PODCAST

The Global Novel: a literature podcast

Claire Hennessy

The Global Novel is a podcast that shares a critical lens on the narrative features of world literatures from antiquity to modernity and aims to make academic education in literature accessible to the world.

Episode 19 Chinese Strange Writings of "The Six Dynasties" (222-589AD)
May 19 2022
Episode 19 Chinese Strange Writings of "The Six Dynasties" (222-589AD)
Are ghost stories real? And why do people write and read ghost stories in early medieval China? Prof. Robert Ford Campany, Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Chair of Humanities, from department of East Asian Studies at Vanderbilt University will shed light on a distinctive Chinese narrative genre called "zhiguai"(志怪) or Chinese strange writings. Prof. Campany is among the first group of scholars to systematically trace, study and theorize this Chinese narrative genre.Recommended readings (paid links):Robert Ford Campany, A Garden of Marvels: Tales of Wonder from Early Medieval China, University of Hawaii Press, 2015. (primary text)Robert Ford Campany, Signs from the Unseen Realm: Buddhist Miracle Tales from Early Medieval China, University of Hawaii Press, 2012.Robert Ford Campany, To Live as Long as Heaven and Earth: A Translation and Study of Ge Hong's Traditions of Divine Transcendents, University of California Press, 2002.Robert Ford Campany, Strange Writing: Anomaly Accounts in Early Medieval China, State University of New York Press, 1996.Judith T. Zeitlin, "xiaoshuo" in Franco Marretti ed. The Novel, Vol.1 For aficionados of Classical Chinese language: 中國古代志怪小說選一中國古代志怪小說選二This episode is able to be delivered to you in high quality because of Prof. Campany's generous donation Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show
Episode 17 The Tale of Genji and Its Translation
Mar 22 2022
Episode 17 The Tale of Genji and Its Translation
The Tale of Genji (or Genji Monogatari) is a classic work of Japanese literature written in the early 11th century by the noblewoman and lady-in-waiting Murasaki Shikibu. The work recounts the fictional life of Hikaru Genji, or "Radiant Prince", who is the son of an ancient Japanese emperor (known to readers as Emperor Kiritsubo) and a low-ranking concubine called Kiritsubo Consort. Due to the intense political conflicts at the court and out of protection for his son,  the emperor removes Genji from the line of succession, demoting him to a commoner by giving him the surname Minamoto, so that he pursue a career as an imperial officer. The tale concentrates on Genji's romantic life and describes the customs of the aristocratic society of the time. With us today is Prof. Edward Kamens, Sumitomo Professor of Japanese Studies, East Asian Languages and Literatures at Yale University. Prof. Kamens will share his expertise on the history of the work’s translations as well as how other modes of  interpretation shape  our understanding of the work.Reading List (paid links):Murasaki Shikibu, The Tale of Genji Edward Kamens, "Flares in the Garden,Darkness in the Heart: Exteriority, Interiority, and the Role of Poems in The Tale of Genji," in Studies in Modern Japanese Literature: Essays and Translations in Honor of Edwin McClellan For aficionados interested in Japanese versions:Shin Nihon koten bungaku taikei Shin Nihon koten bungaku zenshuBuzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show
Episode 10 The Book and The One: Part II How Jesus's Story Is Told
Nov 2 2021
Episode 10 The Book and The One: Part II How Jesus's Story Is Told
In this episode, we will discuss the story of Jesus narrated in the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. We will  focus on the nature of the narrative, and especially, how the story is told, and what its narratological premise is based upon, one that intriguingly retells one of the most significant historical moments in our civilization. This episode is guest-lectured by FRONTLINE PBS: From Jesus to Christ: The First Christians (free link).  Our research approach and discussion perspectives coincide with those of the documentary,  which are largely historical and archeological. The purpose and significance of adopting such approaches are, to quote Bart D. Ehrman, author of the book Jesus, Interrupted (paid link), that “whether you are a believer, fundamentalist, evengelical, moderate, liberal or a nonbeliever,  coming to understand what the biblical narative actually is and is not, is one of the most important intellectual endeavors that anyone in our society can embark upon.”Commentators in the PBS documentary are : Michael White, Professor at University of Texas, AustinHolland L Hendrix, President., Inion Theological SeminaryEric  M. Meyers, Professor at Duke UniversityAllan Callaham, Associate Professor at Harvard Divinity School,John Dominic Crossan, Professor at Depaul UniversityPaula Fredriksen, Professor at Boston UniversityWayne A Meeks, Professor at Yale UniversityHarold D. Attridge, Professor at Yale Divinity SchoolElaine Pagels, Professor at Princeton UniversitySupport the show
Episode 9 The Book and The One: Part I Biblical Accounts of Jesus
Oct 20 2021
Episode 9 The Book and The One: Part I Biblical Accounts of Jesus
In this episode, we will discuss the story of Jesus narrated in the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. We will  focus on the nature of the narrative, and especially, how the story is told, and what its narratological premise is based upon, one that intriguingly retells one of the most significant historical moments in our civilization. This episode is guest-lectured by FRONTLINE PBS: From Jesus to Christ: The First Christians (free link).  Our research approach and discussion perspectives coincide with those of the documentary,  which are largely historical and archeological. The purpose and significance of adopting such approaches are, to quote Bart D. Ehrman, author of the book Jesus, Interrupted (paid link), that “whether you are a believer, fundamentalist, evengelical, moderate, liberal or a nonbeliever,  coming to understand what the biblical narative actually is and is not, is one of the most important intellectual endeavors that anyone in our society can embark upon.”Recommended Readings:The Gospel of Mathew, The New Testament (free link) Commentators in the PBS documentary are : Michael White, Professor at University of Texas, AustinHolland L Hendrix, President., Inion Theological SeminaryEric  M. Meyers, Professor at Duke UniversityAllan Callaham, Associate Professor at Harvard Divinity School,John Dominic Crossan, Professor at Depaul UniversityPaula Fredriksen, Professor at Boston UniversityWayne A Meeks, Professor at Yale UniversityHarold D. Attridge, Professor at Yale Divinity SchoolElaine Pagels, Professor at Princeton UniversitySupport the show