PODCAST

Living God's Way with Scott LaPierre

Scott LaPierre

Scott LaPierre (https://www.scottlapierre.org/) is a senior pastor, author, and conference speaker. This podcast includes his conference messages, guest preaching, and expository sermons at Woodland Christian Church. Each of Scott’s messages is the result of hours of studying the Bible. Scott and his wife, Katie, grew up together in northern California, and God has blessed them with eight children. View all of Pastor Scott’s books on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Scott-LaPierre/e/B01JT920EQ. Receive a FREE copy of Scott’s book, “Seven Biblical Insights for Healthy, Joyful, Christ-Centered Marriages.” For Scott LaPierre’s conference and speaking information, including testimonies, and endorsements, please visit: https://www.scottlapierre.org/conferences-and-speaking/. Feel free to contact Scott at: https://www.scottlapierre.org/contact/.
Husbands Live with Your Wives in an Understanding Way
Peter commands, "Likewise, husbands, live with your wives in an understanding way, showing honor to the woman as the weaker vessel, since they are heirs with you of the grace of life, so that your prayers may not be hindered" (1 Peter 3:7). After Peter commands wives to submit to their husbands, he tells husbands how to treat their wives in an understanding way so as not to abuse the authority given to them. Also, two husbands in the Old Testament serve as examples for husbands to learn from, and that's Jacob and Elkanah. https://youtu.be/h5JqpMHZKQI 1 Peter 3:7 commands, "Husbands live with your wives in an understanding way, showing honor to the woman as the weaker vessel." This is the fourth message I deliver at Marriage God’s Way ConferencesReceive a FREE copy of my book, Seven Biblical Insights for Healthy, Joyful, Christ-Centered Marriages.Visit my speaking page for conference and speaking information, including testimonies, endorsements, and contact info.Have a Marriage God’s Way Conference in the privacy of your own home. Download and print the handout that’s given to attendees. Table of ContentsMessage Lessons for Husbands Live with Your Wives in an Understanding WayDiscussion Questions for Husbands Live with Your Wives in an Understanding WayMessage Notes for Husbands Live with Your Wives in an Understanding WayLesson 1: Remember listening is not enoughLesson 2: Husbands treat their wives well by (Part I) learning themLesson 2: Husbands treat their wives well by (Part III) honoring themLesson 2: Husbands treat their wives well by (Part III) recognizing they’re the weaker vesselLesson 2: Husbands treat their wives well by (Part IV) being spiritual menLesson 3: Husbands mistreat their wives by (Part I) responding in angerLesson 3: Husbands mistreat their wives by (Part II) responding in pride Message Lessons for Husbands Live with Your Wives in an Understanding Way Lesson 1: Remember listening is ______ ____________ (Matthew 7:24-27; Luke 8:21; John 13:17; James 1:22, 4:17).Lesson 2: Husbands treat their wives well by:(Part I) ________________ them (1 Peter 3:7a).(Part II) ________________ them (1 Peter 3:7b).(Part III) Recognizing they’re the ____________ ____________ (1 Peter 3:7c).(Part IV) Being __________________ ______ (1 Peter 3:7d; Matthew 7:19; Luke 13:7).Lesson 3: Husbands mistreat their wives by:(Part I) Responding in __________ (Genesis 30:1–2).(Part II) Responding in __________ (1 Samuel 1:6–8; Proverbs 25:20). Discussion Questions for Husbands Live with Your Wives in an Understanding Way Husband asks wife:Do you feel like I strive to learn about you and understand you?Do you feel like I honor you for your femininity?Do you feel like I make your submission easier by being a spiritual man?Do you feel like I respond to you in anger or pride?Wife asks husband:Do you feel like I try to be a consistent wife so it’s easier to understand me?Do you feel like I strive to be feminine?Thinking about the account with Rachel and Jacob, do you feel like I:Act melodramatically like she did?Take my frustrations out on you?Covet what other women have? Message Notes for Husbands Live with Your Wives in an Understanding Way As we begin this message, I want to pause our discussion of marriage for an important lesson, or else all the instruction we’re receiving won’t make much – if any – difference… Lesson 1: Remember listening is not enough There’s been a lot of teaching and application up to this point, and while we come to our second to last message I think it’s really important to keep this in mind. I’d like to try to explain something I saw in teaching and coaching… When I taught elementary school, I would stand up at the board and as clearly as possible I’d try to explain to students what they were supposed to do. Then I’d encourage the students to try to do it on their own and I’d walk around the room and look over their shoulders to see how they were doing.
Oct 9 2020
1 hr 4 mins
Let the Wife See that She Respects Her Husband (Ephesians 5:33)
"Nevertheless let each husband in particular so love his own wife as himself, and let the wife see that she respects her husband" (Ephesians 5:33). Husbands are commanded to love their wives, but wives are commanded to respect their husbands. Learn why there are two different commands, and what this difference means for men and women. Can a wife love her husband without respecting him? Also learn what it means for a wife to respect her husband and what it means for a wife to disrespect her husband. https://youtu.be/wAsCrQgBVAI "Let the wife see that she respects her husband" (Ephesians 5:33). What does it look like for wives to respect and disrespect their husbands? This is the fifth message I deliver at Marriage God’s Way Conferences.Receive a FREE copy of my book, Seven Biblical Insights for Healthy, Joyful, Christ-Centered Marriages.Visit my speaking page for conference and speaking information, including testimonies, endorsements, and contact info.Have a Marriage God’s Way Conference in the privacy of your own home. Download and print the handout that’s given to attendees. Table of ContentsMessage Lessons for Wife See that She Respects Her HusbandDiscussion Questions for Wife See that She Respects Her HusbandMessage Notes for Wife See that She Respects Her HusbandLesson 1: husbands must feel like their wives respect themLesson 2: wives can love their husbands without respecting themLesson 3: disrespect can change a husband’s feelings toward his wifeLesson 4: husbands can make respecting them easierLesson 5: wives respect their husbands by making their spiritual leadership easier Message Lessons for Wife See that She Respects Her Husband Lesson 1: Husbands must feel like their wives ______________ ________ (Ephesians 5:33; Proverbs 31:11–12, 23).Lesson 2: Wives can ________ their husbands without ____________________ them (1 Samuel 18:20; 1 Peter 3:5; 2 Samuel 6:16, 20–22).Lesson 3: Disrespect can ____________ a husband’s ________________ toward his wife (2 Samuel 6:23, 3:12-13).Lesson 4: Husbands can make respecting ________ ____________.Lesson 5: Wives respect their husbands by making their _________________ _____________________ easier. Discussion Questions for Wife See that She Respects Her Husband Husband asks wife:Do you feel like my feelings toward you have changed in a positive way from you respecting me, or in a negative way from you disrespecting me?What do I do that makes it easier for you to respect me?What do I do that makes it harder for you to respect me?Do you feel like I withhold affection from you like David did with Michal?Wife asks husband:Do you feel like I respect you?What do I do that makes you feel respected?What do I do that makes you feel disrespected?Do you feel like I talk down to you like Michal did with David? Message Notes for Wife See that She Respects Her Husband Let’s look at Ephesians 5:33… 33 Nevertheless let each one of you in particular so love his own wife as himself, and let the wife see that she respects her husband. Because most of us are pretty familiar w/ this verse, we lose some of the impact of what it’s saying. So let me try to establish what we would EXPECT it to say if we weren’t so familiar w/ it… Since Paul just finished commanding husbands to love their wives, so you would expect verse 33 to say… Let each one of you in particular love his own wife as himself, and LET THE WIFE LOVE HER HUSBAND AS HERSELF. That’s what you’d expect the verse to say, but notice it doesn’t say anything about wives loving their husbands. Even though husbands are commanded to love their wives, wives are not commanded to love their husbands. Now before we go any further, let me make an important point… I’m not saying men don’t want to be loved and I’m not saying women don’t want to be respected. Men want to be loved and women want to be respected, and there are verses in the NT commanding wives to love their husbands and commanding husbands to ...
Oct 10 2020
1 hr 28 mins
When You Fall Into Various Trials and How You Can Prepare for Them
James 1:2 says, "Count it all joy when you fall into various trials." Notice it says WHEN you fall into various trials instead of “IF you fall into various trials.” We’re going to face trials. What can we do to ensure we're prepared for them when they come? How can we have a foundation that prevents us from being destroyed when the storms of life occur? Asa, King of Judah, provides a good example for Christians to learn from. What happens when the enemy (cancer, financial problems, rebellious children) isn't defeated? How do we find victory in Christ? https://youtu.be/27kNQNDk6eU James 1:2 says, "When you fall into various trials." We’re going to face trials. What can we do to ensure we're prepared for them? This is the first message I deliver at Enduring Trials God’s Way Conferences. Download and print the print the handout that’s given to attendees to have a conference in the privacy of your own home.Visit my speaking page for conference and speaking information, including testimonies, endorsements, and contact info.Receive a FREE copy of my book, Seven Biblical Insights for Healthy, Joyful, Christ-Centered Marriages. Table of ContentsMessage Lessons for When You Fall Into Various Trials and How You Can Prepare for ThemFamily Worship Guide for When You Fall Into Various Trials and How You Can Prepare for ThemMessage Notes for When You Fall Into Various Trials and How You Can Prepare for ThemLesson 1: Expect trials!Lesson 2: Trials are unpredictable, but not accidents.Lesson 3: A Strong foundation is needed. Lesson 4: Build during times of peace.Lesson 5: Jesus provided victory over the greatest enemy. Message Lessons for When You Fall Into Various Trials and How You Can Prepare for Them Lesson 1: ____________ ____________ (James 1:2a; 1 Peter 4:12; John 16:33).Lesson 2: Trials are __________________________, but not accidents (James 1:2b).Lesson 3: A strong ____________________ is needed (Matthew 7:24-27).Lesson 4: Build during __________ of __________ (2 Chronicles 14:2-12).Lesson 5: ____________ provided ______________ over the greatest enemy (1 Corinthians 15:26, 15-57; Revelation 20:14). Family Worship Guide for When You Fall Into Various Trials and How You Can Prepare for Them Why should it be encouraging to remember God is in control while you are in the middle of a trial?Have you been “building your walls” during times of peace? If yes, how? If not, how will you build in the future?What daily trials do you experience that you need to be aware of, because of their potential to make you collapse?During trials, what characteristics of God can you focus on to help you better endure trials? Write down a verse (or two) to memorize that reveals this characteristic.Unbelievers and some genuine believers ask, “Why would a loving God __?” How would you answer this question, considering 1 Peter 3:15 says we must “always be ready to give a defense to everyone who asks [for] areason for the hope that is in” us?Read 1 Corinthians 15:26-57. what encouragement can you take from these verses? What enemy did Jesus defeat, and how did He defeat it? Message Notes for When You Fall Into Various Trials and How You Can Prepare for Them I’d like to share a story w/ you that Rachel shared w/ us when we were at the hospital w/ her soon after she received her cancer diagnosis… She said that only a few weeks ago she was at her house, sitting with her feet in the kiddy pool, watching her kids, thinking: The point is: things can change quickly. We have to be prepared for trials! Please listen to this verse… James 1:2 My brethren, count it all joy WHEN you fall into various trials Notice James said WHEN versus “IF you fall into various trials.”  And this brings us to Lesson 1… Lesson 1: Expect trials! We’re going to face trials. They will come. 1 Peter 4:12 says, “Beloved, do not think it strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you, AS THOUGH SOME STRANGE THING HAPPENED TO YOU.
Oct 11 2020
50 mins
Bear Fruit Worthy of Repentance (Matthew 3:8 & Luke 3:8)
John the Baptist commanded the multitudes to bear fruit worthy of repentance (Matthew 3:8 and Luke 3:8). This verse helps reveal the most common reason people fail regarding repentance. They put off without putting on. They stop the sin without starting the accompanying behavior God wants. Manasseh, the evilest king of Judah, surprisingly is a great example of repentance, as well as a tremendous vessel of God's mercy and forgiveness. https://youtu.be/boFipYX3MN8 "Bear fruit worthy of repentance" (Matthew 3:8 & Luke 3:8). This reveals why people fail regarding repentance: they put off without putting on. Table of ContentsLessons for Bear Fruit Worthy of RepentanceFamily Worship Guide for Bear Fruit Worthy of RepentanceSermon Notes for Bear Fruit Worthy of RepentanceLesson 1: In affliction you can harden or humble yourself.Lesson 2: Genuine repentance bears fruit.Lesson 3: Forgiveness doesn’t mean no consequences (part I) we might not be able to undo what we did.Lesson 3: Forgiveness doesn’t mean no consequences (part II) for others.Lesson 3: Forgiveness doesn’t mean no consequences (part III) our kids might carry on our sins.Lesson 4: Manasseh shows God’s mercy knows no bounds. Lessons for Bear Fruit Worthy of Repentance Lesson 1: In affliction you can harden or humble yourself.Lesson 2: Genuine repentance bears fruit.Lesson 3: Forgiveness doesn’t mean no consequences:(Part I) We might not be able to undo what we did.(Part II) For others.(Part III) Our kids might carry on our sins.Lesson 4: Manasseh shows God’s mercy knows no bounds. Family Worship Guide for Bear Fruit Worthy of Repentance Day 1: Read 2 Chronicles 16:7-12 and discuss: How did Asa respond to God in the midst of his affliction? Can you discuss a time you were afflicted and you humbled yourself? What about a time you hardened yourself? What can you do to ensure you humble, versus harden, yourself when suffering? Day 2: Read Matthew 3:8, Luke 3:8; Ephesians 4:22-32; Colossians 3:8-12 and discuss: How do we know if repentance is genuine? Why do many people fail when it comes to repentance/producing lasting change? What is a temptation you struggle with? To develop victory in this area, what do you need to “put on,” or in other words, what fruit needs to be produced in its place? Day 3: Read 2 Chronicles 33:1-21 and discuss: What is forgiveness? What does forgiveness not mean? What consequences were in Manasseh and the Jews’ lives as a result of Manasseh’s sins? Can you think of other people in Scripture who repented, were forgiven, but still suffered consequences? Despite Manasseh’s wickedness, why is the end of his life so encouraging? What does Manasseh teach us about God’s forgiveness and mercy, or another way to say it is: what do we learn about Christ’s sacrifice? Sermon Notes for Bear Fruit Worthy of Repentance The title of this morning’s sermon is, “Fruit Worthy of Repentance.” We’re going to look at one of the evilest men who ever lived. I can’t think of anyone, Jew or Gentile, that approached the wickedness Manasseh engaged in throughout his lifetime. Please turn to 2 Chronicles 33:1… 2 Chronicles 33:1 Manasseh was twelve years old when he became king, and he reigned fifty-five years in Jerusalem. That's the longest reign of any king in the OT. Just to put this in perspective, Saul, David, and Solomon each reigned 40 yrs. 2 Chronicles 33:2 But he did evil in the sight of the Lord, according to the abominations of the nations whom the Lord had cast out before the children of Israel. 3 For he (Manasseh) rebuilt the high places which Hezekiah his father had broken down; he raised up altars for the Baals, and made wooden images; and he worshiped ALL THE HOST OF HEAVEN and served them. He worshipped everything you could worship EXCEPT God. Now for a moment, let me pause our reading about Manasseh, so I can share something w/ you that will give context for what we just read… Manasseh’s father was Hezekiah.
Oct 17 2020
1 hr 4 mins
The Consequences of Poor Spiritual Leadership
The consequences of poor spiritual leadership are shown well through Jacob's decision to settle his family in Shechem. Jacob's family, especially his daughter, Dinah, suffered because of his poor spiritual leadership. He planted his family at Shechem, never considering the terrible spiritual, physical, mental, and emotional consequences. What can men learn from Jacob's mistakes? How can fathers and husbands - as well as sons growing up to be men - do to avoid some of these same mistakes? https://youtu.be/2JI_Xx6BYqs The consequences of poor spiritual leadership are shown well through Jacob's decision to settle his family in Shechem in Genesis 34. Table of ContentsLessons for the Consequences of Poor Spiritual LeadershipFamily Guide for the Consequences of Poor Spiritual LeadershipNotes for Sermon on the Consequences of Poor Spiritual LeadershipLesson 1: sacrifice is no substitute for obedience.Lesson 2: a father’s compromise endangers his family.Lesson 3: the world wants to assimilate our families.Lesson 4: a father’s passivity causes problems.Lesson 5: a father must protect his family.Lesson 6: sin ruins our witness.Lesson 7: (part I) it’s never too late for a father to lead…Lesson 7: (part I) it’s never too late for a father to lead (part II) and when he does, his family often follows. Lessons for the Consequences of Poor Spiritual Leadership Lesson 1: __________________ is no substitute for obedience (Gen 31:13 cf. Gen 33:20; 1 Sam 15:22). Lesson 2: A father’s ____________________ endangers his family (Gen 34:1). Lesson 3: The __________ __________ to assimilate our families (Gen 34:8-10). Lesson 4: A fathers’ _________________ causes problems (Gen 34:6-14, 3:17, 16:2). Lesson 5: A father ________ ______________ his family (Gen 34:3-19). Lesson 6: ______ __________ our witness (Gen 33:20 cf. Gen 34:30).Lesson 7: (Part I) It’s __________ too ________ for a father to lead (Part II) and when he does his family __________ ______________ (Gen 35:1-4; Matt 11:28-30). Family Guide for the Consequences of Poor Spiritual Leadership Day 1: Read Genesis 31:13, 33:18-20 and discuss: Examine yourself. What was the last thing that God clearly revealed to you, through the Holy Spirit and His Word? Are you still walking in obedience? Or, is there need for repentance? Day 2: Read Genesis 34 and discuss: What are some clear examples of lines you’ve drawn with your family (or, as a non-father: lines that have been drawn in your family)? What is the reason for these boundaries? Does your family understand why there are certain things that are off-limits in your household? Recount an example from your past (or someone you know) of compromise and/or world assimilation. Discuss the lessons your family could learn from this situation. Day 3: Read Genesis 35:1-4 and discuss: Examine yourself (whether you are a father or not). What sin(s) used to characterize your life? What sin is something that you are actively trying to put-off, but is not completely put-off, yet? What sin do you need to repent of? What do you need to seek forgiveness for? When was the last time you confessed sin to someone else in your family (or to a close friend)? When you feel discouraged because of sin, what kind of response from you would glorify God and exalt Christ? Notes for Sermon on the Consequences of Poor Spiritual Leadership This morning’s message focuses on fathers, but I’d say it has application for all of you: If you’re a wife, you need to know what’s expected of your husband so you can help him in his spiritual leadership.If you’re a young man, hopefully you’ll become a father someday, so this has application for you as that day approaches.If you’re a young woman, you’ll probably get married someday, so you need to know what to look for in a husband and father of your children.And if you never marry, you will be in the Church with people who are married and you will have opportunities to encourage others in the one-another’s lis...
Oct 17 2020
1 hr
Jonah a Type of Christ – A Sign of Jesus’ Death, Burial, and Resurrection
Jonah is a type of Christ. Jesus taught that the Old Testament is about Him (Luke 24:27). Jonah serves as one of the clearest types and shadows of Christ. When Jesus was asked for a sign, He staked His death, burial, and resurrection on the prophet. Additionally, the storm the disciples experienced with Jesus in the boat parallels the storm Jonah experienced when the sailors threw him overboard. Having Jesus in the boat with the disciples didn't stop the storm they experienced any more than a relationship with Jesus stops the storms we experience. Jonah died and calmed the storm so they might live, but only Jesus calms the storm of God's wrath that's against us so we might live eternally. https://youtu.be/WS61ZFGNEfA Jonah is a type of Christ. When Jesus was asked for a sign, He staked His death, burial, and resurrection on the prophet. Table of ContentsLessons for Jonah a Type of ChristFamily Worship Guide for Jonah a Type of ChristSermon Notes for Jonah a Type of ChristLesson 1: Jesus and Jonah (part I) left Jewish territory for Gentile territory.Lesson 1: Jesus and Jonah (part II) experienced a terrible storm.Lesson 1: Jesus and Jonah (part III) slept during the storm.Lesson 1: Jesus and Jonah (part IV) were woken by sailors.Lesson 1: Jesus and Jonah (part V) calmed the storm.Lesson 1: Jesus and Jonah (part VI) were with men who came to fear god.Lesson 2: having Jesus in the boat doesn’t prevent the storms of life.Lesson 3: the storms of life don’t mean Jesus doesn’t care.Lesson 4: Jesus calms the storms in our hearts.Lesson 5: Jonah is a sign because he (part I) “died” and was “buried” for three days and three nights.Lesson 5: Jonah is a sign because he (part II) was resurrected on the third day.Lesson 6: (part I) Jonah laid down his life so others wouldn’t perish…Lesson 6: (part I) Jonah laid down his life so others wouldn’t perish (part II) but only Jesus calms the storm of god’s wrath. Lessons for Jonah a Type of Christ Lesson 1: Jesus and Jonah:(Part I) Left Jewish territory for ______________ territory (Jonah 1:1-2 cf. Mark 4:35).(Part II) ______________________ a terrible storm (Jonah 1:3-4 cf. Mark 4:37).(Part III) __________ during the storm (Jonah 1:5 cf. Mark 4:38a).(Part IV) Were __________ by sailors (Jonah 1:6 cf. Mark 4:38b).(Part V) ____________ the storm (Jonah 1:7-15 cf. Mark 4:39).(Part VI) Were ________ ______ who came to fear God (Jonah 1:16 cf. Mark 4:41).Lesson 2: Having Jesus ____ ______ ________ doesn’t prevent the storms of life (Matt 7:24-25).Lesson 3: The storms of life don’t mean Jesus ______________ ________ (Mark 4:38b).Lesson 4: Jesus calms the storms in ______ ____________ (Isa 26:3; Phil 4:7). Lesson 5: Jonah is a sign, because he:(Part I) “________” and was “____________” for three days and three nights (Matt 12:39 cf. Jonah 1:17, 2:2, 6).(Part II) Was “resurrected” on the __________ ______ (Jonah 2:10). Lesson 6: (Part I) Jonah laid down his life so others wouldn’t ____________, (Part II) but only Jesus calms the storm of __________ __________ (Jonah 1:12 cf. Jonah 1:6, 14; John 3:16; Matt 12:41; Luke 11:32; Rom 5:1, 9).  Family Worship Guide for Jonah a Type of Christ Day 1: Read Jonah 1 and discuss: In what parts of this chapter is Jesus foreshadowed? How about in the rest of the Old Testament? In other words, what other types and shadows of Christ come to mind, such as Abraham sacrificing Isaac, the manna, bronze serpent, etc.? How is Jesus revealed through these shadows?Day 2: Read James 1:2, Acts 14:22, 1 Thessalonians 3:3, 1 Peter 4:12, and John 16:33 and discuss: What do we tend to think we will avoid if we’re obedient? What are the dangers of this false belief? Why are so many Christians surprised by trials? Describe your most recent trial (or current one) and your initial reaction. Was it a surprise? How did/have you respond/ed?Day 3: Read Romans 12:15, 1 Corinthians 12:26, Proverbs 25:20, and Job 2:13: What is Proverbs 25:20 instructing us to do (and not...
Oct 18 2020
1 hr
Unity and Holiness – The Importance for the Church
Unity and holiness is important to the church for the sanctification of believers and outreach and evangelism to unbelievers. God’s pattern throughout man’s history is to have an inside and outside, including during the Church Age. Holiness creates the boundary so the church doesn’t look like the world. In the Old Testament the Mosaic Law contained commands that allowed Israel to be holy and set apart from the surrounding nations. In the New Testament, believers are still called to be holy, but holiness in the church means avoiding worldliness, or separation from the world. Unity is important because unbelievers observe both our love for each other and our conflict. https://youtu.be/jsodwaBJ0AM Unity and holiness in the church is important for believers' sanctification and evangelism. Holiness means avoiding worldliness. Table of ContentsLessons for Unity and HolinessFamily Worship Guide for Unity and HolinessSermon notes for Unity and HolinessLesson 1: God’s pattern is to have an “inside” and “outside.”Lesson 2: Holiness creates the boundary between the inside and outside.Lesson 3: Holiness in the church means avoiding worldliness.Lesson 4: Those outside observe our (part 1) unity.Lesson 4: Those outside observe our (part 2) conflict. Lessons for Unity and Holiness Lesson 1: God’s pattern is to have an “____________” and “______________” (Matt 21:31; Mark 4:11; Luke 16:16; Col 4:5; 1 Thes 4:12; 1 Tim 3:7; 1 Cor 5:12-13; Rev 22:14-15). Lesson 2: ________________ creates the boundary between the inside and outside (1 Pet 1:15; Heb 12:14). Lesson 3: Holiness in the church means avoiding ______________________ (Rom 12:2; 1 John 2:15-16; Jam 4:4). Lesson 4: Those outside observe our:(Part I) __________ (John 17:20-23; Gal 6:10). • (Part II) ________________ (1 Cor 6:6-7; Pro 6:16-19; Rom 16:17; Titus 3:10). Family Worship Guide for Unity and Holiness Day 1: Read Matt 21:31, 25:10; Mark 4:11; Luke 16:16; Col 4:5; 1 Thes 4:12; 1 Tim 3:7; 2 Tim 2:21; Jam 4:8; 1 John 1:9 and discuss: When do we see an “inside” and “outside” in the Old Testament? What about in the New Testament? Why is it God’s pattern to have an “inside” and “outside”? Can you think of times in Scripture people moved from the “outside” to the “inside”? What about the other way around? Day 2: Read 1 John 2:15-17, 1 Cor 5:12-13 cf. Lev 24:14; Deut 17:7, 19:19, 22:21, 24, 24:7 and discuss: Why is holiness so important to the church too? How does holiness create a boundary between the “inside” and “outside,” or between the church and the world? What does this holiness look like? Day 3: Read John 17:20-23, 13:35, Gal 6:10 and discuss: Why is unity so important, or in other words: what does unity communicate to the onlooking world? Why do you think it communicates this? What can you do to help strengthen the unity at CBC? Why are seasons of intense suffering in the body such great witnessing/outreach opportunities? Day 4: Read 1 Cor 6:6-7, Pro 6:16-19, Rom 16:17, Titus 3:10 and discuss: What are the greatest threats to our unity? To our witness? Why did Paul tell the Corinthians to “suffer loss”? What are the six things God hates? Why such strong verses reserved for divisive people, or in other words, why are divisive people such threats to the church? What exactly do they threaten? How should the church handle them? Sermon notes for Unity and Holiness I’d like to begin w/ our first lesson… Lesson 1: God’s pattern is to have an “inside” and “outside.” If you take an elevated view of Scripture, you’ll see this. I’d say the devil – and the demons w/ him – were the first ones to learn God establishes an inside and outside. Lucifer was inside heaven, but when he sinned he was cast outside…and the third of angels who joined him were as well. Who are the next people to learn there’s an inside and outside? I’ll give you a hint: they’re the first people! Adam and Eve were inside Eden, but they sinned and were put outside.
Oct 22 2020
50 mins
Train Up Your Children the Way They Should Go but Go That Way Yourself
Proverbs 22:6 says, "Train up your children in the way they should go," but as parents we must go that way ourselves to avoid being hypocrites. We desire the best for our children. We want them to embrace the Gospel and follow the Lord at the earliest possible time in their lives. Our children face so many threats. Could one of those threats be from their own parents? As Christian parents what can we do to avoid hypocrisy in our parenting and ensure our children see the Gospel in us, through our lives, and through our parenting? https://youtu.be/DIXjDe54d0k Proverbs 22:6 says, "Train up your children in the way they should go," but parents must go that way themselves to avoid being hypocrites. Table of ContentsLessons for Train Up Your Children in the Way They Should GoFamily Worship Guide for Train Up Your Children in the Way They Should GoSermon notes for Train Up Your Children in the Way They Should GoLesson 1: resist temptation so you don’t see your sins in your children.Lesson 2: don’t let past sins prevent you from disciplining your children.Avoid hypocrisy in parenting by (lesson 3) modeling what you want from your children.Avoid hypocrisy in parenting by (lesson 4) telling your children you’re a sinner. Lessons for Train Up Your Children in the Way They Should Go Lesson 1: ____________ ____________________ so you don’t see your sins in your children (2 Sam 13:21, 38-39, 14:33, 18:5; 1 Kin 1:6). 16:24 Lesson 2: Don’t let ________ ________ prevent you from disciplining your children (Pro 13:24, 19:18). Avoid hypocrisy in parenting by: 20:32 Lesson 3: ________________ ________ you want from your children (Rom 2:1, 20-24; Matt 7:1-5). 38:54 Lesson 4: Telling your children ____________ __ ____________. Family Worship Guide for Train Up Your Children in the Way They Should Go Day 1—Read 2 Sam 13:21, 38-39, 14:33, 18:5, 1 Kin 1:6 and discuss: What sins did David see in the lives of his sons? In what ways did David’s sons’ sins reveal his sins? What are the dangers associated with viewing our children too sentimentally? Day 2—Read Pro 1:8-9, 3:12, 13:24, 19:18, 22:6 and discuss: Why didn’t David discipline his sons? Why would past sins prevent parents from disciplining their children? What can parents tell themselves when past sins prevent them from disciplining their children? When parents have sin-filled pasts what can they their children to avoid hypocrisy? Day 3—Read Rom 2:1, 20-24, Matt 7:1-5 and discuss: Do you have expectations for your children that you don’t have for yourself? What would your children say in answer to the previous question? Do your children see behaviors from you that you don’t want to see from them? Are you presenting a high view of God in your home, not just from what you profess, but the way you live? Day 4—Read Rom 3:9-23 and discuss: Why should parents share with their children that they’re sinners too? What are the dangers for parents if they don’t share with their children that they’re sinners too? Why is it important for parents to avoid making excuses to their children? What happens if children grow up with parents who regularly shift blame? In what ways can children see Christ through humble, loving parents? Sermon notes for Train Up Your Children in the Way They Should Go The NT is clear that one of the main purposes of the OT is to provide us w/ examples we can learn from: Romans 15:4 Whatever things were written before [referring to the Old Testament] were written for OUR LEARNING.1 Corinthians 10:6 These things (referring to the OT) became OUR EXAMPLES…1 Corinthians 10:11 These things happened to them (the Israelites) AS EXAMPLES, and were written for OUR ADMONITION (or instruction). So I like to use the OT to provide examples when I’m teaching. We’re going to discuss avoiding hypocrisy in parenting, and the OT can lay a foundation for us by looking at David and his relationships w/ his sons. If you have a Bible, please turn to 2 Samuel 13…
Oct 23 2020
57 mins
Strong Christian Men Protect Their Home from Spiritual Enemies that Seek to Destroy Their Wife and Children
Strong Christian men spiritually protect their home from the enemies that seek to destroy their wife and children, such as the world, the devil, and the flesh. In Matthew 12:29 Jesus said, "How can one enter a strong man's house and plunder his goods, unless he first binds the strong man? And then he will plunder his house." The entire house is protected by the strong man. The house rises or falls based on him. Strong men protect their families by deciding what enter, and avoiding being bound by sin. Spiritually strong men protect their houses (families) from the devil plundering their goods (wife and children) by putting Jesus Christ first, because He has the victory over the devil. https://youtu.be/xS-XKOLYGuM Strong Christian men protect their home from enemies that seek to destroy their wife and children (the world, the devil, and the flesh). Table of ContentsLessons for Strong Christian Men Protect Their Home from Spiritual EnemiesFamily Worship Guide for Strong Christian Men Protect Their Home from Spiritual EnemiesMessage Notes for for Strong Christian Men Protect Their Home from Spiritual EnemiesLesson 1: strong men protect their houses spiritually.Lesson 2: strong men decide what enters their homes.Lesson 3: strong men prevent their families from being plundered.Lesson 4: strong men are not bound.Lesson 5: strong men often have encouraging wives.Lesson 6: strong men put christ first. Lessons for Strong Christian Men Protect Their Home from Spiritual Enemies Lesson 1: Strong men protect their ____________ _____________________ (Matt 12:29).Lesson 2: Strong men decide ________ ____________ their homes.Lesson 3: Strong men prevent their families from __________ __________________ (John 10:10; 1 Peter 5:8).Lesson 4: Strong men are ______ __________ (Matthew 12:22; Ephesians 6:4; 1 Corinthians 13:11; 2 Corinthians 10:4; Ephesians 6:12).Lesson 5: Strong men often have ______________________ __________ (Ephesians 5:33; 1 Peter 3:1).Lesson 6: Strong men put ____________ __________ (Colossians 2:15; Hebrews 2:14; 1 John 3:8). Family Worship Guide for Strong Christian Men Protect Their Home from Spiritual Enemies Day 1: Men, read Eph. 5:25 & 1 Pet. 3:7. If married, consider which ways you are uniting your household; consider which ways you are dividing your household. Discuss with your wife. Women, read Eph. 5:22, 33b, & 1 Pet. 3:1 If married, consider which ways you are uniting your household; consider which ways you are dividing your household. Discuss with your husband. Parents & children read together Eph. 6:1, 4 and ask: In what ways (regarding our parenting of you) are we uniting our household? In what ways are we dividing our household?Singles: Consider how you could learn from married couples the ways they are intentionally uniting their households. Married Couples: Consider periodically inviting singles into your home for the purpose of discussing these issues with them and being an example for them. Day 2: Read Ephesians 4:25-32 Discuss the commands in this passage with your family. How can these commands change the way you communicate with each other? In v.31, what things must be ‘put-off’? In v.32, what things must be ‘put-on’? Day 3: Read Matthew 8:14-17 and Genesis 1. How is Jesus’s power to cast out demons like God’s power to create all things? What do they use in order to cast out demons and to create all things? What does this teach about God’s power? How should this knowledge of God shape our prayers? Suggestions for prayer: Your elders: those who lead, feed, and care for the flock, and their families (Col 4:3; 2 Thes 3:1).Church members in need (1 Tim 2:1; Eph 6:18; Col 1:9).“Kings” and those in authority: President Trump, Vice President Pence, Governor Inslee (1 Tim 2:2).The spread of the Gospel: Missionaries and unreached people groups (Matt 9:37-38). Message Notes for for Strong Christian Men Protect Their Home from Spiritual Enemies
Oct 23 2020
47 mins
Behold, Children Are a Gift of the LORD; the Fruit of the Womb a Reward (Psalm 127:3)
"Behold, children are a gift of the Lord, the fruit of the womb is a reward," writes Solomon in Psalm 127:3. My desire with this sermon is for people to view children as they're described in the Bible, which is to say view children as God views them. https://youtu.be/WhenX1JvKGA "Behold, children are a gift of the Lord, the fruit of the womb is a reward," (Psalm 127:3). Children and barrenness are sensitive issues. Table of ContentsLessons for Children Are a Gift of the LORD; the Fruit of the Womb a Reward Family Worship Guide for Children Are a Gift of the LORD; the Fruit of the Womb a Reward Sermon Notes for Lessons for Children Are a Gift of the LORD; the Fruit of the Womb a RewardLesson 1: God commands people to, “Be fruitful and multiply.”Lesson 2: children are (part 1) a gift, reward, and blessing.Lesson 2: children are (part 2) great causes of maturity.Lesson 3: barrenness (part 1) is a theme in Scripture.Lesson 3: barrenness (part 2) shouldn’t be chosen.Lesson 4: apply what God's Word says about children. Lessons for Children Are a Gift of the LORD; the Fruit of the Womb a Reward Lesson 1: God ________________ ____________ to, “be fruitful and multiply” (Gen 1:28, 2:18; Pro 14:28).Lesson 2: Children are:(Part I) A ________, ____________, and ________________ (Psa 127:3-5, 128:1-4; Deut 7:13, 28:4).(Part II) __________ ____________ of maturity (Eph 6:4; 1 Tim 2:15). Lesson 3: Barrenness: • (Part I) Is __ __________ ____ Scripture (Gen 11:30, 25:21, 29:31; Judg 13:2; 1 Sam 1:5; Luke 1:7 • (Part II) Shouldn’t ____ ____________. Lesson 4: __________ ________ God’s Word says about children (Pro 14:4). Family Worship Guide for Children Are a Gift of the LORD; the Fruit of the Womb a Reward Memory Verses: Psalm 127:3 1. Day 1—Read Genesis 1:28 and discuss: Why did God give this command? What benefits are there associated with this command being obeyed/fulfilled? What problems are associated with it being disobeyed? Are we seeing some of those problems today?Day 2—Read Psalms 127 and 128 and discuss: How are children described? How should parents view their children? How should Christians respond when God provides a couple with a child?Day 3—Read Ephesians 6:4 and 1 Timothy 2:15 and discuss: How do children help parents mature spiritually? What does it mean that women “will be saved in childbearing”?Day 4—Read some of the accounts of barren women (Gen 11:30, 25:21, 29:31; Judg 13:2; 1 Sam 1:15, Luke 1:7) and discuss: What are some of the similarities in these accounts? What can we learn from them? How should Christians view barrenness? Why shouldn’t barrenness be chosen?Day 5—Read Pro 14:4 and discuss: What application does this verse have to families? Since families can’t do everything they might want, discuss those activities that are most important and least important to your family. Sermon Notes for Lessons for Children Are a Gift of the LORD; the Fruit of the Womb a Reward I probably don’t have to tell you children are a very sensitive issue in the church for a number of reasons: First, you have some people who haven’t been able to have any children, and they feel judged or misunderstood by others.Second, some people have a lot of children and they feel…judged or misunderstood by others.Finally, you have some people who only have a few children and they feel…judged or misunderstood by others. As we begin let me tell you my desires for this message… First, I want to share what God’s Word says about children… If you have no children, 15 children, or any number in between, by the end of this message I hope you’ll see children as they’re described in God’s Word. And this applies to all of us: Obviously, it applies to people who have childrenIt also applies to people who are younger and will children in the futureIt applies to people who are older who might not be able to have children anymore, but are in the position to teach younger people about children.
Oct 27 2020
57 mins
The Lord Is Full of Compassion and Is Merciful to Us (James 5:11)
James 5:11 says, “We count those blessed who endured. You have heard of the endurance of Job and have seen the outcome of the Lord’s dealings, that the Lord is full of compassion and is merciful.” If someone said, “Show me an example in Scripture of God being compassionate and merciful” you wouldn’t take them to Job, but James 5:11 says that even with Job, God was still "very compassionate and merciful." The Coronavirus has caused some people to doubt God’s compassion and mercy. The sermon examines God’s compassion and mercy to Job when he suffered and to us when we suffer in light of the recent events. https://youtu.be/ibOEBUzNytY The Lord Is full of compassion and is merciful (James 5:11) even in the worst trials. We know this because of God's dealing with Job. Table of ContentsLessons for The Lord Is Full of Compassion and Is Merciful to UsFamily Worship Guide for The Lord Is Full of Compassion and Is Merciful to UsSermon Notes for The Lord Is Full of Compassion and Is Merciful to UsLesson 1: perseverance doesn’t mean perfection.Lesson 2: even in the worst trials “the lord is [still] very compassionate and merciful”Lesson 3: God was compassionate and merciful in that he (part 1) restricted what Satan could do.Lesson 3: God was compassionate and merciful in that he (part 2) didn’t punish Job.Lesson 3: God was compassionate and merciful in that he (part 3) blessed Job when the trials were over. Lessons for The Lord Is Full of Compassion and Is Merciful to Us Lesson 1: Perseverance doesn’t ________ ____________________ (James 5:11; Job 9:23, 21:4, 9, 17, 24:12, 31:35-32:1 cf. Luke 18:9). Lesson 2: Even in the __________ ____________ “the Lord is still very compassionate and merciful” (James 5:11).Lesson 3: God was compassionate and merciful in that He:(Part I) _____________________ ________ Satan could do (Job 1:9, 12, 2:6).(Part II) Didn’t ____________ ______.(Part III) ______________ ______ when the trials were over (Job 42:10-12; James 1:12). Family Worship Guide for The Lord Is Full of Compassion and Is Merciful to Us Day 1—Read James 1:2, 5:11, Job 13:15 and discuss: How can trials negatively affect our attitude toward God? What is God’s design for testing in our lives? Does perseverance mean that we need to be perfect in trials? To what degree did Job trust God? How much of our lives should we be trusting God with? Day 2—Job 31:35-38, Job 40:3-4, and discuss: Why is it easy to justify ourselves to others and to God when we are going through trials? What standard do we typically look to for fairness when we are being severely tested, God’s or our own? How was Job’s perseverance manifested when he did not act perfect? How should this be an encouragement to us when we are tried? Day 3—Job 1:9-12, Job 42:12, Jam 1:12, and discuss: How was God’s compassion shown in Job’s trials? In what ways can we have hope in God’s compassion toward us in our trials? In what ways was Job blessed more by God in the latter days of his life? What does God promise us for enduring trials? Sermon Notes for The Lord Is Full of Compassion and Is Merciful to Us This sermon was on my heart with the trial we’re experiencing with the Coronavirus. Let me begin with an important point… Trials and temptations are NOT the same: Trials are tests from God. He has a special purpose in them.Temptations on the other hand do not come from God: James 1:13 Let no one say when he is tempted, “I am tempted by God”; for God cannot be tempted by evil, nor does He Himself tempt anyone.  Think of it like this: God uses trials to test us to bring out the best in us.The devil uses temptations to try to bring out the worst in us. But even though trials and temptations aren’t the same, there is a common temptation we face in EVERY trial and it’s the temptation to get angry with God. This is exactly what Satan said Job would do if God allowed trials in his life. Look at Job 1:11…
Nov 6 2020
1 hr
We Are the Clay and You Our Potter (Jeremiah 18:1-12) – Hard or Soft in the Master’s Hands
Isaiah 64:8 says, "You are our Father; we are the clay, and You our potter; and all we are the work of Your hand." We can say this to God since He's sovereign, including over the trials we experience. To reject trials is to reject God's will for our lives. The Potter and the Clay in Jeremiah 18:1-12 is an object lesson God used to teach this truth to His people. As Jeremiah watched the potter work, he learned how we should respond to God’s work in our lives. We are being shaped! The Potter is shaping our lives, nation, and – really – the whole world through the Coronavirus. This sermon reveals how we should – and shouldn’t – respond. https://youtu.be/3qVB805qBo0 Isaiah 64:8 says, "You are our Father; we are the clay, and You our potter." Jeremiah 18:1-12 contains the object lesson. This is similar to the 5th message I deliver at Enduring Trials God’s Way Conferences. Download and print the print the handout that’s given to attendees to have a conference in the privacy of your own home.Visit my speaking page for conference and speaking information, including testimonies, endorsements, and contact info.Receive a FREE copy of my book, Seven Biblical Insights for Healthy, Joyful, Christ-Centered Marriages.View all my books on my Amazon author page. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for We Are the Clay and You Our PotterFamily Worship Guide for We Are the Clay and You Our PotterSermon Notes for We Are the Clay and You Our PotterLesson 1: the potter is sovereign over (part 1) nations.Lesson 1: the potter is sovereign over (part 2) individuals.Lesson 2: the Jews’ hardness made them discarded vessels.Lesson 3: we must be soft in the potter’s hands. Sermon Lessons for We Are the Clay and You Our Potter Lesson 1: The potter is sovereign over:(Part I) ______________ (Jer 18:1-10; Dan 2:21, 4:17; Pro 21:1; Acts 17:26; Jon 3:10).(Part II) ______________________ (Jer 18:11-12; Isa 64:8; Eph 2:10; 2 Cor 4:7; Gen 2:7; Job 4:19, 10:9; Phil 1:6)Lesson 2: The __________ ________________ made them discarded vessels (Jer 17:23, 19:1-10).Lesson 3: We must ____ ________ in the Potter’s hands (1 Cor 10:11; Isa 45:9; Rom 9:17-24; 2 Tim 2:20-21). Family Worship Guide for We Are the Clay and You Our Potter Day 1: Jeremiah 18:5-11, Daniel 2:21, 4:17, Proverbs 21:1, Acts, and discuss: What visual does Scripture give us to show God’s sovereignty over nations? Do kings attain their power or is it bestowed? Why is it important to remember how rulers get their power? How is your confidence affected by knowing Who is ultimately in control? How should this effect our willingness to be under His control? Day 2: Isa 64:8, Eph 2:10, Jer 1:5, 2 Cor 4:7, and discuss: What visual does Scripture use to show how fragile we are? Does the reality of our fragility take away from our value and purpose to God? Who should our lives be pointing the attention of others to? How do we best show God’s glory, by our control or by being yielded to His control? Day 3: Jer 18:8-12, Isa 45:9, 2 Tim 2:20-21, and discuss: If we, like the clay, cannot change ourselves, what can we do in order for God to change us? Why is it difficult to be shaped against our natural form? What difficult things has God used to shape you? What hope does Paul give regarding repentance playing into our purpose? Sermon Notes for We Are the Clay and You Our Potter We are being shaped! The Potter is shaping our lives, nation, and – really – the whole world. We’re going to consider how we should – and shouldn’t – respond. Since we’re jumping into this book, I’ll give you a little context: Jeremiah was the last prophet to the Jews prior to their exile in Babylon.He delivered a series of messages to them, but unfortunately they wouldn’t listen.This is part of his 7th message, which goes through chapter 20. We’re going to be in chapter 18, but I want you to see one verse in chapter 17. Jeremiah’s been preaching to the Jews for 20 years.
Nov 9 2020
56 mins
Sorrow of the World Produces Death, but Godly Sorrow Repentance (2 Corinthians 7:10)
Second Corinthians 7:10 says, "Godly sorrow produces repentance leading to salvation, not to be regretted; but the sorrow of the world produces death." At different times people defend Judas, minimize his actions, and even claim he was a believer. It always relates to him bringing back the money saying he sinned, and showing sorrow over what he did. The problem is that Scripture discusses two types of sorrow: godly sorrow and worldly sorrow. Godly sorrow produces repentance leading to salvation, while worldly sorrow produces death. Judas committed suicide because he experienced so much sorrow. He shows us how not to deal with sorrow, and what we should do with sorrow instead. Judas teaches an important lesson. Feeling bad about what we’ve done, experiencing sorrow - even feeling bad enough to commit suicide - doesn’t mean repentance has taken place. https://youtu.be/lgvONG7ZNUY "Godly sorrow produces repentance leading to salvation, but sorrow of the world produces death" (2 Corinthians 7:10). Feeling bad isn't repentance. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for Sorrow of the World Produces Death, but Godly Sorrow RepentanceFamily Worship Guide for Sorrow of the World Produces Death, but Godly Sorrow RepentanceSermon Notes for Sorrow of the World Produces Death, but Godly Sorrow RepentanceLesson 1: we underestimate the consequences of our sin.Lesson 2: feeling bad isn't repentance.Lesson 3: godly sorrow leads to Christ. Sermon Lessons for Sorrow of the World Produces Death, but Godly Sorrow Repentance Lesson 1: ____ __________________________ the consequences of sin (Matt 27:3-4; Jer 2:19). Lesson 2: ______________ ______ isn’t repentance (2 Cor 7:10). Lesson 3: Godly sorrow __________ to ____________ (Luke 13:1-3). Family Worship Guide for Sorrow of the World Produces Death, but Godly Sorrow Repentance Day 1: Matt 27:3-5, Jer 2:19, Pro 5:22 and discuss: What was the outcome of Judas’ betrayal that caused him remorse? What are some wrong choices you made still hoping for a favorable outcome? Can we ever go back and undo what was done? What does Jeremiah teach regarding the consequences of our sins? How does Proverbs describe the effects of the consequences of sin? Day 2: Read 2 Cor 7:10, Matt 27:5, Psa 51:4, and discuss: What is the difference between worldly sorrow and Godly sorrow? Who is the offender most concerned about when he experiences Godly sorrow? Who is the offender most concerned about when he experiences worldly sorrow? What kind of sorrow did Judas display? Why is it important to discern who we are most concerned about being impacted by our sin? How will this help determine what kind of sorrow we are experiencing? Day 3: Luke 13:1-5, Isa 59:2, Isa 55:7, and discuss: Referencing Luke 13:1-3, how can the events of the pandemic serve as a reminder about our need to repent of sin? What separates us from God? What promise is given to the one who forsakes his sin and turns to God? How should this motivate us to be quick to repent? Sermon Notes for Sorrow of the World Produces Death, but Godly Sorrow Repentance Please stand and open your Bibles to Matthew 27 to read verses 1-10… Matthew 27:1 When morning came, all the chief priests and elders of the people plotted against Jesus to put Him to death. 2 And when they had bound Him, they led Him away and delivered Him to [a]Pontius Pilate the governor. Judas Hangs Himself 3 Then Judas, His betrayer, seeing that He had been condemned, was remorseful and brought back the thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and elders, 4 saying, “I have sinned by betraying innocent blood.” And they said, “What is that to us? You see to it!” 5 Then he threw down the pieces of silver in the temple and departed, and went and hanged himself. 6 But the chief priests took the silver pieces and said, “It is not lawful to put them into the treasury, because they are the price of blood.” 7 And they consulted together and bought with them the potter’s field,
Nov 17 2020
1 hr
Wives in the Same Way Submit Yourselves to Your Husbands As Commanded (1 Peter 3:1, Ephesians 5:22)
"Wives, in the same way submit yourselves to your husbands so that, if any of them do not believe the word, they may be won over without words by the behavior of their wives" is commanded in 1 Peter 3:1. The same command is found in Ephesians 5:22 and 24: "Wives, submit yourselves to your own husbands as you do to the Lord...Now as the church submits to Christ, so also wives should submit to their husbands in everything." Colossians 3:18 also commands, "Wives, submit yourselves to your husbands, as is fitting in the Lord." "Submission" is frowned on in the world's eyes, but it's a clear command to wives in Scripture. What does it look (and not look) like for wives to submit to their husbands as the church does to Christ? Also, how can husbands make it easier to submit to them? https://youtu.be/bK3h53KP_FI "Wives, in the same way submit yourselves to your husbands" is commanded in Colossians 3:18, Ephesians 5:22, 1 Peter 3:1, and Titus 2:4. This is the third message I deliver at Marriage God’s Way Conferences.Receive a FREE copy of my book, Seven Biblical Insights for Healthy, Joyful, Christ-Centered Marriages.View all my books on my Amazon author page.Visit my speaking page for conference and speaking information, including testimonies, endorsements, and contact info.Have a Marriage God’s Way Conference in the privacy of your own home. Download and print the handout that’s given to attendees. Table of ContentsLessons for Wives in the Same Way Submit Yourselves to Your Husbands Discussion Questions for Wives in the Same Way Submit Yourselves to Your HusbandsMessage Notes for Wives in the Same Way Submit Yourselves to Your HusbandsLesson 1: submission is (part 1) necessary.Lesson 1: submission is (part 2) not a matter of superiority.Lesson 1: submission is (part 3) for when a wife disagrees.Lesson 2: submission means a wife (part 1) puts her husband in a position to lead.Lesson 2: submission means a wife (part 2) trusts god.Lesson 2: submission means a wife (part 3) keeps her strength under control.Lesson 3: a husband should make his wife’s submission easier. Lessons for Wives in the Same Way Submit Yourselves to Your Husbands Lesson 1: Submission is:(Part I) __________________ (Eph 5:22, 24; Col 3:18; 1 Pet 3:1; Titus 2:5).(Part II) Not a matter of ______________________ (John 6:38; Matt 26:39).(Part III) For when a wife __________________.Lesson 2: Submission means a wife:(Part I) Puts her husband in a ________________ to ________.(Part II) ____________ God (1 Pet 3:5-6).(Part III) Keeps her strength __________ ______________. Lesson 3: A husband should make his wife’s ___________________ ___________ (Eph 5:27; 1 Pet 3:7; Gal 6:7). Discussion Questions for Wives in the Same Way Submit Yourselves to Your Husbands Husband asks wife:How do I make it hard for you to submit to me?How do I make it easier for you to submit to me?Do you feel like I listen to your thoughts when it comes to making decisions?Do you feel like I admit when I’m wrong, or do I make excuses and shift blame? Wife asks husband:Do you feel like I submit “kicking and screaming”?Do you feel like I put you in a position to lead?Do you feel like I take control of situations or decisions that should be left to you?Do you feel like I say, “I told you so!”? Message Notes for Wives in the Same Way Submit Yourselves to Your Husbands “Is Submission a Bad Word?” is the title of my message. First thing I’d like you to do is raise your hand if you think submission is a bad word. I see lots: Lots of women’s hands raised…No men’s hands raised… Interesting ?. Second, I’d like to continue w/ a lesson… Lesson 1: submission is (part 1) necessary. If you think about the structure of teams, businesses, schools – or really – any organization, there are individuals in leadership: In businesses there are CEOs.In sports there are coaches.In organizations there are presidents.In schools there are principals.
Nov 20 2020
36 mins
Jesus Took Our Place on the Cross – Substitutionary Atonement with Barabbas (Matthew 27:15-26)
Jesus took our place on the cross and His substitutionary atonement is demonstrated beautifully when He died in the place of Barabbas, a notorious sinner. Matthew 27:26, says, "Then Pilate released Barabbas to them; and when he had scourged Jesus, he delivered Him to be crucified." I’d like you to put yourself in Barabbas’s place. When the guards came to get him, what do you think he thought…and didn’t think? He thought, “This is the time for me to be punished.” He didn’t, “This is the time for me to be released.” What do you think the guards said to him? Maybe something like, “Barabbas, you’re a guilty, evil man. You deserve to be punished, but you’re going to be released b/c Jesus of Nazareth is going to die in your place and receive the punishment you deserve.” The cross Jesus died on was probably the cross intended for Barabbas. https://youtu.be/yyC2Jw1UCqk Jesus took our place on the cross and His substitutionary atonement is demonstrated beautifully when He died in the place of Barabbas. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for Jesus Took Our Place on the Cross Family Worship Guide for Jesus Took Our Place on the Cross Sermon Notes for Jesus Took Our Place on the CrossLesson 1: Zechariah prophesied the Jews would reject Jesus and choose Barabbas.Lesson 2: the Jews hated Jesus more than they hated (part 1) BarabbasLesson 2: the Jews hated Jesus more than they hated (part 2) crucifixion.Lesson 2: the Jews hated Jesus more than they hated (part 3) Caesar.Lesson 3: the Jews chose the wrong, “Jesus son of the father.”Lesson 4: we are Barabbas. Sermon Lessons for Jesus Took Our Place on the Cross Lesson 1: ________________ ____________________ the Jews would reject Jesus and choose Barabbas (Zech 11:12¬15; Mark 15:7). Lesson 2: The Jews hated Jesus more than they hated:(Part I) ________________ (Matt 27:21).(Part II) ______________________ (Matt 27:22–23; Deut 21:23 cf. Gal 3:13).(Part III) _____________ (John 19:12–15). Lesson 3: The Jews __________ the __________, "Jesus Son of the Father" (John 8:42–44; Matt 27:26). Lesson 4: ____ ______ Barabbas (Matt 27:22). Family Worship Guide for Jesus Took Our Place on the Cross Day 1: Zec 11:15-16, Matt 27:18-23, Mark 15:7, and discuss: How was Barabbas like the foolish shepherd mentioned in Zechariah? Why did Pilate choose Barabbas to exchange for Jesus? How was he surprised by the people's choice? How was their choice a reflection of the depravity of their heart's desire? Day 2: John 19:12-15, Matt 27:24 and discuss: Was the Jew's condemnation of Jesus a show of their loyalty to Caesar? Why or why not? How was their choice for Caesar to rule over them a utter rejection of Christ? How else has man expressed their hatred of Jesus by their choices? How did Pilate try to remove himself from being responsible for what happened to Jesus? What ways do people try to absolve themselves of their responsibility regarding what to do with Jesus? Day 3: Matt 27:16, John 8:42-44, John 18:38, John 14:6, Matt 27:22, and discuss: What ways was Barabbas a counterfeit of Jesus? How does Barabbas represent us in our fallen state? How is Jesus being exchanged for Barabbas a picture of salvation? Sermon Notes for Jesus Took Our Place on the Cross The title of this morning’s sermon is, “He Took Our Place.” We’re going to pick up close to where we left off last week, which is to say, soon after Judas returned the money and hung himself. If you were able to tune in to Wednesday night’s study, two weeks ago, we began w/ some verses in Zechariah 11, and we are going to continue where they left off too. Here’s how I want to invite you to view Zechariah 11… It’s like a summary of the last hours of Jesus’ life. Zechariah acts out a drama with him playing the part of two different shepherds: One represents the True Shepherd: Jesus ChristThe other represents the Foolish Shepherd: Barabbas The people reject the True Shepherd and embrace the Foolish Shepherd.
Nov 23 2020
56 mins
Submit Yourselves to Every Ordinance of Man for the Lord’s Sake (1 Peter 2:13)-Appealing Versus Rebelling
First Peter 2:13-14 commands, "Therefore submit yourselves to every ordinance of man for the Lord’s sake, whether to the king as supreme, or to governors, as to those who are sent by him for the punishment of evildoers and for the praise of those who do good." Pastor Scott explained why the elders feel led to submit to government and appeal to officials during the Coronavirus lockdown (Covid-19), versus rebel against the command for churches to remain closed. He also discusses at what point the elders would disobey authority. https://youtu.be/Z7Rmo3XMSAY "Submit yourselves to every ordinance of man for the Lord’s sake," (1 Peter 2:13). Why WCC elders feel led to submit to government & appeal. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for Submit Yourselves to Every Ordinance of Man for the Lord’s Sake Family Worship Guide for Submit Yourselves to Every Ordinance of Man for the Lord’s Sake Sermon Notes for Submit Yourselves to Every Ordinance of Man for the Lord’s SakeLesson 1: we don’t submit (part 1) to sin.Lesson 2: build theology with imperatives supported by narratives.Lesson 1: we don’t submit (part 2) kicking and screaming.Lesson 3: we do submit to ungodly people. Sermon Lessons for Submit Yourselves to Every Ordinance of Man for the Lord’s Sake Lesson 1: We don’t submit:(Part I) ____ ______ (Dan 6:6-10; Jer 27:8-12; Acts 5:29-31, 40-42; 1 Pet 2:13-17).(Part II) ______________ and __________________ (1 Pet 2:21-23). Lesson 2: Build theology with ______________________ supported by ____________________. Lesson 3: We do submit to ______________ ____________ (1 Pet 2:18, 3:1; Jer 27:8-12). Family Worship Guide for Submit Yourselves to Every Ordinance of Man for the Lord’s Sake Day 1: Read Dan 6:6-10; Jer 27:8-12; Acts 5:29-31, 40-42; 1 Pet 2:13-17, and discuss: Do you think submission is harder for Americans? Why or why not? Why does God call Christians to submit to authority? Can you think of other individuals in Scripture who didn’t submit to sin when ordered by the authority over them? Day 2: Read Dan 6:6-10; Jer 27:8-12; Acts 5:29-31, 40-42; 1 Pet 2:13-17 and discuss: What does it mean to build theology with imperatives and support it with narratives? How does this lesson apply to the current situation? Can you think of some imperatives in the epistles that have supporting narratives in the Old Testament, Gospels, or Acts? What’s wrong with building theology with narratives versus imperatives? Day 3: Read 1 Pet 2:18, 3:1; Jer 27:8-12, and discuss: Describe Jesus’ submission since Peter says it serves as an example for us. What does it look like submitting kicking and screaming? What does it look like to submit without kicking and screaming? Why does God command us to submit to ungodly people? Why is it important to remember that we’re submitting “for the Lord’s sake”? Sermon Notes for Submit Yourselves to Every Ordinance of Man for the Lord’s Sake I’ve had many interactions w/ people in the church over the last few weeks, most of them wonderful, and I want to share about three of them… A few weeks ago a couple in the church reached out to me w/ some questions. They wanted to have a Zoom call and understand what the leadership was thinking and where we’re coming from: I appreciated their attitudesThey wanted to understand, and they asked questions and listened The second interaction took place this past week. A man reached out to me, disagreeing w/ something I said on Wednesday night. I appreciated this communication as well: He expressed his respect and appreciation for the leadershipAnd he took the time to put his thoughts in a document for the leadership to read. I’m also thankful for this communication, b/c it revealed something I wanted to clarify… On Wednesday night I shared the three principles that have been governing us from the beginning. I said… “Principle 1: Submission to Government” He said, “How could you say your first principle is submission to government,
Nov 26 2020
1 hr
The Importance of Family Worship – Deuteronomy 6:7 You Shall Teach Them Diligently to Your Children
The importance of family worship is in the Old and New Testaments. Since families are at home together because of the Coronavirus, Pastor Scott recorded his family worship, modeling for other families what they can easily do too. The video includes them coming together at the table, singing worship songs, reading the Bible together, and praying for some requests. You can jump to 5:50 if you want to see when we actually begin, but he left the first few minutes because he wanted it to be real. You can see how messy and loud the LaPierre family home is, even minutes before (and then during) family worship. https://youtu.be/ol--f8WvfF8 The importance of family worship is in the Old and New Testaments. Pastor Scott recorded his family worship, modeling for other families. I discuss the importance of family worship at Marriage God’s Way Conferences. Have a Marriage God’s Way Conference in the privacy of your own home. Download and print the handout that’s given to attendees.Receive a FREE copy of my book, Seven Biblical Insights for Healthy, Joyful, Christ-Centered Marriages.Visit my speaking page for conference and speaking information, including testimonies, endorsements, and contact info. Table of ContentsNotes for the Importance of Family WorshipDeuteronomy 6:7a You shall teach them diligently to your children,Ephesians 6:4 Fathers, do not provoke your children to wrath, but bring them up in the training and admonition of the Lord.Genesis 18:19 (God said), "I have chosen him, that he may (direct) his children and his household after him to keep the way of the Lord by doing righteousness and justice, so that the Lord may bring to Abraham what he has promised him.”Deuteronomy 6:7b and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise.Deuteronomy 6:8 You shall bind them as a sign on your hand, and they shall be as frontlets between your eyes.Deuteronomy 6:9 You shall write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates. Notes for the Importance of Family Worship Romans 8:28 And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose. The question isn’t, “Is God doing something good through this season of lockdown?” The question is, “What is the good God is doing through the Coronavirus?” What do you think? In a recent sermon I shared that we’re the busiest people. We work more hours per week than any other nation. This makes it harder for families to spend time together. God has dramatically slowed us down, and put us together. We had a ministerial it our church yesterday and two pastors observed how this can be a wonderful blessing. According to the National Center for Education Statistics the average number of hours in a public school day is 6.64, and this doesn’t include the time spent walking, driving, or riding the bus to and from school. The average number of school days per year is 180, which adds up to a little under 1,200 hours per year. This means by the time public school students graduate high school they have spent over 15,500 hours away from their parents. How are we using this time? We’re jumping into the Book of Deuteronomy. Who wants to tell me what this book is about? Deuteronomy 6:1 “Now this is the commandment—the statutes and the rules—that the Lord your God commanded me to teach you, that you may do them in the land to which you are going over, to possess it, 2 that you may fear the Lord your God, you and your son and your son's son, by keeping all his statutes and his commandments, which I command you, all the days of your life, and that your days may be long. 3 Hear therefore, O Israel, and be careful to do them, that it may go well with you, and that you may multiply greatly, as the Lord, the God of your fathers, has promised you, in a land flowing with milk and honey. 4 “Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God,
Dec 2 2020
1 hr 10 mins
Learn to Trust God and Walk by Faith – Legacy by Design Interview
Christina Mangino interviews Pastor Scott LaPierre for the Legacy by Design show to help listeners learn to trust God and walk by faith. https://youtu.be/1fq_OBhBt1s Christina Mangino interviews Pastor Scott LaPierre for the Legacy by Design show to help listeners learn to trust God and walk by faith. Pastor Scott is available for interviews as long as he can share openly about his faith. Enjoy work, rest, and family as God intended. As a pastor, husband, and blessed father of eight, Scott LaPierre shares his wisdom of what successful marriages and families do differently: they walk by faith, trust God and do what He says. When we think of walking by faith, our minds probably go to missionaries going overseas to serve in Third World countries or taking on some ministry that terrifies us. But in our day-to-day lives trusting God simply means putting our lives in his hands, letting him lead the way, and trusting that he is bringing about best end as we strive to be faithful. A good approach to the Christian life on this side of heaven is going through each day doing the things God wants us to do while trusting him to pick up the tab. Pastor Scott shares some examples from his life about when God opened and closed doors for him to direct his steps. But he still had to go through those doors, which means he had to trust God and walk by faith. He didn’t know what was on the other side or how things would go for him in the future. Pastor Scott explains that part of leading your family is leading them to do things they don't want to do. Legacy by Design Do you desire a deeper relationship with your family? Make an intention to connect and just be together. You can only leave a legacy you're LIVING. Connecting families, Christina Mangino
Dec 7 2020
49 mins
Let Everyone Be Subject to the Governing Authorities (Romans 13:1)-Appealing Versus Rebelling-Part II
Romans 13:1 says, "Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God." In this sermon Pastor Scott taught on Romans 13 and explained why the WCC elders feel led to submit to the government, and appeal, versus disobey. He also explains why the elders don't think the government is telling us to sin. https://youtu.be/vdHa-YOYUFQ Romans 13:1 says, "Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities." Pastor Scott explained why the elders will submit to government. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for Let Everyone Be Subject to the Governing Authorities (Romans 13:1)Family Worship Guide for Everyone Be Subject to the Governing Authorities (Romans 13:1)Sermon Notes for Let Everyone Be Subject to the Governing Authorities (Romans 13:1)Lesson 1: we don’t submit to sin.Lesson 2: resisting authority is resisting God.Lesson 3: we must (part 1) think biblically versus emotionally.Lesson 3: we must (part 2) balance faith and wisdom.Lesson 4: quarantining the healthy occurred in scripture. Sermon Lessons for Let Everyone Be Subject to the Governing Authorities (Romans 13:1) Lesson 1: We don’t submit to sin (Dan 6:6-10; Jer 27:8-12; Acts 5:29-31, 40-42; 1 Pet 2:13-17). Note: This lesson is from Part I.Lesson 2: Resisting authority is __________________ ______ (Rom 13:1-2; 1 Pet 2:13; Titus 3:1).Lesson 3: We must:(Part I) Think ____________________ versus ______________________ (Rom 13:4).(Part II) Balance __________ and ____________ (Lev 13:1-3).Lesson 4: Quarantining ______ ______________ occurred in Scripture (Lev 13:4-6; Psa 91:6).Lesson 5: We submit because we __________ ______ (1 Pet 2:21-23, 3:5; Psa 20:7). Family Worship Guide for Everyone Be Subject to the Governing Authorities (Romans 13:1) Day 1: Read Rom 13:1-2; 1 Pet 2:13; Titus 3:1, and discuss: What other relationships involve submission? What application does our submission in these relationships have to our submission to government? Who was emperor when Paul and Peter told Christians to submit to authority? Why does resisting authority mean we’re resisting God? Why does Paul say the government is for our good?Day 2: Read Lev 13:1-3, Psalm 91:6 and discuss: Why are all of us tempted to think emotionally about the quarantine versus biblically? As Americans and Christians, discuss the two “laws” over us (the Constitution and the Bible) and our relationships to them. What does it mean to balance faith and wisdom? Come up with some examples of what it looks like to combine faith with wisdom, and faith with foolishness (i.e. “I let my kids play in the road, because I trust God to protect them”).Day 3: Read Lev 13:4-6; 1 Pet 2:21-23, 3:5; Psa 20:7, and discuss: In the Old Testament, why were people quarantined even when they were healthy? What application do you see this having for our current situation? Are you aware of any times in church history when Jews and/or Christians observed God’s cleansing commands and fared better than the rest of the population? How does faith help us submit, whether wives to husbands, Christ when He submitted, or us to government?Bonus: Read Leviticus 13-15 and look for the wisdom in the cleansing commands that were written 3,000 years before the medical community decided they were beneficial. Sermon Notes for Let Everyone Be Subject to the Governing Authorities (Romans 13:1) Two Wednesdays ago the leadership shared that at this time we feel led to submit to the government, and appeal through letters, praying, and fasting. Last Sunday I began explaining why we came to this conclusion about submitting to government, and I’m continuing that explanation this morning. Before we look at the verses let me remind you of the first lesson from last week… Lesson 1: we don’t submit to sin. I left this in your bulletins, so you don’t have this nagging question about how far submission to government ...
Dec 14 2020
1 hr 3 mins
Biblical Narratives Versus Imperatives – Commands in Scripture Have More Weight Than Stories
It is important to understand biblical narratives versus imperatives. Imperatives are commands while narratives are stories or accounts in Scripture that should not be given as much weight. Christians should build their theology with imperatives (or commands, such as Romans 13, 1 Peter 2, and Titus 3) supported by narratives (or accounts) versus the other way around. https://youtu.be/xrdTXz7Xb6g It is important to understand biblical narratives versus imperatives. Imperatives, or commands, should have more weight than narratives. Receive a FREE copy of my book, Seven Biblical Insights for Healthy, Joyful, Christ-Centered Marriages.Visit my speaking page for conference and speaking information, including testimonies, endorsements, and contact info.View all my books on my Amazon author page. Table of ContentsLessons for Biblical Narratives Versus ImperativesFamily Worship Guide for Biblical Narratives Versus ImperativesSermon Notes for Biblical Narratives Versus ImperativesLesson 1: we don’t submit to sin.Lesson 2: Moses appealed to Pharaoh.Lesson 3: David appealed to Saul.Lesson 4: Esther appealed to the king.Lesson 5: let’s not waste this trial. Lessons for Biblical Narratives Versus Imperatives Lesson 1: We don’t submit ____ ______ (Exo 1:15-17). Lesson 2: __________ appealed to ______________ (Exo 3:18-19, 5:2-8). Lesson 3: __________ appealed to ________ (1 Sam 24:4-10, 26:8-25). Lesson 4: ____________ appealed to the ________ (Est 3:13-16, 5:1-2; 9:5, 13-14; Pro 21:1). Lesson 5: Let’s not __________ this __________ (Dan 9:13-14). Family Worship Guide for Biblical Narratives Versus Imperatives Day 1: Read Exo 3:18-19 and 5:2-8 and discuss: Do you see any similarities between the Israelites in Egypt and our current situation? Why did God send Moses to appeal to Pharaoh when He knew Pharaoh would disobey? What implications does this have for us? Day 2: Read 1 Sam 24:4-10, 26:8-25 and discuss: Why was David convicted when he cut off a corner of Saul’s robe? What application does this have for us? Why did it look like God would want David to kill Saul? Why wouldn’t he, and what application does this have for us? Was there a point at which David “disobeyed” Saul or at least wouldn’t go along with his request? What can we learn from this? Day 3: Read Est 3:13-16, 5:1-2; 9:5, 13-14; Pro 21:1, Dan 9:13-14 and discuss: How would you expect the Jews to respond when they learned they’d be slaughtered? How would you expect God to tell them to respond? How did Esther respond? What application does Pro 21:1 have to our current situation? How could we waste the trial we’re experiencing? How can we ensure we don’t waste it? What do you think God wants us to learn? Sermon Notes for Biblical Narratives Versus Imperatives On Wednesday, April 29th, the elders joined me in the sanctuary to share w/ all of you that at this point in time we feel led to submit to the government and appeal through letters, praying, and fasting. There might be a point at which we disobey, but we don’t believe we’ve reached that point yet. We tend to project ourselves on others, and b/c if I was in your position I would want to know how my elders came to this decision, I felt like you’re entitled to an explanation. So I’ve been explaining how we came to this decision over the last two Sundays, and this morning will be the third and final message. I could be wrong, but I don’t think another sermon on this topic is necessary. I feel like people are pretty settled where they are more teaching won’t be beneficial. One thing I’ve shared w/ you is that there are godly people on both sides of this issue, and they can quote other godly people. In the first sermon I told you that I’ve landed where I have b/c I think we should build our theology w/ imperatives – or commands – supported by narratives – or accounts…versus the other way around. In other words: We should look for imperatives, such as those found in 1 Pet 2,
Dec 21 2020
1 hr 5 mins

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