Let’s Talk: youth mental health, culture and identity

Orygen

Produced by Orygen, Australia’s centre of excellence in youth mental health, the “Let’s talk: youth mental health, culture and identity’ podcast is a series of interesting and informative conversations exploring youth mental health and culture, designed particularly for the youth mental health workforce. You can find out more at www.orygen.org.au/letstalk

Teams and systems
Nov 24 2021
Teams and systems
In our final episode, we discuss the importance of policy, and the need to understand how complex and different systems can impact on the mental wellbeing of multicultural young people and families.  We discuss joint policy work between Orygen and the Centre for Multicultural Youth and other organisations and learn from our guests’ insights into the mental health system and ways to bring about change. GUESTS:Dave Baker, principal policy advisor at Orygen; Willow Kellock, policy officer with the Centre for Multicultural Youth; Sobur, an intern at CMY who hosts a social group for young women in Melbourne TJ, youth participation program manager at Orygen who is also involved with other community projects. FURTHER INFORMATION: Let’s Talk webpage“Responding together. Multicultural young people and their mental health.” Centre for Multicultural Youth - Centre For Multicultural Youth (cmy.net.au)Embrace framework.  © 2021 OrygenThis publication is copyright. Apart from use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968 and subsequent amendments, no part may be reproduced, stored or transmitted by any means without prior written permission of Orygen.Suggested citation Let’s talk. Youth mental health, culture and identity. Melbourne: Orygen; 2021.Disclaimer This information is provided for general educational and information purposes only. It is current as at the date of publication and is intended to be relevant for all Australian states and territories (unless stated otherwise) and may not be applicable in other jurisdictions. Any diagnosis and/or treatment decisions in respect of an individual patient should be made based on your professional investigations and opinions in the context of the clinical circumstances of the patient. To the extent permitted by law, Orygen will not be liable for any loss or damage arising from your use of or reliance on this information. You rely on your own professional skill and judgement in conducting your own health care practice. Orygen does not endorse or recommend any products, treatments or services referred to in this information.Orygen acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands we are on and pays respect to their Elders past and present. Orygen recognises and respects their cultural heritage, beliefs and relationships to Country, which continue to be important to First Nations people living today.Orygen is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health.
Trauma
Nov 4 2021
Trauma
This episode focuses on trauma, the importance of understanding trauma and ways to build safety and responsiveness in our work with young people and communities who have been impacted by trauma. Rudy Gonzales, our first guest, is General Manager Practice and Sector Development at Foundation House, Melbourne. Rudy shares the work he does to ensure a whole service is trauma informed and is experienced as safe and responsive by people attending.Rudy shares the importance of looking at every element of a service and the work of building trust as well as why he feels it’s a privilege to do the work that he does.Rudy has extensive experience working with people from refugee backgrounds and migrant communities, and has had a number of key roles in the sector. He has, co-authored a book on therapeutic and residential care from an attachment and trauma lens, and has personal experience as a member of a survivor community.  Oliver Tye, Orygen’s First Nations Statement of Commitment Coordinator joins us again to discuss the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experiences of trauma, including generational impacts. Building on strengths and identity relating to culture and community are some of the insights Oliver shares. FURTHER INFORMATION:Let’s Talk webpageLearn from us – Foundation HouseRefugee NetworkCultural atlas- SBSFASSTT, the ‘Forum of Australian Services for Survivors of Torture and Trauma’, they are an umbrella body with links on their website to all state based Torture and Trauma support services.  Info and resources for working with refugee related trauma. Targeted at education professionals but relevant more widely. Hints For Healing (startts.org.au)Foundation House – Schools in for Refugees is similar to Hints for Healing but Victoria based.Journeys to Healing Report.A New Paradigm, Menzies, 2020.Healing Our Way.Miller and Berger 2020​​​  © 2021 OrygenThis publication is copyright. Apart from use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968 and subsequent amendments, no part may be reproduced, stored or transmitted by any means without prior written permission of Orygen.Suggested citation Let’s talk. Youth mental health, culture and identity. Melbourne: Orygen; 2021.Disclaimer This information is provided for general educational and information purposes only. It is current as at the date of publication and is intended to be relevant for all Australian states and territories (unless stated otherwise) and may not be applicable in other jurisdictions. Any diagnosis and/or treatment decisions in respect of an individual patient should be made based on your professional investigations and opinions in the context of the clinical circumstances of the patient. To the extent permitted by law, Orygen will not be liable for any loss or damage arising from your use of or reliance on this information. You rely on your own professional skill and judgement in conducting your own health care practice. Orygen does not endorse or recommend any products, treatments or services referred to in this information.Orygen acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands we are on and pays respect to their Elders past and present. Orygen recognises and respects their cultural heritage, beliefs and relationships to Country, which continue to be important to First Nations people living today.Orygen is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health.
Community
Oct 28 2021
Community
Our three guests in this episode are all young people with youth advisory or youth participation roles. We hear from W. Georges, Devika and TJ about their work in different community projects that build connection, trust and knowledge to support multicultural young people with their mental wellbeing.TJ is youth participation program manager at Orygen, working to ensure that young people are actively involved in decision making processes, and projects that feed into outcomes that will ultimately impact young people, their families and their communities.W. Georges is on the advisory group for the Centre for Multicultural Youth and is also involved in elite level sports, working to reach and engage young people with disadvantage.Devika returns to talk about her work on Orygen’s Youth Advisory Council, and her work with a range of different communities. FURTHER INFORMATION: Let’s Talk webpageMulticultural Youth Advocacy Network.Emerging Minds.Koori Youth Council.Mahana Culture (training): Street:Mercy Care WA is an example of a service providing community support services.   © 2021 OrygenThis publication is copyright. Apart from use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968 and subsequent amendments, no part may be reproduced, stored or transmitted by any means without prior written permission of Orygen.Suggested citation Let’s talk. Youth mental health, culture and identity. Melbourne: Orygen; 2021.Disclaimer This information is provided for general educational and information purposes only. It is current as at the date of publication and is intended to be relevant for all Australian states and territories (unless stated otherwise) and may not be applicable in other jurisdictions. Any diagnosis and/or treatment decisions in respect of an individual patient should be made based on your professional investigations and opinions in the context of the clinical circumstances of the patient. To the extent permitted by law, Orygen will not be liable for any loss or damage arising from your use of or reliance on this information. You rely on your own professional skill and judgement in conducting your own health care practice. Orygen does not endorse or recommend any products, treatments or services referred to in this information.Orygen acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands we are on and pays respect to their Elders past and present. Orygen recognises and respects their cultural heritage, beliefs and relationships to Country, which continue to be important to First Nations people living today.Orygen is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health.
Intersectionality
Oct 21 2021
Intersectionality
In this episode, we discuss intersectionality and how mental health workers and systems can assist vulnerable young people to improve their health outcomes and wellbeing. Our first guest is, Dr Tinashe Dune, is Associate Professor in Inter-Professional Health Sciences at Western Sydney University. Dr Dune shares with us her research in marginalisation and health and a recently published book on cultural practice she co-edited. Also joining us is Anita Ogbeide, who has a master’s degree in Public Health and is a casual academic at Western Sydney University. Anita is also a practice manager at a psychology practice that provides culturally safe and competent services to diverse clients.Our third guest is Budi Sudarto, a trainer and consultant in diversity and inclusion. We talk with Budi about the need to understand both privilege and vulnerability as well as approaches to training organisations to improve how they work with vulnerable young people. FURTHER INFORMATION:Let’s Talk webpageAGMC Inc.  LGBTIQ Multicultural / CALD Support and Advocacy.Stigma watch, SANE AustraliaVTMH article: Intersectionality, mental health & COVID-19Culture, Diversity and Health in Australia: Towards Culturally Safe Health Care (textbook). The book Dr Tinashe Dune and Anita Ogbeide refer to in the interview.Intersectionality in Psychology: A Rainbow Perspective.Living and Loving in Diversity – An Anthology of Australian Multicultural Queer Adventures. Pallotta-Chiarolli, Maria. Ed.Growing up Queer in Australia.Writing Themselves in 4Navigating Intersectionality: Multicultural and multifaith LGBTIQ+ Victorians talk about discrimination and affirmation can be accessed here:  Principles of Cultural Safety for Mental Health Care PractitionersThe 8 principles of cultural safety for mental health care practitioners have been taken from the book Culture, Diversity and Health in Australia: Towards Culturally Safe Health Care (textbook), co-edited by Dr Tinashe Dune.Principle 1: Consistent self-awareness and self-reflection.Principle 2: Reflecting on social constructions, social determinants of health and intersectionality.Principle 3: Exploring diversity and difference in experiences and expectations of health and wellbeing.Principle 4: Becoming familiar with the principles of cultural safety.Principle 5: Understanding the importance of cultural safety and its relevance to health policy and advocacy.Principle 6: Engaging in culturally safe healthcare practice.Principle 7: Applying principles for cultural safety with diverse populations.Principle 8: Evaluating the impact of cultural safety in practice. © 2021 OrygenThis publication is copyright. Apart from use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968 and subsequent amendments, no part may be reproduced, stored or transmitted by any means without prior written permission of Orygen.Suggested citation Let’s talk. Youth mental health, culture and identity. Melbourne: Orygen; 2021.Disclaimer This information is provided for general educational and information purposes only. It is current as at the date of publication and is intended to be relevant for all Australian states and territories (unless stated otherwise) and may not be applicable in other jurisdictions. Any diagnosis and/or treatment decisions in respect of an individual patient should be made based on your professional investigations and opinions in the context of the clinical circumstances of the patient. To the extent permitted by law, Orygen will not be liable for any loss or damage arising from your use of or reliance on this information. You rely on your own professional skill and judgement in conducting your own health care practice. Orygen does not endorse or recommend any products, treatments or services referred to in this information.Orygen acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands we are on and pays respect to their Elders past and present. Orygen recognises and respects their cultural heritage, beliefs and relationships to Country, which continue to be important to First Nations people living today.Orygen is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health.
Core skills for clinicians
Oct 14 2021
Core skills for clinicians
In this episode we hear from two experienced clinicians who share some of what they have learned through their work and some of the key skills for assisting  multicultural young people in mental health settings. Tess Jolley is our first guest. Tess is a senior practitioner in the Child, Youth and Family program at Foundation House (Western Region). The Victorian Foundation for Survivors of Torture, Foundation House’s mission is to advance the health, wellbeing and human rights of people from refugee background who have experienced torture or other traumatic events in their country or origin or while fleeing those countries. Tess is a Social Worker, has a Masters in International Development and has worked with refugee and asylum seeker young people for approximately10 years including more than   five years at Foundation House. Tess speaks about and shares examples of her work and that of Foundation House more broadly. Note: since this episode was recorded, Tess has left Foundation House for a position in a different organisation. We welcome again to the podcast, Sonya, a community development clinical specialist at Orygen. Here she discusses what she has learned in her clinical and community development work and shares some approaches and skills she integrates into her work with multicultural young people and their families. FURTHER INFORMATION:Let’s Talk webpageFoundation House.Foundation House: Services for young people.Foundation House: Approach. Multicultural Mental Health Resource Centre, Canada: Cultural Formulation  Guidelines for Cultural assessment and Cultural Formulation | Cultural Consultation Service - McGill University.Cultural Formulation Interview Version A | Cultural Consultation Service - McGill University. © 2021 OrygenThis publication is copyright. Apart from use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968 and subsequent amendments, no part may be reproduced, stored or transmitted by any means without prior written permission of Orygen.Suggested citation Let’s talk. Youth mental health, culture and identity. Melbourne: Orygen; 2021.Disclaimer This information is provided for general educational and information purposes only. It is current as at the date of publication and is intended to be relevant for all Australian states and territories (unless stated otherwise) and may not be applicable in other jurisdictions. Any diagnosis and/or treatment decisions in respect of an individual patient should be made based on your professional investigations and opinions in the context of the clinical circumstances of the patient. To the extent permitted by law, Orygen will not be liable for any loss or damage arising from your use of or reliance on this information. You rely on your own professional skill and judgement in conducting your own health care practice. Orygen does not endorse or recommend any products, treatments or services referred to in this information.
Identity
Oct 7 2021
Identity
This episode further explores the importance of identity for multicultural young people, families and communities in the youth mental health space. Our first guest in this episode is Sonya, who is an occupational therapist with over 12 years’ experience in mental health in a broad range of settings including public and private. She has worked with young people and adults individually, in groups, and has experience in training. Currently Sonya works at Orygen as a Community Development Clinical Specialist and she shares what she has learned through her work as well as something of her own experience as a person of multicultural background. Devika joins us again in this episode to explore the complexity of identity and her own development. We also touch on the impact of mental health of services on a person’s identity. FURTHER INFORMATION:Let’s Talk webpage © 2021 OrygenThis publication is copyright. Apart from use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968 and subsequent amendments, no part may be reproduced, stored or transmitted by any means without prior written permission of Orygen.Suggested citation Let’s talk. Youth mental health, culture and identity. Melbourne: Orygen; 2021.Disclaimer This information is provided for general educational and information purposes only. It is current as at the date of publication and is intended to be relevant for all Australian states and territories (unless stated otherwise) and may not be applicable in other jurisdictions. Any diagnosis and/or treatment decisions in respect of an individual patient should be made based on your professional investigations and opinions in the context of the clinical circumstances of the patient. To the extent permitted by law, Orygen will not be liable for any loss or damage arising from your use of or reliance on this information. You rely on your own professional skill and judgement in conducting your own health care practice. Orygen does not endorse or recommend any products, treatments or services referred to in this information.Orygen acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands we are on and pays respect to their Elders past and present. Orygen recognises and respects their cultural heritage, beliefs and relationships to Country, which continue to be important to First Nations people living today.Orygen is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health.
How do culture and youth mental health interact?
Sep 30 2021
How do culture and youth mental health interact?
In our first episode, we begin to explore some large ideas. What is culture? And how do culture, mental health and identity intersect? Our first guest is Wardandi Noongar man Oliver Tye, who is the First Nations Statement of Commitment Coordinator at Orygen. Oliver shares the different ways of seeing culture, mental health and identity of First Nations young people, and the importance of understanding the impact of colonisation. He also discusses some of the most important changes we can make when working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people and communities. Also, joining us is Devika Krishnan, a member of Orygen’s Youth Advisory Council, who is passionate about advocating for and empowering many communities including those of immigrants and refugees. Devika discusses mental health and culture broadly, as well as discussing her own experience of seeking mental health support.FURTHER INFORMATION:Let’s Talk webpageCOAG Health Council Cultural Respect Framework 2016-2026.Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health: An Overview.Yarning About Mental Health.Working Together.QAIHC Youth Health Strategy 2020-2023​.Cultural Security is an Ongoing Journey. © 2021 OrygenThis publication is copyright. Apart from use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968 and subsequent amendments, no part may be reproduced, stored or transmitted by any means without prior written permission of Orygen.Suggested citation Let’s talk. Youth mental health, culture and identity. Melbourne: Orygen; 2021.Disclaimer This information is provided for general educational and information purposes only. It is current as at the date of publication and is intended to be relevant for all Australian states and territories (unless stated otherwise) and may not be applicable in other jurisdictions. Any diagnosis and/or treatment decisions in respect of an individual patient should be made based on your professional investigations and opinions in the context of the clinical circumstances of the patient. To the extent permitted by law, Orygen will not be liable for any loss or damage arising from your use of or reliance on this information. You rely on your own professional skill and judgement in conducting your own health care practice. Orygen does not endorse or recommend any products, treatments or services referred to in this information.Orygen acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands we are on and pays respect to their Elders past and present. Orygen recognises and respects their cultural heritage, beliefs and relationships to Country, which continue to be important to First Nations people living today.Orygen is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health.