Poe's "The Fall of the House of Usher"
Edgar Allan Poe can be lauded as a major inspiration for many innovative artists, genres, and movements, from horror fiction to the music of Maurice Ravel. He has also been a major inspiration for Weird Studies, particularly his short story "The Fall of the House of Usher." In this episode, JF and Phil try to pinpoint just what it is about this tale that is so compelling, discovering in the process that whatever it is cannot be pinpointed. Instead, the haunting mood of the story emerges from the peculiar arrangement of all its parts, becoming something entirely new. Click here ( for more information on the Supernormal Festival, Aug 12-14, in Oxfordshire, England. Listen to volume 1 ( and volume 2 ( of the Weird Studies soundtrack by Pierre-Yves Martel ( us on Patreon ( Find us on Discord ( the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau ( your Weird Studies merchandise ( (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop ( Allan Poe, “The Fall of the House of Usher” ( Edgar Allan Poe, “The Masque of the Red Death ( Klangfarbenmelodie ( musical technique Edgar Allan Poe, "The Poetic Principle" ( Harman, Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy ( Lovecraft without adjectives ( Weird Studies, Development of Circle vs. Spiral: Wheel of fortune ( Blade Runner ( The Star ( Birhane ( Matei Calinescu, The Five Faces of Modernity ( Weird Studies, Episode 101 on ‘In Praise of Shadows’ ( Phanes ( deity James Herbert, The Dark ( Joseph Adamson, “Frye and Poe” ( Lucien Lévy-Bruhl ( French anthropologist James Machin, Weird Fiction in Britain ( Edgar Allan Poe, “Eureka” (
Episode 129: Luminous Miasma: On Edgar Allan Poe's "The Fall of the House of Usher"
6d ago
Episode 129: Luminous Miasma: On Edgar Allan Poe's "The Fall of the House of Usher"
Edgar Allan Poe can be lauded as a major inspiration for many innovative artists, genres, and movements, from horror fiction to the music of Maurice Ravel. He has also been a major inspiration for Weird Studies, particularly his short story "The Fall of the House of Usher." In this episode, JF and Phil try to pinpoint just what it is about this tale that is so compelling, discovering in the process that whatever it is cannot be pinpointed. Instead, the haunting mood of the story emerges from the peculiar arrangement of all its parts, becoming something entirely new. Click here ( for more information on the Supernormal Festival, Aug 12-14, in Oxfordshire, England. Listen to volume 1 ( and volume 2 ( of the Weird Studies soundtrack by Pierre-Yves Martel ( us on Patreon ( Find us on Discord ( the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau ( your Weird Studies merchandise ( (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop ( Allan Poe, “The Fall of the House of Usher” ( Edgar Allan Poe, “The Masque of the Red Death ( Klangfarbenmelodie ( musical technique Edgar Allan Poe, "The Poetic Principle" ( Harman, Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy ( Lovecraft without adjectives ( Weird Studies, Development of Circle vs. Spiral: Wheel of fortune ( Blade Runner ( The Star ( Birhane ( Matei Calinescu, The Five Faces of Modernity ( Weird Studies, Episode 101 on ‘In Praise of Shadows’ ( Phanes ( deity James Herbert, The Dark ( Joseph Adamson, “Frye and Poe” ( Lucien Lévy-Bruhl ( French anthropologist James Machin, Weird Fiction in Britain ( Edgar Allan Poe, “Eureka” (
Episode 128: Demon Workshop: On Victoria Nelson's 'Neighbor George'
Jul 19 2022
Episode 128: Demon Workshop: On Victoria Nelson's 'Neighbor George'
The American writer and thinker Victoria Nelson is justly revered by afficionados of the Weird for The Secret Life of Puppets and its follow-up Gothicka. Both are masterful explorations the supernatural as it subsists in the "sub-Zeitgeist" of the modern secular West. In 2021, Strange Attractor Press released Neighbor George, Nelson's first novel. In this episode, JF and Phil discuss this gothic anti-romance with a mind to seeing how it contributes to Nelson's overall project of acquainting us with the eldritch undercurrents of contemporary life. Click here ( for more information on the Supernormal Festival, Aug 12-14, in Oxfordshire, England. Listen to volume 1 ( and volume 2 ( of the Weird Studies soundtrack by Pierre-Yves Martel ( us on Patreon ( Find us on Discord ( the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau ( your Weird Studies merchandise ( (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop ( Nelson, Neighbor George ( Victoria Nelson, The Secret Life of Puppets ( Victoria Nelson, Gothicka ( Wendy Lesser ( American critic Ward Sutton Onion cartoons ( Extension ( metaphysical concept Terry Castle, The Female Thermometer ( Cessation of Miracles ( theological belief E. E. Evans-Pritchard, Witchcraft, Oracles, and Magic among the Azande ( Greg Anderson, “Retrieving the Lost Worlds of the Past: A Case for the Ontological Turn” ( Orcus Grotto ( sculpture Margaret Atwood, The Edible Woman ( Cooke, [Margaret Atwood: A Biography]( Weird Studies, Episode 96 on Beauty and the Beast ( M. C. Richards, “Wrestling with the Daemonic” (
Episode 127: Leaving the Mechanical Dollhouse: On Abeba Birhane's "The Impossibility of Automating Ambiguity"
Jul 6 2022
Episode 127: Leaving the Mechanical Dollhouse: On Abeba Birhane's "The Impossibility of Automating Ambiguity"
Like Caligula declaring war on Neptune and ordering his troops to charge into the Mediterranean Sea, our technological masters are designing neural networks meant to capture the human soul in all its oceanic complexity. According to the cognitive scientist Abeba Birhane, this is a fool's errand that we undertake at our peril. In her paper "The Impossibility of Automating Ambiguity," she makes the case for the irremediable fluidity, spontaneity, and relationality of people and societies. She argues that ongoing efforts to subsume the human (and the rest of reality) in predictive algorithms is actually narrowing the human experience, as so many of us are excluded from the system while others are compelled to artificially conform to its idea of the human. Far from paving the way to a better world, the tyranny of automation threatens to cut us off from the Real, ensuring an endless perpetuation of the past with all its errors and injustices. Phil and JF discuss Birhane's essay in this episode. Header image from via www.vpnsrus.com (cropped). Downloaded from Wikimedia Commons ( to volume 1 ( and volume 2 ( of the Weird Studies soundtrack by Pierre-Yves Martel ( us on Patreon ( Find us on Discord ( the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau ( your Weird Studies merchandise ( (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop ( Birhane, "The Impossibility of Automating Ambiguity” J. F. Martel, “Reality is Analog: Philosophizing with Stranger Things” ( Melissa Adler, Cruising the Library: Perversities in the Organization of Knowledge ( Weird Studies, Episode 75 on 2001: A Space Odyssey ( Studies, Episode 114 on the Wheel of Fortune ( William James ( American philosopher Midjourney, AI art generator Rhine Research Center ( parapsychology lab George Lewis, “Improvised Music after 1950: Afrological and Eurological Perspectives” ( Abebe Birhane, “Descartes was Wrong: A Person is a Person Through Other Persons” ( Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, ( German philosopher J. R. R. Tolkein, “On Fairy-Stories” ( Martin Buber, [I and Thou](
Episode 126: The Daemon Speaks, with Matt Cardin
Jun 22 2022
Episode 126: The Daemon Speaks, with Matt Cardin
Returning guest Matt Cardin is a writer of fiction and nonfiction whose focus on numinous horror places him in the literary lineage as Arthur Machen and Algernon Blackwood. His new book, What the Daemon Said, collects two decades' worth of meditations on literature, cinema, mysticism, philosophy, and the weird. He joins Phil and JF to talk about a range of topics including dark enlightenment, the idea that fear and trembling are the only sensible reactions to direct exposure to cosmic truth. Header image: detail of cover design for What the Daemon Said, by Dan Sauer Design. Listen to volume 1 ( and volume 2 ( of the Weird Studies soundtrack by Pierre-Yves Martel ( us on Patreon ( Find us on Discord ( the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau ( your Weird Studies merchandise ( (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop ( Cardin's website ( Cardin, What the Daemon Said: Essays on Horror, Fiction, Film and Philosophy ( Cardin, Dark Awakenings ( Cameron, The Artist’s Way Morning Pages Journal ( Natalie Goldberg, Writing Down the Bones ( The Gospel of Thomas ( Matt Cardin, Dark Awakenings ( Robert Frost, “The Figure a Poem Makes” John Horgen, Rational Mysticism ( Weird Studies, Episode 41 with Matt Cardin ( Oswald Chambers, My Utmost for his Highest ( Weird Studies ep. 124 ( Dark Night Radio of the Soul, with Duncan Barford Theodore Roszak ( American scholar M. C. Richards, Centering ( Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols ( Smith ( American religious scholar Martin Buber, [I and Thou]( Lee Hancock (dir.), The Rookie ( (2002) Eckart Tolle ( German spiritual teacher Richard Wagner, Parsifal ( Berger, The Sacred Canopy: Elements of a Sociological Theory of Religion ( Watts ( English writer and teacher Richard Rose, After the Absolute: The Inner Teachings of Richard Rose ( Special Guest: Matt Cardin.
Episode 124: Dark Night Radio of the Soul, with Duncan Barford
May 25 2022
Episode 124: Dark Night Radio of the Soul, with Duncan Barford
For several episodes now, Phil and JF have been circling what St. John of the Cross called the Dark Night of the Soul, that moment in the spiritual journey where all falls a way and an abyss seems to crack open beneath our feet. When it came time to go there in earnest, they could think of no better guide than Duncan Barford, host of the excellent Occult Experiments in the Home podcast. As a master magician, long-time meditator, psychotherapeutic counsellor and writer on spirituality and the occult, Barford is uniquely endowed with the tools, experience, and language to discuss even the most difficult spiritual topics with wisdom and warmth. A Virgil for any Inferno. Buy the Weird Studies soundtrack: Volume 1 ( and Volume 2 ( us on Patreon ( Find us on Discord ( the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau ( your Weird Studies merchandise ( (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop ( NOTES Occult Experiments in the Home ( Duncan Barford's excellent solo podcast Duncan's other website ( focusing on his work as a psychotherapeutic counselor Duncan's books ( on Amazon US Weird Studies, Episode 67 on Hellier ( Immanuel Kant, Critique of Pure Judgement ( Keats, “Ode on a Grecian Urn” ( Dogen’s Bendowa ( Tibetan Book of the Dead ( Daniel Ingram, Mastering the Core Teachings of the Buddha ( St. John of the Cross, Ascent of Mount Carmel ( Spinoza, Ethics ( Lionel Snell, My Years of Magical Thinking ( Special Guest: Duncan Barford.
Episode 122: Spirals and Crooked Lines: On the Star Card in the Tarot
May 11 2022
Episode 122: Spirals and Crooked Lines: On the Star Card in the Tarot
The Star is one of the most iconic of the major trumps of the traditional tarot deck. It is also one of the most ambiguous. A woman is shown emptying two urns of water onto the parched ground. She is flanked by nascent plant life. Shining above her are those nocturnal luminaries whose "eternal silence" so frightened the philosopher Blaise Pascal at the dawn of modernity. Are the stars pointing the way to a brighter future, or are they stars of ill omen, warning us of what lies ahead? And what does that little bird in the background signify? In this episode, Phil and JF try to get to the bottom of the starry heavens, only to find out that starry heavens have no bottom. Click here ( to purchase tickets to the Weird Studies beer launch at Illuminated Brew Works in Chicago on May 23. Buy the Weird Studies soundtrack ( us on Patreon ( Find us on Discord ( the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau ( your Weird Studies merchandise ( (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop ( Known Friend (Valentin Tomberg), Meditations on the Tarot ( Alejandro Jodorowsky, The Way of the Tarot ( Pink Floyd, “Astronomy Domine” Aleister Crowley, The Book of Thoth ( Aleister Crowley, The Book of the Law ( Heimarmene ( Greek goddess of fate Weird Studies, Episode 121 on Mandy ( Ursula K. Le Guin, A Wizard of Earthsea ( Samuel Delaney, Dahlgren ( J R. R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings ( Juan Eduardo Cirlot, A Dictionary of Symbols ( Weird Studies, Episode 103 on the Tower ( Weird Studies, [Episode 114 on the Wheel of Fortune] Joni Mitchell, “Ladies of the Canyon”
Episode 121: Dream Theater: On 'Mandy' and 'The Band Wagon'
Apr 27 2022
Episode 121: Dream Theater: On 'Mandy' and 'The Band Wagon'
In this episode, each of your hosts bullies the other into watching a movie he would normally not touch with a bargepole. Phil has been (unsuccessfully) trying to get JF to watch Vincente Minnelli's 1953 musical comedy The Band Wagon and JF has been (also unsuccessfully) trying to get Phil to watch Panos Cosmatos's 2018 psychedelic horror film Mandy. For this episode, they decided they would compromise and watch both. What started as a goof ended up a fascinating Glass Bead Game from which emerge occulted correspondences between films that, on the surface, could not be more dissimilar. One film is a dream of song and dance, the other a dream of blood and violence. Either way, though, watch out: as Deleuze says, "beware of the dreams of others, because if you are caught in their dream, you are done for." Support us on Patreon ( Find us on Discord ( the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau ( your Weird Studies merchandise ( (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop ( the Weird Studies soundtrack ( NOTES Iluminated Brew Works ( Chicago JF's new course, Groundwork for a Philosophy of Magic (www.nuralearning.com) Vincente Minnelli (dir.), The Bandwagon ( Panos Cosmatos (dir.), Mandy ( Weird Studies, Episode 73 on Carl Jung ( Norman Jewison (dir.), Moonstruck ( David Thompson, The New Biographical Dictionary of Film ( Gilles Deleuze, Cinema 1: The Movement Image ( and Cinema 2: The Time Image ( Henri Bergson, “The Cinematographical Mechanism of Thought and the Mechanistic Illusion” ( from Creative Evolution Terry Gilliam (dir.), The Fisher King ( Claudia Gorbman, [Unheard Melodies: Narrative Film Music]( Raymond Knapp, The American Musical and the Performance of Personal Identity ( Richard Dyer, “Entertainment and Utopia” in Only Entertainment ( Gilles Deleuze, “What is the Creative Act” (
Episode 120: On Radical Mystery
Apr 13 2022
Episode 120: On Radical Mystery
Though it is seldom acknowledged in the weirdosphere, there is a difference between weirdness and mystery. Most the time, the Weird confronts us with a problem, an impersonal epistemic obstacle which we can always hope would go away if we just closed our eyes and whistled past it with our hands in our pockets. Mystery, however, is always personal. It envelops us; it addresses us as persons. Mystery is as present within us as it is out there. It is there when you open your eyes, and even more so when you shut them tight. Maybe it had us in its grip before we were even born. In this episode, JF and Phil make radical mystery the focus of a discussion ranging over everything from unique kinds of tea and spelunking mishaps to antisonic demon pipes and malevolent radiators. Support us on Patreon ( Find us on Discord ( the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau ( your Weird Studies merchandise ( (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop ( the Weird Studies soundtrack ( information on JF's new course, Groundwork for a Philosophy of Magic, go to Nura Learning (www.nuralearning.com). Phil Ford, “Radical Mystery: A Preliminary Account” ( J.F. Martel, “Reality is analog” ( John Keel, The Mothman Prophecies ( Gabriel Marcel, [Being and Having]( Immanuel Kant, Critique of Pure Reason ( Eugene Paul Wigner, “The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics” ( Louis Sass, Madness and Modernism ( Peter Kingsley, Catafalque ( Rudolf Otto, The Idea of the Holy ( Steven Spielberg (dir.), Raiders of the Lost Ark ( Dogen, “Instructions for the Cook” ( Alan Watts, The Way of Zen ( Weird Studies, Episode 56 with Jeremy Johnson (
Episode 119: Behind the Cosmic Curtain: On Stanislaw Lem's 'The New Cosmogony,' with Meredith Michael
Mar 30 2022
Episode 119: Behind the Cosmic Curtain: On Stanislaw Lem's 'The New Cosmogony,' with Meredith Michael
Over the last several centuries, there has been one thing on which science and religion have generally agreed, and that is the fixity of the laws under which the universe came to be. At the moment of the Big Bang or the dawn of the First Day, the underlying principles that govern reality were already set, and they have never changed. But what if the laws of nature were not as chiseled in stone as Western intellectuals on both sides of the magisterial divide have assumed them to be? What if creation was an ongoing process, such that our universe in its beginning might have behaved very differently from how it does at present? This is the central conceit of Stanislaw Lem's story "The New Cosmogony," the capstone of his metafictional collection A Perfect Vacuum, originally published in 1971. In this episode, Meredith Michael joins JF and Phil to discuss the metaphysical implications of the idea that nature is an eternal work-in-progress. Support us on Patreon ( Find us on Discord ( the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau ( your Weird Studies merchandise ( (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop ( the Weird Studies soundtrack ( For more information JF's new course, Groundwork for a Philosophy of Magic, visit Nura Learning ( Lem, “A New Cosmogony” in A Perfect Vacuum ( Weird Studies, Episode 118 The Unseen and Unnamed ( Ramsey Dukes, SSOTBME ( Quentin Meillassoux, After Finitude ( M. John Harrison, The Course of the Heart Michael Harner, The Way of the Shaman ( Richard Dawkins, The Selfish Gene ( Stanislaw Lem, Solaris ( Stanislaw Lem, His Master’s Voice ( David Pruett, Reason and Wonder ( Andrei Tarkovsky (dir.), Solaris ( Philip K. Dick, “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep” ( Andrew W.K., “No One to Know” Special Guest: Meredith Michael.
Episode 118: The Unseen and the Unnamed, with Meredith Michael
Mar 16 2022
Episode 118: The Unseen and the Unnamed, with Meredith Michael
In this episode, Phil and JF are joined by music scholar and Weird Studies assistant Meredith Michael to discuss two strange and unsettling short stories: J.G. Ballard's "The Gioconda of the Twilight Noon" (1964) and Ursula K. Le Guin's "She Unnames Them" (1985). Their plan was to talk about three stories, but they never got to Phil's pick, which will be the focus of episode 119. The reason is that Le Guin and Ballard's stories share surprising resonances that merited close discussion. From opposite perspectives, both tales put words to a region of reality that resists discursive description, a borderland where that which is named reveals its unnamed facet, and that which must remain unseen reveals itself to the inner eye. Support us on Patreon ( Find us on Discord ( the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau ( your Weird Studies merchandise ( (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop ( the Weird Studies soundtrack ( G. Ballard, “The Giaconda of the Twilight Noon,” from The Complete Stories of J. G. Ballard ( K. Le Guin, "She Unnames Them," from The Real and the Uneal ( Hitchcock (dir.), The Birds ( concept of the collective unconscious ( Pater, The Renaissance ( K. Le Guin, “She Unnames Them” in The Real and the Unreal Henri Bergson, Creative Evolution ( C .Richards, Centering ( Studies, Episode 35 on Centering ( Studies, Episode 81 on The Course of the Heart ( Studies, Episode 84 on the Empress ( deprived children ( Ong, Orality and Literacy ( Taylor Coleridge's thoughts on on imagination and fancy can be found in Biographia Literaria ( Special Guest: Meredith Michael.
Episode 116: On 'Blade Runner'
Feb 16 2022
Episode 116: On 'Blade Runner'
In his 1978 bestseller The Selfish Gene, Richard Dawkins described humans as "survival machines" whose sole purpose is the replication of genes. All of culture needed to be understood as a side-effect, if not an epiphenomenon, of that defining function. Four years after Dawkins' book was published, Warner Brothers released Blade Runner, an adaptation of Philip K. Dick's dystopian novel Do Androis Dream of Electric Sheep?. Ridley Scott's film presents us with a different kind of survival machine: the replicant, a technology whose sole function is the replication of human beings. In this episode, Phil and JF discuss the ethical, metaphysical, and aesthetic dimensions of one of the greatest and most prophetic science fiction films of all time. Support us on Patreon ( Find us on Discord ( the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau ( your Weird Studies merchandise ( (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop ( the Weird Studies soundtrack ( Scott (dir.), Blade Runner ( Philip K. Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? ( Philip K. Dick, “The Android and the Human” ( Philip K. Dick, “Man, Android, and Machine” ( Dennis Villeneuve (dir.), Blade Runner 2049 ( Weird Studies, Episode 114 on the Wheel of Fortune ( Scott Bukatman, Blade Runner: BFI Film Classics ( Alan Nourse, [The Bladerunner]( Weird Studies, Episode 115 on Brian Eno ( Richard Dawkins, The Selfish Gene ( Todd Gitlin, The Sixties: Years of Hope, Days of Rage ( Fredric Jameson, Postmodernism or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism ( Weird Studies, Episode 5 on “When Nothing is Cool” ( JF Martel, “Reality is Analog: Philosophizing with Stranger Things” ( John Carpenter (dir,), The Thing ( Beyond Yacht Rock podcast ( Sigmund Freud, “The Uncanny” ( Weird Studies, Episode 86 on “The Sandman” ( Orson Welles (dir.), Touch of Evil ( George Orwell, 1984 (
Episode 114: On the Wheel of Fortune, the Tenth Card of the Tarot
Jan 19 2022
Episode 114: On the Wheel of Fortune, the Tenth Card of the Tarot
Season five kicks off with a new installment in the ongoing series on the Tarot's twenty-two major arcana. This time, your hosts overcome the trials that fortune has dealt them -- a hangover in the case of Phil, a sleepless night for JF -- to discuss the Wheel of Fortune. Not surprisingly, the conversation is a mess, albeit a beautiful one that comes full circle in the end, tying up all its loose ends in something like a bow (or a coiled serpent). Topics include the challenges of improvised philosophical discussion, the importance of exposing oneself to difficult ideas, the serpentine nature of immanentist discourse, and the doctrine of the Fall. As usual, the anomymously-authored Meditations on the Tarot gets pride of place, although occult luminaries such as Alejandro Jodorowsky, Aleister Crowley, and Pat Sajak make notable appearances. Support us on Patreon ( Find us on Discord ( the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau ( your Weird Studies merchandise ( (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop ( the Weird Studies soundtrack ( Known Friend, Meditations on the Tarot ( Pints with Aquinas ( Jaroslav Hašek ( Czech author Lon Milo Duquette, Understanding Aleister Crowley’s Thoth Tarot ( True Detective ( tv show Thomas Ligotti, Conspiracy Against the Human Race ( Henri Bergson, The Two Sources of Morality and Religion ( Alexander Jodorowsky, The Way of Tarot ( Jessica Hundley et. al., Tarot. Library of Esoterica ( Pierre Teilhard de Chardin ( French priest and scientist Herman Hesse, The Glass Bead Game ( Bruno Latour ( French philosopher David Bentley Hart interview (
Episode 113: Framing the Invisible, with Shannon Taggart
Dec 22 2021
Episode 113: Framing the Invisible, with Shannon Taggart
Shannon Taggart's book Seance is a landmark in art photography and the history of psychical research. Taggart spent years photographing practitioners of spiritualism in the U.S. and Europe in an effort to capture the mysteries of mediumship, ectoplasm, and spirit photography. In this episode, she joins JF and Phil for a conversation on the often-misunderstood tradition of spiritualism, the investigation of the paranormal, and the real magic of photography. If the technological medium is the message, then perhaps the spiritual medium is the messenger. Support us on Patreon ( Find us on Discord ( your Weird Studies merchandise ( (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop ( the Weird Studies soundtrack ( Taggart, Séance * Read the introduction to the book here ( Visual companion page for this episode ( Shannon and her work are featured in Peter Bebergal's excellent book, Strange Frequencies: The Extraordinary Story of the Technological Quest for the Supernatural ( Studies, Episode 24 with Lionel Snell ( Lionel Snell, “The Charlatan and the Magus” ( George P. Hansen, The Trickster and the Paranormal ( Diane Arbus ( American photographer Warner Herzog (dir.), Cave of Forgotten Dreams ( Jeffrey Mishlove, Interview with James Tunney on Francis Bacon ( Eva C, ( French medium Andrew Jackson Davis ( American spiritualist Henry Alcott ( American Theosophist For further reading on women, spiritualism, and the art of the invisible: Ann Braude, Radical Spirits ( Guggenheim, Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future ( Special Guest: Shannon Taggart.