Psych Matters

RANZCP

Psych Matters is an informative and educational podcast by The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Psych Matters provides regular interesting topics for psychiatrists, psychiatry trainees and others with an interest in psychiatry.

Disclaimer:
This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics. The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement. By accessing the RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website - RANZCP Website Terms of Use Agreement

Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website - Your Health In Mind

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Music Therapy and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
Today
Music Therapy and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
Music And Psychology & Social connections (MAPS) is an online group program which combines music therapy via therapeutic songwriting and psychology informed by cognitive behaviour therapy for couples affected by younger-onset dementia.  MAPS aims to improve the mental health and social connections in the spousal carers and in the people with younger-onset dementia, with secondary aims to improve coping skills in the spouses and behaviour changes associated with dementia. Link: maps-program@unimelb.edu.auAssociate Professor Samantha Loi, MBBS, BMedSc, MPsych, FRANZCP, GradCertPOA, PhD. is a neuropsychiatrist and old age psychiatrist, involved in clinical research at Neuropsychiatry, Royal Melbourne Hospital and the University of Melbourne.  An advocate for early career psychiatrists and women in academia, she leads a longitudinal study of people with younger-onset neurocognitive disorders (BeYOND).  She is currently funded by an NHMRC Early Career Fellowship and is a past recipient of the RANZCP Early Career Psychiatrist award and Catalyst Foundation award and currently leads the MAPS project.Claire Cadwallader, BSc (Hons), is a PhD (Clinical Neuropsychology) candidate and provisional psychologist from Monash University. She works as a research assistant within the Neuropsychiatry Unit at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, assisting with biomarker and clinical intervention research in younger-onset dementia. She has assisted with the design, and is the psychologist facilitator for the MAPS project. Phoebe Stretton-Smith, MMusThrp, BMus, is a Registered Music Therapist and Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne. Phoebe has over five years clinical and research experience on various projects involving people living with dementia and their family caregivers, including the NHMRC funded Music Interventions for Dementia and Depression in Elderly care (MIDDEL) controlled trial, and research on group therapeutic songwriting funded by the Dementia Australia Research Foundation (DARF). Phoebe contributed to the design of the MAPS program, and is the music therapist facilitator. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Music Therapy and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
Today
Music Therapy and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
Music And Psychology & Social connections (MAPS) is an online group program which combines music therapy via therapeutic songwriting and psychology informed by cognitive behaviour therapy for couples affected by younger-onset dementia.  MAPS aims to improve the mental health and social connections in the spousal carers and in the people with younger-onset dementia, with secondary aims to improve coping skills in the spouses and behaviour changes associated with dementia. Link: maps-program@unimelb.edu.auAssociate Professor Samantha Loi, MBBS, BMedSc, MPsych, FRANZCP, GradCertPOA, PhD. is a neuropsychiatrist and old age psychiatrist, involved in clinical research at Neuropsychiatry, Royal Melbourne Hospital and the University of Melbourne.  An advocate for early career psychiatrists and women in academia, she leads a longitudinal study of people with younger-onset neurocognitive disorders (BeYOND).  She is currently funded by an NHMRC Early Career Fellowship and is a past recipient of the RANZCP Early Career Psychiatrist award and Catalyst Foundation award and currently leads the MAPS project.Claire Cadwallader, BSc (Hons), is a PhD (Clinical Neuropsychology) candidate and provisional psychologist from Monash University. She works as a research assistant within the Neuropsychiatry Unit at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, assisting with biomarker and clinical intervention research in younger-onset dementia. She has assisted with the design, and is the psychologist facilitator for the MAPS project. Phoebe Stretton-Smith, MMusThrp, BMus, is a Registered Music Therapist and Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne. Phoebe has over five years clinical and research experience on various projects involving people living with dementia and their family caregivers, including the NHMRC funded Music Interventions for Dementia and Depression in Elderly care (MIDDEL) controlled trial, and research on group therapeutic songwriting funded by the Dementia Australia Research Foundation (DARF). Phoebe contributed to the design of the MAPS program, and is the music therapist facilitator. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Women's mental health - Time's up!
Aug 4 2022
Women's mental health - Time's up!
In this podcast, Professor Jayashri Kulkarni speaks on the current social context of women's mental health, and the impact this has in our work as psychiatrists. Professor Kulkarni's podcast focusses on problems with the diagnostic term "Borderline Personality Disorder", as well as the hormone impacts on women's mental health. She speaks about new treatments for premenstrual depression, depression related to hormone contraception and finally the difficult to recognise condition of 'Perimenopausal Depression'. This podcast contains some of the topics that Professor Kulkarni covered in her keynote presentation at the RANZCP College Congress in Sydney in 2022.Jayashri Kulkarni AM is a Professor of Psychiatry at Monash University & The Alfred Hospital. In 2002, she founded and continues to direct the Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre (MAPrc) – one Australia’s largest and most innovative centres for clinical mental health research, based at the Alfred Hospital, Melbourne. Professor Kulkarni is also the Head of the Psychiatry Department for the Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University. Jayashri is internationally recognised for her expertise in women’s mental health and in May 2022, with her team of researchers she set up and now directs HER Centre Australia – a Monash University Centre for Health, Education and Research into Women’s Mental Health. This is the first Centre to focus on women’s mental health research in Australia and is a collaboration between Monash University, Alfred Health and Cabrini Health.In September 2021, after 12 months of designing and planning – Professor Kulkarni and her team, launched Australia’s first women’s mental health hospital- based in Cabrini Health.Professor Kulkarni was the President of the International Association for Women’s Mental Health (IAWMH) between 2017-2019. She conducted a multinational study of interpersonal violence and its biopsychosocial and intergenerational impacts on women. Professor Kulkarni has developed many innovative treatments for women with mental illness and is an internationally recognised expert in psychoneuroendocrinology and the neuroscience impacts of early and later life violence against women.Jayashri graduated from Monash Medical School and became a Fellow of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists in 1989. She became a Fellow of the prestigious Australian Academy of Health & Medical Sciences in 2017 and received an Order of Australia in 2019 for her service to psychiatry.She is a regular media commentator on mental health related issues and served on many State and Federal Ministerial Boards and Committees, as well as liaising with Industry. Professor Kulkarni has driven policy change in Victoria over many years and is a passionate advocate of lived experience-focused mental health research. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
The Markers in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Study (The MiND Study)
Jul 21 2022
The Markers in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Study (The MiND Study)
In this episode Professor Mal Hopwood and Dr Dhamidhu Eratne discuss The Markers in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Study. The MiND Study is an Australia-wide research study led by Professor Dennis Velakoulis and Dr Eratne in Neuropsychiatry at The Royal Melbourne Hospital and The University of Melbourne, aiming to develop a routinely available blood test to diagnose (or rule out) dementia and other illnesses quickly and accurately, and transform the care for all people with symptoms and illnesses of the mind and brain.  Many patients with conditions like younger onset dementia, go through years of multiple assessments and investigations, misdiagnosis, conflicting opinions, uncertainty, and delay. Psychiatrists, other specialists, and general practitioners, frequently face the diagnostic dilemma of distinguishing neurodegenerative/neurological from primary psychiatric causes of symptoms.  There is a great need, and much promise, for routine, simple blood tests, which could dramatically improve outcomes, for so many patients, their families, and healthcare systems.MiND - the markers in neuropsychiatric disorders study:    Dr Dhamidhu Eratne is a neuropsychiatrist at Neuropsychiatry, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, and PhD Student and Clinical Research Fellow on the Markers in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Study (The MiND Study), The University of Melbourne. His clinical work mainly involves the assessment, diagnosis and management of younger onset dementia and other severe psychiatric and neurogenetic diseases. Dr Eratne’s PhD is focussed on biomarkers and other markers to reduce diagnostic delay and misdiagnosis, and clinical translation and widely available tests to improve timely and accurate diagnosis, care, and outcomes for patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms. He was awarded the 2021 RANZCP Early Career Psychiatrist Award for his pilot study work, that laid the foundations for significant expansion and broader work of The MiND Study.Professor Malcolm Hopwood is the Ramsay Health Care Professor of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne; based at the Albert Road Clinic (ARC) in Melbourne, Australia. At the ARC, he is the Director of the Professorial Psychiatry Unit.  He has a long track record of research in areas of interest include psychopharmacology and clinical aspects of mood and anxiety disorders.   He was President of the RANZCP between 2015 and 2017 and is now president of the Asian Federation of Psychiatric Associations. In 2020/2021 he was an author of the RANZCP Mood Disorder guidelines, the Beyond Blue Depression and Anxiety Guidelines and Psychotropic Guidelines in Australia.  Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Systematic opportunities and barriers in the context of the major reform of NZ’s health system
Jul 7 2022
Systematic opportunities and barriers in the context of the major reform of NZ’s health system
In this episode of Psych Matters Dr Rees Tapsell, from the Arawa canoe of Ngāti Whakaue descent, describes systemic features affecting Maori mental health, including the impact of the RANZCP’s Te Kaunihera committee, imminent changes to the NZ health system which will see a new Maori Health Authority working alongside Health NZ, and the importance of self-determination for First Nation peoples across the world. Dr Andrew Amos hosted the discussion.Dr Rees Tapsell is of Māori, heralding from the Arawa canoe and of Ngāti Whakaue descent. He is the Executive Director of the Midland Regional Forensic Service and the Director of Clinical Services for the Waikato Mental Health and Addictions services at the Waikato District Health Board. He is a clinical lecturer with the department of psychological medicine at the Auckland School of Medicine. Dr Tapsell has served as a General Council member with the Australia and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists, as a board member on two HHSs/DHBs, on several small private companies and he served as a psychiatrist Deputy Member on the Mental Health Review Tribunal for 12 years. He has been involved in the development of a number of Māori specific approaches to the provision of mental health care to Māori in both general and forensic services and in both government and NGO settings. Dr Tapsell’s particular professional and research interests lie in the governance and leadership of health organisations, the epidemiology of mental disorders, Māori mental health service development, outcome measures in Māori mental health ‘mentally abnormal’ offenders and undergraduate and postgraduate education and training.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Real-world performance of Victorian hospitals during the COVID-19 lockdowns
Jun 23 2022
Real-world performance of Victorian hospitals during the COVID-19 lockdowns
This podcast is a discussion of the performance of the Victorian health system during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, with reference to the Australian and International context for health systems and population mental health. Issues related to managing through adversity, adaptation health, wellbeing, workforce and mental health service data collection are also discussed by Professors Vinay Lakra, Tarun Bastiampillai and Jeffrey Looi.There is forthcoming Australasian Psychiatry paper led by Professor Stephen Allison, together with the podcast presenters and Professor David Copolov that covers the background.Associate Professor Jeffrey Looi, MBBS Syd, MD ANU, DMedSc Melb, FRANZCP, AFRACMA, is a clinical academic neuropsychiatrist, in private and public practice, and Head of the Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine at the Australian National University Medical School. Jeffrey leads the Australian, United States, Scandinavian-Spanish Imaging Exchange (AUSSIE) and the Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA). He has received multiple research and leadership awards including: a Fulbright Scholarship and Australian-Davos-Connection Future Summit Leadership Award. He is an co-author on more than 230 peer-reviewed papers, involving UCLA, Karolinska Institute and University of Melbourne.Associate Professor Vinay LakraAssociate Professor Vinay Lakra is the President of the College. He is also a Clinical Director and a member of the Victorian Board of Medical Board of Australia. He completed his medical and psychiatry training in India. He has had extensive involvement in supporting, training and mentoring SIMGs besides developing the assessment standards for SMIGs.Professor Tarun Bastiampillai, MBBS Adl, BMEDSc Adl, FRANZCP is a consultant psychiatrist and Clinical Professor at both Monash and Flinders University. Tarun is also a member of the Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA). He has served in several senior leadership roles, having been appointed SA Department of Health, Executive Director of Mental Health Strategy between 2015 to 2018. He is the recipient of the RANZCP 2020 Margaret Tobin Award for outstanding achievement in administrative psychiatry. He has published his research extensively including within, high-impact journals - JAMA, Lancet and Molecular Psychiatry.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Autism and Serious Criminal Offending - Part 2
Jun 9 2022
Autism and Serious Criminal Offending - Part 2
Over the years there has been an increasing awareness of the fact that while the vast majority of individuals with autism spectrum conditions are law abiding, some on the spectrum do commit serious acts of violence. In this podcast we look at the core features of autism, explore differences across the spectrum and review the evidence on the link, if any, between autism and serious violence. We also look at the contribution of the core features of autism to the offending cycle and how the condition might affect the individual’s pathway through the criminal justice system.Speakers: Dr Andrew Carroll - forensic psychiatristDr David Thomas - consultant psychiatrist Dr Chad Bennett - psychiatrist Tim Marsh - criminal barristerExpanded show notes including detailed speaker biographies: report referred to: you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Autism and Serious Criminal Offending - Part 1
May 26 2022
Autism and Serious Criminal Offending - Part 1
Over the years there has been an increasing awareness of the fact that while the vast majority of individuals with autism spectrum conditions are law abiding, some on the spectrum do commit serious acts of violence. In this podcast we look at the core features of autism, explore differences across the spectrum and review the evidence on the link, if any, between autism and serious violence. We also look at the contribution of the core features of autism to the offending cycle and how the condition might affect the individual’s pathway through the criminal justice system. Speakers: Dr Andrew Carroll - forensic psychiatristDr David Thomas - consultant psychiatrist Dr Chad Bennett - psychiatrist Tim Marsh - criminal barristerExpanded show notes including detailed speaker biographies : report referred to: you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Remote Psychiatry
May 12 2022
Remote Psychiatry
Remote psychiatry is one part of the diverse practice of regional, rural, and remote psychiatry that is unique to countries such as Australia and New Zealand.  Remote psychiatry brings a number of unique challenges and benefits for clinicians and is not for the faint hearted. Working in resource poor areas, across large geographical areas means that psychiatrists must be adept in providing the whole range of psychiatric skills and expertise to entire communities, differentiating itself from metropolitan practice most familiar with psychiatrists in Australia and New Zealand. Associate Professor Mat Coleman leads today’s discussion from Geraldton in Western Australia, where he calls in from his mobile phone.Joining Mat are Doctors Neil Jeyasingam from Broken Hill, Siva Bala from Cairns and Sela Mulholland from Broome. Mat’s mobile phone connection is less than ideal, but stay with us for this very interesting discussion.Associate Professor Mat Coleman is the Clinical Director of the Great Southern Mental Health Service (WA Country Health Service) based out of Albany WA. He is also the inaugural chair of Rural and Remote Mental Health Practice for the Rural Clinical School WA (University of Western Australia) and is a Commissioner with the National Mental Health Commission. Mat is a member of the Faculty of Addiction Psychiatry, and the Child and Adolescent Faculty of the RANZCP and is the current chair of the Section of Rural Psychiatry.Dr Neil Jeyasingam is the Clinical Director of Far West Local Health District Mental Health Drug and Alcohol. A Senior Clinical Lecturer with Sydney University, his personal website is www.profectuspsych.com.au Dr Selamawit Mulholland is a Stage 3 psychiatry registrar with a passion for remote psychiatry. She has lived and worked in regional and rural Victoria, remote Far North Queensland and remote WA. Dr Siva Bala  is the Chair of the RANZCP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental Health Committee and currently based in Cairns Queensland. He has a certificate of advanced training in Adult Psychiatry and is a member of the Faculty of Forensic Psychiatry. Siva has been an advisor to State and Federal Governments and mental health commissions in Indigenous mental health policy. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
A Conversation with Dr. Hinemoa Elder
Apr 28 2022
A Conversation with Dr. Hinemoa Elder
Dr Elder is the author of Aroha:Māori wisdom for a contented life lived in harmony with our planet and in this episode of Psych Matters facilitated by Dr Andrew Amos, she discussed how spiritual stories of the Māori people can improve the health and wellbeing of psychiatrists and their patients through expanded understanding of the meaning of absolute self-determination, the rhythms of kinship and relationship, and awareness of the world around us.Dr Hinemoa Elder is Māori, of Te Aupōuri, Ngāti Kurī, Te Rarawa and Ngāpuhi descent. Hinemoa is a mother of two adult children. She is a Fellow of the Royal Australia and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists and is a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist working in both District Health Boards and private practice in the fields of community and inpatient child and adolescent psychiatry, youth forensic and neuropsychiatry.  Dr Elder is an advocate for use of Te Reo Māori, the Māori language.Hinemoa was the Māori Strategic Leader for the Centre of Research Excellence (CoRE) for the Ageing Brain based at University of Auckland for the last 6 years. She continues to be involved in research regarding traumatic brain injury, stroke and dementia. She has a PhD (Massey University, 2012) and was recipient of a NZ Health Research Council Eru Pomare Post-Doctoral Fellowship from 2014-2018.Dr Elder is a deputy psychiatrist member of the NZ Mental Health Review Tribunal and a Specialist Assessor under the Intellectual Disability (Compulsory Care and Rehabilitation) Act 2003.  Hinemoa has been a Director of Emerge Aotearoa a national NGO working to support those with mental health, addictions and with social housing since 2015. Hinemoa received the NZ Order of Merit for services to Māori and Psychiatry in 2019. Dr Elder was appointed to the Prime Minister’s Science Advisor’s Cannabis Panel in 2019 for the referendum in 2020. She travelled to Antarctica in late 2019 as part of Homeward Bound, a global leadership programme for women in science. Dr Elder is the author of numerous scientific papers and book chapters. She is a member of the World Psychiatric Association working group of Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists. She is also the Chair of the IACAPAP Indigenous Working Group.  Hinemoa is also the author of ‘Aroha, Māori wisdom for a contented life lived in harmony with our planet’ (Penguin Random House 2020), which has recently been chosen for the Oprah Winfrey Book Club. The book is currently being translated into Arabic.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Violence in Youth - Part 2
Apr 14 2022
Violence in Youth - Part 2
The Section of Child and Adolescent Forensic Psychiatry is comprised of a small group of psychiatrists from around Australia and New Zealand.  It is an active section that hosts the only annual Youth Forensic conference worldwide.  In this podcast, members of the binational committee for Child and Adolescent Youth Forensic Psychiatry discuss violence in Youth. Their discussions will include the historical context in which rates of violence currently exist, the link between violence and various mental health, personality and neurodevelopmental diagnostic groups, and some specific violence interventions being developed in Melbourne. They also talk about assessing risk of violence and the tools that they sometimes use to assess risk and target areas for intervention.  While this is a relatively narrow specialist topic, the point around considering strengths when assessing risk in the absence of known adult function is emphasised during the podcast.Dr James GardinerChair of NZ Branch of the Section of Child and Adolescent Forensic Psychiatry.Dr Adam DeaconConsultant Forensic Child & Adolescent PsychiatristAlfred Health - Youth Forensic Specialist Service Associate Professor John KasinathanMBBS (Hons I; Syd), M.Psychiatry, FRANZCP, Cert. Forensic Psych., M.FMH (UNSW), Cert. Child Adol. Psych. Consultant Forensic, Child, Adolescent and Generalist PsychiatristConjoint Associate Professor, UNSW MedicineClinical Director Adolescent Mental Health, Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network, NSW HealthMedical Director Adolescent and Young Adult Program, Northside Clinic St Leonards  Associate Professor Scott HardenMedical Director Forensic Child and Youth Mental Health Service, Queensland Children’s Hospital and Health ServiceChild, Adolescent and Adult Forensic PsychiatristAssisting Psychiatrist Qld Mental Health CourtDr Enys DelmageConsultant Adolescent Forensic Psychiatrist and Honorary Senior Lecturer at Otago University Dr Brendan DaughertyConsultant Child and Adolescent, General Adult and Forensic PsychiatristStaff Specialist in Adolescent Mental Health, Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network, NSWVisiting Medical Officer, Don Dale Youth Detention Centre, NTDr Annie ParsonsChild, Adolescent and Forensic PsychiatristCobham Youth Justice Centre & Adolescent Court and Community Team,Adolescent Mental Health, Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health NetworkFeedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Violence in Youth - Part 1
Mar 31 2022
Violence in Youth - Part 1
The Section of Child and Adolescent Forensic Psychiatry is comprised of a small group of psychiatrists from around Australia and New Zealand.  It is an active section that hosts the only annual Youth Forensic conference worldwide.  In this podcast, members of the binational committee for Child and Adolescent Youth Forensic Psychiatry discuss violence in Youth.  Their discussions will include the historical context in which rates of violence currently exist, the link between violence and various mental health, personality and neurodevelopmental diagnostic groups, and some specific violence interventions being developed in Melbourne.  They also talk about assessing risk of violence and the tools that they sometimes use to assess risk and target areas for intervention.  While this is a relatively narrow specialist topic, the point around considering strengths when assessing risk in the absence of known adult function is emphasised during the podcast. Dr James GardinerChair of NZ Branch of the Section of Child and Adolescent Forensic Psychiatry.Dr Adam Deacon Consultant Forensic Child & Adolescent PsychiatristAlfred Health - Youth Forensic Specialist Service Associate Professor John Kasinathan MBBS (Hons I; Syd), M.Psychiatry, FRANZCP, Cert. Forensic Psych., M.FMH (UNSW), Cert. Child Adol. Psych.Consultant Forensic, Child, Adolescent and Generalist PsychiatristConjoint Associate Professor, UNSW MedicineClinical Director Adolescent Mental Health, Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network, NSW HealthMedical Director Adolescent and Young Adult Program, Northside Clinic St Leonards  Associate Professor Scott HardenMedical Director Forensic Child and Youth Mental Health Service, Queensland Children’s Hospital and Health ServiceChild, Adolescent and Adult Forensic PsychiatristAssisting Psychiatrist Qld Mental Health CourtDr Enys DelmageConsultant Adolescent Forensic Psychiatrist and Honorary Senior Lecturer at Otago University Dr Brendan Daugherty Consultant Child and Adolescent, General Adult and Forensic PsychiatristStaff Specialist in Adolescent Mental Health, Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network, NSWVisiting Medical Officer, Don Dale Youth Detention Centre, NTDr Annie ParsonsChild, Adolescent and Forensic PsychiatristCobham Youth Justice Centre & Adolescent Court and Community Team,Adolescent Mental Health, Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health NetworkFeedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Leadership and management for psychiatrists during and post COVID-19
Mar 17 2022
Leadership and management for psychiatrists during and post COVID-19
The year 2020 will be remembered as the year of the most significant global pandemic since the Spanish influenza.   Our mental health system is chronically strained and health professionals regularly struggle with burnout, at the best of times. The workforce shortage has consistently impacted the care provided to patients and COVID-19 introduced additional challenges. At international, national and community levels, leaders across all sectors have been required to respond to both direct and indirect effects of the COVID-19 crisis, with little time for preparation, and in a constantly changing environment. In this podcast, influential leaders in the field discuss some leadership strategies and talk through ongoing challenges and ways of working with the system and collaborating with relevant stakeholders to drive change in the best interests of doctors and patients. Dr Murray Wright is the Chief Psychiatrist at NSW Ministry of Health and has maintained a private practice since 1990, and has a longstanding relationship with NSW Police, providing clinical advice and support to the Negotiation and Fixated Persons Units.Dr Astha Tomar is Chair, Victorian Branch, RANZCP and Head of Youth, Peninsula Health, and a Member of the Mental Health Ministerial Advisory Committee, Victoria. She has worked extensively with various committees and groups at a state and national level to engage psychiatrists in clinical leadership, healthcare governance, system development and advocate for systemic change and improvement. She is currently working on a Leadership development program for psychiatrists. Dr Ruth Vine is Australia’s first Deputy Chief Medical Officer for Mental Health. Ruth provides policy advice on critical mental health issues impacting the Australian community due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and champions Commonwealth policy development and implementation activities to better integrate the Australian mental health system. Ruth is a consultant psychiatrist and has more than 25 years’ experience. Ruth has worked for the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services, and has held positions of Deputy Chief Psychiatrist, Chief Psychiatrist and Director of Mental Health. She has chaired the AHMAC National Mental Health Standing Committee, the National Mental Health Workforce Committee, and National Safety and Quality Committee. Ruth  is a member of the board of Forensicare, the Board of Mind and the Victorian Medical Practitioners Board (Victoria).Dr Nardine Elzahaby is an early career psychiatrist at Austin health, runs a telehealth private practice and is the co-founder and co-owner of IMG SOS. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Fighting for their lives
Mar 3 2022
Fighting for their lives
The execution of individuals with mental disorder is prohibited by international law, such that the presence of mental disorder, and how it is dealt with during the investigatory or trial and sentencing process, may render a conviction legally unsafe.  Although legal principles designed to protect those with mental disorder from the death penalty are not in dispute, for them to operate mental health professionals must be both equipped with relevant clinico-ethico-legal expertise and be prepared to engage in the process. Engaging in such cases represents the most extreme focus of the usual clinical, legal and ethical issues involved in all evaluations for criminal courts. Crucial to not avoiding engagement in such cases must be the recognition that they do not raise ‘different’ issues for forensic practitioners but merely offer extreme representations of those issues.  Dr Jay Sarkar is a Consultant with Victorian Institute of Forensic Mental Health, Forensicare and Spectrum Personality Disorder Service, Melbourne. He was previously an Adjunct Assistant Professor in Singapore. He has a particular interest in capital cases and provided expert testimony in over 100 cases and counting. His testimony has helped prevent deaths of many. Dr Danny Sullivan is a UK and Australian-trained forensic psychiatrist, currently Executive Director of Clinical Services of Forensicare, the statewide Victorian forensic mental health service. He has provided expert evidence in criminal matters in may jurisdictions for 20 years. Over recent years he has been involved with the Capital Punishment Justice Project and Project 39A, providing training to clinicians and the judiciary in India to address access to mental health assessment, treatment, and expert evidence for those subject to the death penalty.Associate Professor John KasinathanConsultant Forensic, Child, Adolescent and Generalist PsychiatristConjoint Associate Professor, UNSW MedicineClinical Director Adolescent Mental Health, Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network, NSW HealthMedical Director Adolescent and Young Adult Program, Northside Clinic St Leonards ResourcesCPJP – Standing for a world without the death penalty Project 39A — Deathworthy Ashford J and Kupferberg M (2013) Death Penalty Mitigation: A Handbook for Mitigation Specialists, Investigators, Social scientists and Lawyers.  Oxford University Press, New YorkDeMatteo D, Murrie D, Anumba N and Keesler M (2011) Forensic Mental Health Assessments in Death Penalty Cases. Oxford University Press, New YorkEastman N, Krljes S, Latham R and Lyall M (2018) Handbook of Forensic Psychiatric Practice in Capital Cases, Second Edition, Death Penalty Project, London.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Forward with Dementia
Feb 17 2022
Forward with Dementia
In this episode of Psych Matters, Professor Lee-Fay Low is joined by Professor Henry Brodaty, Associate Professor Lyn Phillipson and Dr Meredith Gresham to discuss how to tell someone they have dementia, the evidence for post-diagnostic treatments and support, and the resources available at Lee-Fay Low is Professor in Ageing and Health, University of Sydney. She is a registered psychologist and conducts research on rehabilitation and dementia, stigma, and interventions to improve quality of life of older people.Professor Henry Brodaty is a researcher, clinician, policy advisor and strong advocate for people with dementia and their carers.  At UNSW Sydney, he is Scientia Professor of Ageing and Mental Health, Co-Director of the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing, and Director, Dementia Centre for Research Collaboration. He has published extensively, is a senior psychogeriatrician at Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney. He serves on multiple committees for the NSW and Australian governments and WHO.Lyn Phillipson is an Associate Professor in Public Health at University of Wollongong. Lyn has expertise in promoting understanding and change to support the creation of dementia friendly communities, improve respite for carers of people with dementia and improve dementia help-seeking and service utilisation . Dr Meredith Gresham is an Occupational Therapist with over 35 years clinical and research experience. Her practice has focused on dementia care in residential aged care, hospitals, community, rehabilitation and palliative care settings.   Links:Forward with Dementia you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Mental illness in adults with intellectual disability: Assessment
Feb 3 2022
Mental illness in adults with intellectual disability: Assessment
The prevalence of intellectual disability ( or ID) in Australia is about 1 to 2% of the population and it is now recognized that not only do adults with an ID experience substantially higher rates of mental health problems than the rest of the population, but they also have difficulties in getting these needs met because of the range of barriers to people in accessing mental health services. These barriers are discussed in this podcast along with suggestions as to how professionals can approach looking after people with intellectual disability and mental health problems.Dr Nick O’ConnorClinical Lead, Mental Health Patient Safety Program, NSW Clinical Excellence CommissionProfessor Julian Trollor Chair, Intellectual Disability Mental Health and Head, Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry (3DN), School of Psychiatry, UNSW Medicine and Health, UNSW SydneyPresident, Australian Association of Developmental Disability Medicine Dr Catherine Franklin Psychiatrist and Director of the Mater Intellectual Disability and Autism ServiceDirector of a University of Queensland Research Centre for Intellectual and Developmental Disability Vice-President of the Australian Association for Developmental Disability MedicineDr Chad BennettConsultant Psychiatrist and Clinical Director at the Victorian Dual Disability ServiceDr David BathgateConsultant Forensic Psychiatrist at the Southern District Health Board Dunedin New ZealandTahli HindProject Administrator, Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry (3DN), School of Psychiatry, UNSW Medicine and Health, UNSW SydneyPassionate Disability AdvocateMs Claire EaglesonProject Officer, Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry (3DN), School of Psychiatry, UNSW Medicine and Health, UNSW SydneyClaire is a Project Officer at 3DN with a background in psychology. She manages various projects that aim to improve workforce and education capacity in intellectual disability mental health. One such project involved working with the RANZCP to examine workforce and future training capacity in this area. She is working with Tahli to support her in her role at 3DN, gaining valuable experience in using a co-design approach.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Why Train in Psychiatry?
Jan 20 2022
Why Train in Psychiatry?
Dr Fiona Wilkes, Stage 2 Psychiatry Trainee, Dr Angus Finlay, Stage 3 Advanced Trainee, and Professor Jeffrey Looi, Psychiatrist, discuss their experiences in choosing and training in Psychiatry as a career. They discuss the process of choosing psychiatric training, experiences of training, the nature of the work with people suffering from mental illness, and the varied career possibilities within psychiatry. Listeners might also be interested in the related Psych Matters podcast “Challenges for early career psychiatrists”, which discusses early career matters, including work-life balance. Associate Professor Jeffrey Looi, MBBS Syd, MD ANU, DMedSc Melb, FRANZCP, AFRACMA, is a clinical academic neuropsychiatrist, in private and public practice, and Head of the Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine at the Australian National University Medical School. Jeffrey leads the Australian, United States, Scandinavian-Spanish Imaging Exchange (AUSSIE) and the Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA). He has received multiple research and leadership awards including: a Fulbright Scholarship and Australian-Davos-Connection Future Summit Leadership Award. He is an co-author on more than 220 peer-reviewed papers, involving UCLA, Karolinska Institute and University of Melbourne.Dr Fiona Wilkes, BSc (Hons), MChD, PhD (ANU) is a Stage 2 psychiatry trainee in Canberra and researcher and Associate Clinical Lecturer at the ANU Medical School. Her research interests are in neuroscience and how the brain influences behaviour. This began with her psychology undergraduate degree and spans honours in honeybee brains, a PhD in neuroanatomical changes in Huntington disease, and work as a doctor in neurosurgery and then psychiatry. She also has a miniature Australian bulldog, practices Iyengar yoga, and speaks a little German. Dr Angus Finlay is the Academic Fellow at the Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine within the Australian National University Medical School, and an Advanced Trainee in the Consultation-Liaison Service at Canberra Hospital. He is an enthusiastic promoter of clinical psychiatry, research and clinical teaching, both within mental health services and across the general hospital. His research interests include psychiatric epidemiology, climate change and mental health, and medical education.SAGE JournalsMembers login to RANZCP.org and access journals. Search for these titles on the Journals website: Why it’s worthwhile training as a psychiatrist  (Jeffrey CL Looi, Angus JF Finlay)Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Social Cultural and Rehabilitation Psychiatry
Jan 6 2022
Social Cultural and Rehabilitation Psychiatry
In this episode of Psych Matters, Dr Tanveer Ahmed and Dr Elizabeth Moore discuss the work and significance of the social, cultural and rehabilitation section of the College.Dr Tanveer Ahmed is a Sydney based psychiatrist, author and columnist. He works in both the private and public sectors, including as a Staff Specialist at Bankstown Community Health.  Dr Elizabeth Moore is the Coordinator General of the Office for Mental Health and Wellbeing and the President elect of the RANZCP. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
2021 End of year message
Dec 23 2021
2021 End of year message
As 2021 draws to a close, the Psych Matters team would like to thank you for your support during the year. We hope that you’ve enjoyed the many topics presented during 2021, and we look forward to bringing many more to you in 2022.We would especially like to thank College members and others who have generously given their time to develop and present Psych Matters, and we thank the management and staff of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists for supporting the team in bringing this podcast to you.Have a great break and stay safe. We’ll be back on the 7th of January with the next episode of Psych Matters.Speaker: Jo-Rose FatoProducer: David BealFeedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Specialist International Medical Graduates: Transition to Practice
Dec 9 2021
Specialist International Medical Graduates: Transition to Practice
In this episode of Psych Matters, Dr Vinay Lakra is joined by Dr Sidney Cabral, Dr Alida Connell and Dr Ajay Vijayakrishnan to discuss specialist international medical graduates transitioning to practice.Associate Professor Vinay Lakra Associate Professor Vinay Lakra is the President of the College. He is also a Clinical Director and a member of the Victorian Board of Medical Board of Australia. He completed his medical and psychiatry training in India. He has had extensive involvement in supporting, training and mentoring SIMGs besides developing the assessment standards for SMIGs.Dr Sidney CabralSidney  works as Deputy Director of Training Queensland and Director of Training for Central and Southern Cluster. His focus is on supporting Trainees and International Medical Graduates from metropolitan and regional areas and has taken the lead in developing online resources for Queensland Trainees including the PGT website.He has always had an interest in medical education and was awarded the Deans Award for Excellence in Teaching, Newcastle University, NSW in 2005. He has been a member of several training-related committees and is currently the Chair of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatry Federal Partial Comparability Assessment and Review Panel (PCARP).Sidney is passionate about working with patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and has a clinical role with the State-wide Queensland Transcultural Mental Health Service. Dr Alida Connell MBChB (Pret), DMH (CMSA), FCPsych (CMSA), MMed (Stell), FRANZCP (RANZCP). Dr Alida Connell trained and practiced as a General Practitioner before qualifying as a Fellow Psychiatrist of the South African College of Medicine and obtaining a  Master’s in Medicine for her research in the field of  Psychiatry.   Currently she practices in the private health sector and provides telepsychiatric services to adults.    Dr Ajay Vijayakrishnan MRCPsych, FHEA, FRANZCPA general adult psychiatrist with a special interest in psychoanalytic psychotherapy, trained at St George’s and Charing Cross in London, UK; previously a substantive Consultant in the NHS and later in India; currently working across public and private health in Melbourne.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Electro Convulsive Therapy
Nov 25 2021
Electro Convulsive Therapy
In this episode of Psych Matters, Professor Colleen Loo and Dr Brett Simpson discuss Electro Convulsive Therapy.Professor Colleen Loo is a clinical psychiatrist and Professor of Psychiatry at the University of New South Wales, Sydney; Australia. She is an internationally recognised clinical expert and researcher in the field of ECT, ketamine and novel brain stimulation treatments (rTMS, tDCS) for depression. Her research spans laboratory neuroscience, clinical research and clinical trials. She has contributed to Australian and international treatment guidelines and policy. Dr Brett Simpson is an old-age psychiatrist practicing in Sydney. He has extensive clinical experience in ECT and directs both a public and private ECT service. He is a member of the NSW ECT working party responsible for the production and revision of the NSW ECT Minimum Standards. He has taught ECT courses for more than 10 years.Links:Gold Coast Health video  you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.