PODCAST

Tech Transforms, sponsored by Dynatrace

Carolyn Ford

Tech Transforms: More Than Meets the Eye. Global technology is changing the way we live. Critical government decisions affect the intersection of technology advancement and human needs. This podcast talks to some of the most prominent influencers shaping the landscape to understand how they are leveraging technology to solve complex challenges while also meeting the needs of today's modern world.

Start Here
Security Metrics: Measure Twice, Cut Once with Rick Stewart
Jun 22 2022
Security Metrics: Measure Twice, Cut Once with Rick Stewart
Rick Stewart, Chief Software Technologist at DLT Solutions joins Tech Transforms to give insight on Open Source, Platform One, and DORA initiatives. Listen in as Carolyn and Mark learn about the importance of focusing on the right metrics when managing security bottlenecks. Episode Table of Contents[00:48] Old Ways of Doing Things [11:55] Security Metrics That Need Improvement [22:54] Deploying Security Metrics Using Scheduling Techniques [33:19] Continuous Authority to Operate Security Metrics Episode Links and Resources (Rick Stewart ) (DLT Solutions) (Beyond Order) Old Ways of Doing ThingsCarolyn: Today, we get to talk to (Rick Stewart), a good friend. Rick Stewart is a Chief Software Technologist at DLT for more than 34 years. Do you really want me to tell people that Rick? That makes you sound super old? Rick: No, it has some relation to the old way of doing things, traditional ways. Carolyn: He knows the old stuff and the new stuff with 34 years of diverse experience in the IT industry. He’s progressing through technical and leadership roles in telecommunications, mobile entertainment, the federal government, and the manufacturing industries. Today, Rick is joining us to talk about DevOps research and assessments, or DORA, a term that is new to me. He’ll also talk about the four key metrics for increasing efficiency and delivering service. He will discuss how Platform One has advanced the cultural transformation to DevOps. Mark: Welcome Rick. By the way, Rick started this when he was six. Carolyn: That's right. I'm going, to be honest. I've been in the industry for a while, and I have never heard the term DORA. DevOps Research and Assessments make sense. I just haven't heard the acronym. They have four key metrics for increasing efficiency in delivering service. Those metrics are deployment frequency, lead time for changes, change failure rate, and time to restore to service. Will you unpack those for us? Rick: It's interesting that you say that because I attend several different events and conferences where we have, especially in the public sector, astute people that have lots of experience. Security Metrics As a First-Class CitizenRick: They're on this journey of DevOps or in the public sector. It's more DevSecOps, bringing security up as a first-class citizen. They were talking about the things that they capture, the journey that they're on, and their improvements. On one of these occasions, DORA was brought up. I think it may be a Q&A panel. It was surprising that a lot of them didn't know what this organization does, especially being so well versed in the cultural transformation, not knowing some of the things to focus on. I thought it was really important to shine a light on. Carolyn: Is it a federal organization? Rick: No, it's more of a community-based organization, an industry-based organization. We've got people like Jez Humble and Gene Kim and others that are involved with this. What they do is, they go out and they do surveys of not just the public sector, but the private sector, all organizations globally. They basically give them surveys and they talk about their experience, where they're at in the spectrum of their journey, and what they have discovered through this analysis. It's a really deep, long analysis. There's a book called Accelerate that was done by Nicole Ferguson. She has a PhD and took lots of painstaking analysis of these organizations and these teams and asked them a series of questions. What it boiled down to is
Security Metrics: Measure Twice, Cut Once with Rick Stewart
Jun 22 2022
Security Metrics: Measure Twice, Cut Once with Rick Stewart
Rick Stewart, Chief Software Technologist at DLT Solutions joins Tech Transforms to give insight on Open Source, Platform One, and DORA initiatives. Listen in as Carolyn and Mark learn about the importance of focusing on the right metrics when managing security bottlenecks. Episode Table of Contents[00:48] Old Ways of Doing Things [11:55] Security Metrics That Need Improvement [22:54] Deploying Security Metrics Using Scheduling Techniques [33:19] Continuous Authority to Operate Security Metrics Episode Links and Resources (Rick Stewart ) (DLT Solutions) (Beyond Order) Old Ways of Doing ThingsCarolyn: Today, we get to talk to (Rick Stewart), a good friend. Rick Stewart is a Chief Software Technologist at DLT for more than 34 years. Do you really want me to tell people that Rick? That makes you sound super old? Rick: No, it has some relation to the old way of doing things, traditional ways. Carolyn: He knows the old stuff and the new stuff with 34 years of diverse experience in the IT industry. He’s progressing through technical and leadership roles in telecommunications, mobile entertainment, the federal government, and the manufacturing industries. Today, Rick is joining us to talk about DevOps research and assessments, or DORA, a term that is new to me. He’ll also talk about the four key metrics for increasing efficiency and delivering service. He will discuss how Platform One has advanced the cultural transformation to DevOps. Mark: Welcome Rick. By the way, Rick started this when he was six. Carolyn: That's right. I'm going, to be honest. I've been in the industry for a while, and I have never heard the term DORA. DevOps Research and Assessments make sense. I just haven't heard the acronym. They have four key metrics for increasing efficiency in delivering service. Those metrics are deployment frequency, lead time for changes, change failure rate, and time to restore to service. Will you unpack those for us? Rick: It's interesting that you say that because I attend several different events and conferences where we have, especially in the public sector, astute people that have lots of experience. Security Metrics As a First-Class CitizenRick: They're on this journey of DevOps or in the public sector. It's more DevSecOps, bringing security up as a first-class citizen. They were talking about the things that they capture, the journey that they're on, and their improvements. On one of these occasions, DORA was brought up. I think it may be a Q&A panel. It was surprising that a lot of them didn't know what this organization does, especially being so well versed in the cultural transformation, not knowing some of the things to focus on. I thought it was really important to shine a light on. Carolyn: Is it a federal organization? Rick: No, it's more of a community-based organization, an industry-based organization. We've got people like Jez Humble and Gene Kim and others that are involved with this. What they do is, they go out and they do surveys of not just the public sector, but the private sector, all organizations globally. They basically give them surveys and they talk about their experience, where they're at in the spectrum of their journey, and what they have discovered through this analysis. It's a really deep, long analysis. There's a book called Accelerate that was done by Nicole Ferguson. She has a PhD and took lots of painstaking analysis of these organizations and these teams and asked them a series of questions. What it boiled down to is
Improving the User Experience in a Zero Trust World: Event Recap with Willie Hicks
Jun 15 2022
Improving the User Experience in a Zero Trust World: Event Recap with Willie Hicks
Willie Hicks, CTO of Public Sector at Dynatrace joins Carolyn and Mark to unpack the recent ATARC event: Improving the User Experience in a Zero Trust World. At this federal breakfast summit, sponsored by Dynatrace and Amazon Web Services, we heard from some of the most prominent technology leaders focused on Zero Trust including Nicole Willis, Jamie Holcombe, Mickey Iqbal, and more. Listen in as Mark and Willie give highlights and takeaways from the event. Be sure to follow the link in the show notes to see the full event On-demand! Episode Table of Contents[00:30] Guest Speakers at the ATARC Event: Improving the User Experience in a Zero Trust World [07:55] Zero Trust Should Be a User Experience Enabler [14:41] OMB Is Pushing to Move Too Fast [20:05] How to Ensure Zero Trust Does Not Disrupt the Employee User Experience Episode Links and Resources (Willie Hicks) (Summit On-demand) (Nicole Willis) (Jamie Holcombe) (Mickey Iqbal) (Grant Schneider) (Tom Suder) Guest Speakers at the ATARC Event: Improving the User Experience in a Zero Trust WorldCarolyn: So today we're reviewing top takeaways from ATARC 's Federal Breakfast Summit, Improving the User Experience in a Zero Trust World. Which those two things, user experience, and zero trust, are kind of a direct conflict for me, but we'll get to that. The conference was sponsored by AWS and Dynatrace, and it's available on-demand for our listeners at ATARC.org. Also, we have Willie Hicks, our Federal Chief Technologist at Dynatrace. Willie, you were a keynote speaker at the event. I'm too biased to say you were my favorite so I won't say that. I mean, everybody was really good. Jamie was super exciting. Let me just review who our speakers were. So our keynote speaker around zero trust was Grant Schneider. He brought a really interesting perspective because he's former white house. So he was the senior director of cybersecurity services. So former federal CISO, and now he's in industry at Venable. Then we had our next keynote around the user experience was the very entertaining Jamie Holcomb. He's the CIO at U.S. Patent and Trademark office. And then my favorite, Willie, Federal Chief Technology Officer here at Dynatrace. Then we had a panel that brought the user experience and zero trust together and how we reconcile those two and how they work together. And on that panel, we had Nicole Willis, Chief Technology Officer, OIG, at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Is User Experience Unrelated to Zero Trust?Carolyn: Jamie came back on the panel. We had Mickey Iqbal, he's the Public Sector Solution Architect and Chief Technologist at Amazon Web Services. Willie on the panel. And then we had our moderator, Tom Suder, who's fantastic. He's been in this business so long that he had a lot of really good insights too. Now that I've given our listeners the overview of who participated, first of all, I was thrilled to see that we had a packed room. We had a standing room only, and that was really, really nice to see. It was lovely to have people in person and to be able to interact with one another personally. So, all right, let's get to the first question. Today, Mark, you're less of a co-host. I want to hear your opinions about what your takeaways were from that day. So around the user experience and zero trust, did you have any aha moments? What were your favorite moments? Tell me your feelings about the day. Mark: Well you know, from my perspective, coming from industry and Dynatrace, I think we think of end-user experience as something different related to zero trust. So we think of it differently. Carolyn: And at odds with each other.
Hyperautomation with Bob Stevens
Jun 8 2022
Hyperautomation with Bob Stevens
This week, Carolyn is joined again by Bob Stevens, AVP Public Sector at GitLab, this time to talk about the power of hyperautomation. Listen in as Carolyn learns what can be gained through fast, accurate application security. Episode Table of Contents[00:32] What is Hyperautomation [09:02] What Has Changed in Hyperautomation Episode Links and Resources (Bob Stevens) (Malcolm Gladwell: Blink) What is HyperautomationCarolyn: I'm excited to welcome back Bob Stevens, Area Vice President of Public Sector at GitLab. Bob is a seasoned veteran in public sector technology with over 36 years of experience. As the AVP at GitLab, he is responsible for helping government organizations become more productive, efficient, and effective. Bob has experience on both the industry and the government side of things. Prior to industry, he served in the United States Air Force as a computer specialist at the White House Communications Agency. Today, we are going to talk about artificial intelligence, machine learning, and what hyperautomation is exactly. Why Bob thinks it will be 2022's biggest trend. Bob, welcome back to Tech Transforms. Bob: I'm happy to be here. Thank you. Appreciate it. Carolyn: I'd like to talk about an episode that you just did with GovExec Daily. And on this episode, you mentioned that hyperautomation will be 2022's biggest trend. I'm going to be honest. I haven't really heard hyperautomation. And I get automation. I can deduce what hyperautomation is, but I would love for you to explain it to me. What's the difference between automation, hyperautomation, DevOps, all of that? Bob: Yes, I mean, it's the strict definition of the word. It's rapidly identifying, vetting in automated processes in order to produce whatever it is that you're working on as fast as you possibly can. And it trends today because if you think about the government space, they have a lot of compliance issues that they need to deal with. The Benefits of HyperautomationBob: If they can automate those compliance processes and ensure that when they build software, in the end it's going to be compliant and they don't have to go back and vet it. I mean, that's going to save them a world of time. Carolyn: Are you talking about missed compliances, automating some of those missed controls? There's 300 of them, I think. Bob: Yes, those. I think you're talking about FedRAMP. Carolyn: Yes. One of. Or authority to operate has all of those. Right? I mean, I don't know all the details. Bob: Yes, no. There's the STIGs. That the government has to put all software through and that's all about compliance. The government has to get the authority to operate, ATOs, for everything that they run. Carolyn: And renew them every two or three years. Bob: Or sooner. It depends on how much of a change occurred in the application. If you can hyperautomate all of that by the use of AI or machine learning. Again, and so by the time you produced that software, all those compliance issues are addressed. You know they're addressed because you've got confidence in the system and the way that it was done. It didn't require as little human intervention as possible, which is unfortunately, where some mistakes are injected. Then you've saved a world of time and you've made life really, really easy for the folks that are doing the development. As well as the folks that are using the applications in the end. Because they don't have to sit and wait to get the authority to operate, which sometimes can take a year.The Bad News: We Haven’t Tried HyperautomationCarolyn: Is the differentiator between automation, DevOps, and hyperautomation really adding in, automating those compliances? And are you telling me that that hasn't happened before now? Bob: Unfortunately, it has not happened. I mean, that's evident by the fact that the government still has to produce...
A Company Culture We Can Trust with Sara Jones
Jun 1 2022
A Company Culture We Can Trust with Sara Jones
Sara Jones, CEO of InclusionPro joins Carolyn and Mark to talk about all things diversity, equity, and inclusion. Sara explains gaps in authenticity and perception and gives tech leaders everywhere new goals to strive for when it comes to company culture. Episode Table of Contents[00:54] Why We Always Go Back to Company Culture [10:38] How Leaders Respond to Employees’ Desire [23:03] What Attracts People of Color to Apply [30:54] Why Leaders Avoid the Important Things About Company Culture [41:37] What Technology Can Never Replace Episode Links and Resources (Sara Jones) (Inclusive Research and the Authenticity Gap) (TED Talk: My story of love and loss as a transracial adoptee) (SheTech) (SUU Women In Tech) (Sorenson Communications) (Ariel Alternatives) (Battlestar Galactica) Why We Always Go Back to Company CultureCarolyn: Today I am really happy to have Sara Jones with us. Sara's a friend and we've spoken before. Almost all of our guests, even though we're talking about tech, they always go back to culture. We're going to talk about that with Sara today. Sara Jones is the CEO of InclusionPro. She has over 20 years of experience in technology, business development, law, and leadership. You were a practicing attorney, right Sara? Sara: For 10 years. I'm still recovering. Carolyn: So as the CEO of InclusionPro, her mission is to guide leaders in building inclusive company culture that promotes team performance and team innovation. She's written a book recently called Inclusive Leadership and the Authenticity Gap, that we get to talk about today. Sara: Thank you. And this is a fun opportunity for me to merge my love of technology with diversity, equity, and inclusion. As most folks know, it is pretty hard to do. I've had a couple of decades talking about this, so hopefully, we can share some really great learnings. Most importantly, I think for the folks listening that might be thinking "DEI again." Carolyn: Which stands for? Sara: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. A lot of things have shifted. I think a lot of folks come to this type of conversation with the old thinking in mind. I'd just like to invite listeners to get rid of what you know. Just be open to hearing some new thoughts around diversity, equity, inclusions, and things that we're able to do now that we weren't able to do even five years ago. That's my little plug for saying, "Open-minded today?" InclusionProCarolyn: That leads really nicely into my first question about being a recovering attorney, your love for tech. What inspired you to create InclusionPro? Sara: InclusionPro is the end of a long 20-year journey having diversity, equity, inclusion as part of my personal career journey. Now, it may not be part of everyone's and a significant part of that is because I did start in patent law. Having an engineering degree and a law degree, put me in an industry that had only 5% women and people of color. I get a lot of people that are like, "Oh, our industry has no women." I'm like, "Yes, I've been there." I actually know what it's like. It's not like I came from academia or some area that was just flushed with a lot of diversity. I have lived this and I understand the impacts of it at a very personal level. But I also have been an executive. I know the challenges of being an executive, those operational aspects and how it really works in business. There's some big misalignments that can happen that we need to talk about when we get to this idea of authenticity. What is the individual need versus the larger organizational...
So What? Federal News Roundup on Remote Work with Elizebeth Varghese
May 25 2022
So What? Federal News Roundup on Remote Work with Elizebeth Varghese
Join us on Tech Transforms Federal News Round-up segment, So What? Hosted by Carolyn Ford and Tracy Bannon. This week, we talk to Elizebeth Varghese, Global and Americas Leader – HR Transformation Client Offerings at IBM about one of the biggest topics in federal news: remote work. Listen in to find out how agencies can implement a smarter protocol, how remote work impacts the trust equation and the role technology can play in the workforce culture. Episode Table of Contents[00:40] The Future of Work for Federal Employees [11:28] Work-Life Balance Expectations in a Remote Work [19:01] Big Push in In-Person Protocol [26:12] Do You Need a Home Office for Remote Work? [32:01] Provide Options to Persuade People to Stay and Junk Remote Work [39:04] The People Who Are Not Approving Remote Work Episode Links and Resources (Elizebeth Varghese) (IBM) (South Asian Youth Action) (Three Ways the Future of Work Must Change for Federal Employees) (Hybrid work for many is messy and exhausting) (Welcome Back to the Office. Isn't This Fun?) (Thousands of employees are testing a 4-day workweek starting today: ‘It’s inevitable we’ll see bigger companies doing this) (Super Better by Jane McGonigal) ([Block] Chain Reaction) The Future of Work for Federal EmployeesCarolyn: This month, we're hosting Elizebeth Varghese, Global & America's Leader: Client Offerings in Talent and HR Strategy at IBM. And outside of IBM she's an active board member at South Asian Youth Action, a nonprofit providing after-school programming, education, and college support. She was recognized as Global Top 100 Influencer in HR for 2020. And we are glad to have you joining us today, Elizebeth, to discuss returning to the office, the great resignation, and companies potentially switching to a four-day workweek hybrid, all of that. Welcome Elizebeth, how are you? Elizebeth: Great, thank you so much, Carolyn. Wonderful and delighted to be here. Great to be back on here with Tracy as well, friend from a couple of years ago as we've been going through some of these pandemic podcasts. So thank you for inviting me and I am looking forward to this. Carolyn: Yes, well this one's going to be a fun one and it might get a little heated. I've already seen some stuff on LinkedIn. I'm like, oh, that gets my blood boiling about returning to the office. And I want to start off with a question, there's an article called "Three ways the future of work must change for federal employees." The article states that at the end of the day, we need to have an IT and HR Alliance. This was due to exceptional communication between the agency's chief information officer and HR functions. In your experience, is the relationship between IT and HR something government agencies need to improve on? And industry too? Does the Relationship Between IT and HR Need Improvement?Elizebeth: Now what we've seen, the pandemic is highlighted so nothing new. This was happening for a while. I have to preface it with that. Because I think in lots of our conversations we hear this thing about, hey, this is what the pandemic caused. The pandemic caused a lot of suffering and hardship for many people, but it highlighted things that were in play for many years. And the fact the intersection of HR data and how IT's using it and accessing it has been an eternal...
The Speed of the Mission with Bob Stevens
May 18 2022
The Speed of the Mission with Bob Stevens
Bob Stevens, AVP Public Sector at GitLab joins Tech Transforms to talk about the imperative mission of DevOps to combine efficiency, speed and security. With emphasis on empowering teams to fail fast, moving security to the left, and a deep dive into Platform 1, you won't want to miss this episode! Episode Table of Contents[00:27] DevSecOps’ Speed of the Mission [09:02] The Cultural Shift That Needs to Occur to Upgrade the Speed of the Mission [19:21] The Future of DevOps Episode Links and Resources (Bob Stevens) (Platform 1) (Dateline Podcast) (Alex Cross Series ) (John Wick) DevSecOps’ Speed of the MissionCarolyn: This week Bob Stevens, Area Vice President of Public Sector at GitLab is joining me. Bob is a seasoned veteran in public sector technology with over 25 years of experience. As the AVP at GitLab, he is responsible for helping government organizations become more productive, efficient, and effective. Bob also has experience on both the industry and the government side of things. Prior to industry he served in the United States Air Force as a computer specialist at the White House Communications Agency. I am excited today to dive in and talk about the ways that we can use DevOps to modernize and secure government IT, and what the outlook for DevOps is. How are you doing, Bob? Bob: I'm doing great. The weather's getting better in DC, so it's good to see the sun from time to time versus what we've had. But yes, doing fantastic. Carolyn: Well, good to hear it. So let's just dive in. And let's walk through what DevOps is and why implementing these practices is critical to helping modernize and improve government IT? Bob: Great. So I guess DevOps is combining efficiency, speed, and security all into one. And creating software at what I like to refer to as the speed of the mission for the government. The business side is a little different. But for the government, it's all about the mission and you being able to accomplish the mission faster and stay ahead of our adversaries. In the case of DoD and on the civilian side, it’s to ensure that all of the citizens that any given agency supports gets the best possible support that they can. If you look at the organizations like the Veterans Administration. You can imagine they've got a lot of applications that they've written. The Platform the Government Is Looking For to Improve the Speed of the MissionBob: To help the vets accomplish what they need to accomplish in a timely manner. So DevOps really will help them to produce the software at speed, more securely, more efficiently, and provide the most or the best service that they possibly can to all of the veterans out there, just as one example. Carolyn: So, you know Tech Transforms is vendor agnostic. And I would love for you to just take a couple of minutes and talk about how GitLab helps with that. And just what GitLab does. I've read the marketing statements and it's a little nebulous for me. I would love to have you explain what GitLab does and how it's helping agencies achieve this? Bob: I appreciate that you're letting me do this in a vendor-agnostic community. I mean, there are a lot of tools that are required to produce software. But the way that the industry or the government in particular is heading, and you can see this in some of the articles that DoD has recently released. Is they're looking for one platform that encompasses the entire software development life cycle. As you can imagine right now, I know agencies that have anywhere from 14 to...
Observability Explained with Mike Maciag
May 11 2022
Observability Explained with Mike Maciag
Mike Maciag, Chief Marketing Officer at Dynatrace joins Tech Transforms to talk about the power of observability. Careful monitoring is of paramount importance for any successful operation, and observability can take your agency to the next level. Listen in as Carolyn and Mark get some tips and tricks for improving cybersecurity posture with the most accurate technology. Episode Table of Contents[00:31] The Vital Role That Observability Plays in IT [10:40] Observability: When You’re Asking the Systems to Share [22:48] The President’s Memo on User Experience [34:01] Let Machines Do the Stuff That Doesn’t Matter Episode Links and Resources (Mike Maciag) (Dynatrace) (American Moon Shot) The Vital Role That Observability Plays in ITCarolyn: Today, we get to welcome Mike Maciag, who is Chief Marketing Officer of Dynatrace. One of our own, one of the clan is here with us today. And as CMO, Mike is responsible for Dynatrace's global marketing organization. We're really excited to hear his expert opinion on observability and the vital role that it plays in IT, and especially the cloud. Mike: Thank you, Carolyn. Mark, nice to be with you both today. And I know this is a long time in coming, but I'm excited to be sitting down and talking to you today. Carolyn: We've been able to talk to a few of our guests a little bit about APM. And just recently we talked to a former CIO at VA. He is very bullish on APM, and he talked a lot about the advances that they were able to make in the VA with APM. Just that at least within the VA, APM moved from a nice to have to a must-have. And what I'd really like to hear you talk about, just to dive right in, Mike, is so there's the APM part. But then in my mind and I might be positioning this wrong. In my mind, I think that observability is like APM 2.0. But can you speak to that APM versus observability? What's the difference? Mike: As long as we're talking about terms, we might want to mix monitoring in there as well. All terms that are thrown around, is it monitoring, is it APM, is it observability? And it's changed, it's changed a lot. Let me start with the simplest definition, then maybe we can unpack it from there. Think of observability as the umbrella term, as the broadest umbrella term that goes above all of this. Monitoring, APM, ObservabilityMike: Observability fully includes APM, and observability also subsumes monitoring, both of the things that we've been doing. There are kind of two megatrends in the industry that have been driving this move towards observability. One is the move to the cloud.More and more systems are moving to cloud architectures, probably more important digitally native architectures. We're going from monolithic systems that we could understand, that we could see, that we could touch. We could understand what's happening with them into cloud increasingly complex, even multi-cloud architectures that are driven by microservices and the like. The reason for that movement is it has made digital transformation, application development faster and easier in that regard. Which is this digital transformation fundamentally looking at everything that I've been doing in every aspects of my business. Whether it be on the front end or in the services I provide. Whether it be on the front end or in the backend machine to machine conversations is happening in cloud architectures. And we're trying to figure out how we can automate more of it and things are happening that way. Does that make sense, just from a starting point, from observability’s umbrella, fully subsumed monitoring, fully subsumed APM, kind of in that the drivers being cloud and digital transformation making that happen. And I can get into more details. Mark: That absolutely hits the mark. And we also say end-user performance or...
Threat Team Purple with Richard Ford
May 4 2022
Threat Team Purple with Richard Ford
Richard Ford, Chief Technology Officer at Praetorian joins Tech Transforms to talk about the cyber security threat landscape. Red team versus Blue team is a common and effective threat protection practice, but what could cyber security experts gain from team Purple? Listen in as Carolyn and Mark learn about the importance of managing your attack surface, implementing multi-factor authentication, and protecting against cyber phishing attacks. Episode Table of Contents[00:30] Our Biggest Cybersecurity Threat in the Last Quarter [07:39] Which Is Easier: Defense or Offense [16:40] Why Do We Need Single Sign-on [24:54] The Team Purple Idea Episode Links and Resources (Richard Ford) (Praetorian) (The Clothes in the Wardrobe) (Sauces and Shapes) (Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking) (Game Changer) Our Biggest Cybersecurity Threat in the Last QuarterCarolyn: So today our guest is actually an old friend, (Richard Ford), who is (Chief Technology Officer at Praetorian). For over 25 years, Richard has been able to design and implement NextGen product strategies and provide customers with the best threat detection available. Today, we're going to talk to Richard about the cyber threat landscape and what a good defense looks like. Richard: Hi, it's nice to be back on a call with you Carolyn, and Mark, it's good to see you. Carolyn: Yes, really good to have you today. So let's just jump right in. I want to know what your view is, what are our biggest cybersecurity threats? What does the cyber security threat landscape look like and how do we defend ourselves from it? So there's like three-part question there. Richard: So, we're starting with an easy question. I think the threat landscape is incredibly messy and I think that the most important part to think about is change. So if you think about just the last quarter or two that we've gone through you had, like log4shell someone we're all running around looking for log4j vulnerabilities. Then it's Spring4Shell, which wasn't as serious, but was still pretty nasty if you were impacted. The problem, we have this tremendous rate of change so the thing that was important to you yesterday may not be the thing that's important to you today. It's unlikely to be the thing that's most important for you tomorrow. So when we think about the threat landscape, the first thing to say is, if I give you an answer, it's like looking at a single, still image from a movie and telling you've watched the movie, right?Cyber Security Threat LandscapeRichard: Then as soon as we go click, you know that threat landscape will change. With that said, I do think there are some common themes that keep coming back, right? So there's a threat we have around being desperately short of people. There's a threat around, we don't know what assets we have. Even if we did know what assets we have, we don't know what they're running. Then the business conditions are driving us forward so quickly that it's difficult to keep security on the front burner. It sometimes drops to the back burner so we don't think about security as much. Perhaps, as how do I meet these business objectives that we have. I think this has created this sort of very unpleasant, perfect storm that will keep us well on our toes. I don't know, for the next couple of decades, it feels like. Carolyn: So when you say that we're constantly moving forward, changing, at the same time, I mean, are we still dealing with like SolarWinds? So as we're having to look to the future, we're still dealing with all the shit that's happened even a year, two...
So What? Tech Transforms Federal News Round-up with Katy Craig
Apr 27 2022
So What? Tech Transforms Federal News Round-up with Katy Craig
Join us on Tech Transforms Federal News Round-up segment, So What? Hosted by Carolyn Ford and Tracy Bannon. This week, we talk to Katy Craig, retired Navy Chief, now Adjunct Faculty at National University, & Director, Security Architecture at Aquia, Inc. about some of the biggest news in the federal space. Listen in to hear her thoughts around deep fakes, non-traditional warfare, and President Biden's recently released announcement to protect against cyber attacks. Episode Table of Contents[00:25] Monthly Federal News Roundup [02:20] Federal News #1: President Biden’s Cyber Security Fact Sheet [10:12] The Catalyst [14:24] Federal News #2: Zelenskyy’s Deepfake [20:55] Federal News #3: The Threat Model [25:26] Federal News #4: Russia Is Running Out of Storage Space Episode Links and Resources (Katy Craig) (Aquia) (Fact Sheet) (Order 14028) Monthly Federal News Roundup Carolyn: This week, we are launching our newest series, 'So what?' It is Tech Transforms' federal news roundup. Every month, Tracy Bannon, senior principal at MITRE joins me to unpack some of the biggest trending news topics in federal technology. Tracy, we've been trying to do this, make this happen for a while. I am so happy that this is our inaugural episode. Tracy: Thank you. I'm really excited because there's so much incredible stuff going on and we keep talking and now we want to talk with others and I'm doubly excited to have a good friend and mentor with us today for our first episode, Katy Craig. Carolyn: Yes, and Katy is a return guest. We've had her in the past on Tech Transforms and Katy is Acquia's chief of staff, cyber security expert, and retired Navy chief. Today, we're going to talk about, really the number one headline in the news these days. We keep hearing terms like nontraditional warfare, which is essentially the fifth domain of cyber, and President Biden's recent cyber security fact sheet. And just what it all means, like why is it all happening right now? And I want to just go straight to President Biden's recent announcement, this fact sheet that is. (It's titled 'Act Now to Protect Against Potential Cyberattacks'.) I want to go to you Tracy, and just unpack this for us. What does it mean? Federal News #1: President Biden’s Cyber Security Fact SheetTracy: So I believe it was March 21st, the White House released this set of guidance and it is really practical, general guidance. And it really is focused on two different areas. It's kind of like for everybody, for corporate America back up your data, use multifactor authentication, encrypt your data. There's also a call to arms, to tech companies and software organizations that says, you know what, there's a NIST standard and we have an order out here, it's order 14028. We can provide all the links later. But those two things, they're saying we got to get real about this. And the reason that it came out now is that we need to hear it now with all of the things that are going on in the Ukraine. It was an opportune time. We've had all kinds of security incidents and breaches and other things over the last year or two, but there are some shockers that are coming to the surface that made this very timely for the White House to release this guidance.Carolyn: So you really feel like this guidance came out because of the war in Ukraine? Tracy: I think it was probably teed up before that, probably for quite a while. None of goes very quickly. Any kind of guidance that comes out in this way has good generalized information. I would've put it out a year or two ago...
Women in Tech Part 2 with Space Force's Jazmin Furtado and U.S. Army's Kris Saling
Apr 20 2022
Women in Tech Part 2 with Space Force's Jazmin Furtado and U.S. Army's Kris Saling
Listen in for part 2 of our women's panel with Kris Saling, Chief Analytics Officer for the Army Talent Management Task Force and Director of People Analytics in the office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower & Reserve Affairs), and Jazmin Furtado, Liaison at AI Accelerator and Data Strategy Lead at US Space Force. In this episode, Carolyn, Kris, and Jazmin get real about the power of the collective, emerging solutions, and the importance to assess and provide within federal government technology. Episode Table of Contents[00:31] Meditation Is Really Good [07:40] Where Are We Going With AI [13:14] Are Women in Tech Paid Equal Like Their Male Counterparts [20:40] Tell People How Much You’re Making Episode Links and Resources (Kris Saling) (Jazmin Furtado) (M&RA) (Space Force) (Market Connections Survey) Meditation Is Really GoodCarolyn: We are in part two of our women in technology panel, with Kris Saling, Deputy Director of Army People Analytics, and Captain Jazmin Furtado a Data Strategy Lead at the US Space Force and Space Force Liaison at the MIT AI Accelerator. On today's episode, we're going to dive more into government technology in general. I get Kris and Jazmin to do a little fortune-telling on where tech is headed. What advancements they've seen in their careers. And we get real with some salary talk. Just a little reminder, the views of Kris and Jazmin are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of their agencies. Now let's get to it on Tech Transforms with our women panel. I know that meditation is really good for the monks that live in caves in India. And I know that I should probably do it. Until I saw the science behind it and what it can really do for my brain. I dabbled in it. I never fully embraced it. And once I started understanding why it was working and that there was true science behind it, man, I'm all in. I'm just thinking of just one example of things that are good for me in my life, that I've been able to embrace and bring into my life because I understand them. I understand how they work rather than like you said, Kris, the leadership saying, "No, we don't give a shit about how you got there. Just give us the answer." Make The Process More EfficientCarolyn: But now you're getting people who really want to understand why. I would imagine that the program for the answers that you've been spoonfeeding them. The programs are becoming a lot more powerful and effective. Because the people who are taking those in the past spoonfed answers. Now really understanding them can truly implement them at a level that is a lot more powerful. Is that true? Kris: I would say that's definitely true because we're working on a couple of projects right now where we are trying to integrate machine learning into promotions and selections as a decision support tool. I'd never in a million years, would've thought we'd get a chance to work on that data and introduce something that is an algorithm into a just intrinsically human process. But we have enough people thinking along this vein. We have enough people looking at the data we've collected about how we read records and how we read files. And they're like, "There's got to be an easier way to do this. There's got to be something we can do to support the board, to pull out the key insights. To package them differently, to display them differently, to sort." And they came to us with the question of how can we make this process more efficient? And I just came back with exactly what the computer is supposed to do. It doesn't get tired, it doesn't get bored. Its attention doesn't wonder, and it can read things a whole heck of a lot faster than we can. So let's see how we can...
Women in Tech Part 1 with Space Force's Jazmin Furtado and U.S. Army's Kris Saling
Apr 13 2022
Women in Tech Part 1 with Space Force's Jazmin Furtado and U.S. Army's Kris Saling
Women in tech unite on this special episode of Tech Transforms featuring Kris Saling, Chief Analytics Officer for the Army Talent Management Task Force and Director of People Analytics in the office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower & Reserve Affairs), and Jazmin Furtado, Liaison at AI Accelerator and Data Strategy Lead at US Space Force. Carolyn, Kris and Jazmin discuss the impact of self-awareness and the importance of data education and fostering change when it comes to government technology. Episode Table of Contents[00:27] Introducing the Women in Tech: Kris Saling & Captain Jazmin Furtado [10:32 ] Take It From a Human Approach [17:27] Pulling Other Women in Tech Into the Circle [24:45] Women in Tech Are Influencing One Another [30:14] Women in Tech Are Making Sure They’re Helping Everybody Episode Links and Resources (Kris Saling) (Jazmin Furtado) (M&RA) (Space Force) Introducing the Women in Tech: Kris Saling & Captain Jazmin FurtadoCarolyn: This week we are going full girl power, so Mark got uninvited. Today we have our Women In Tech panel featuring a couple of guests who have previously been on our show, Kris Saling, Deputy Director of Army People Analytics, and Captain Jazmin Furtado, a Data Strategy Lead at the U.S. Space Force and Space Force Liaison at the MIT AI Accelerator. Welcome back Jazmin and Kris to Tech Transforms to talk about your journeys in government technology. I'm really excited to talk to both of you again, but before we get into that let me do a little housekeeping. So I just want to remind our listeners that the views of both Kris and Jazmin are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of their agencies. I'm just going to say that for myself, too. Because I warned this, too, before we started. I'm like, "I got some stuff I need to get out." And I want to be able to talk freely today. Let's start talking about challenges that both of you have faced being a woman in the technology space. The fact that we even have to say, "Being a woman in the government technology space," other than, we're in the technology space and we kick ass. I hate that we have to do that but I still feel like we do. I'm already getting up on my soapbox. But, let's start with you, Kris. Some of the challenges that you've faced. Kris: So, it's one of those where I don't want to say there aren't any challenges. But I've encountered so many of these challenges throughout my career. I just hit 20 years last summer, I'm going to hit 21 years this coming summer. Yes, it's almost the summer again. Kris Saling’s Challenges for Being One of the Women in TechKris: So it's been a long time of sitting there with the typical, the anxieties, the imposter anxiety, the "What is my balance between being assertive. And how do I not come off as, "Insert your," kind of "The common anxieties"? It really hasn't been all that different. I've been trying to figure out the right balance of how to present different things. How to present facts so that they are listened to. How to present data to an audience where not only do we have the schism between having an audience that's operational and I'm on the technical side. But sometimes it's very obvious that I know quite a bit more about the subject than the people I'm talking to. I think one of the biggest challenges is I really didn't get to know myself and how I wanted to present these things. Because I was very much fixed on how to present that particular image until I really got into data education and started teaching people. That really helped me find a balance in how I wanted to talk about very technical subjects, both with a technical and a lay audience.So I won't say it's overcome all the challenges. You still go out a lot of times, still the only woman...
Monitor Applications with Empathy with Bill James
Apr 6 2022
Monitor Applications with Empathy with Bill James
What does it mean for an agency to monitor applications with empathy to achieve successful mission outcomes? Bill James is the President of Federal Business LLC and FedSmarts LLC. He is also a former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Development and Operations in the Office of Information and Technology at the Department of Veterans Affairs. He joins Carolyn and Mark to talk about the importance of application monitoring, culture, and empathy when executing a mission. Episode Table of Contents[00:30] Introducing Our Guest, Bill James [09:29] The Onus of the User Experience [20:33] Applications Monitoring Is Integrated into the VA Process Episode Links and Resources (Bill James) (FedSmarts LLC) (Federal Business LLC) (Department of Veterans Affairs) Introducing Our Guest, Bill JamesCarolyn: So today, our guest is (Bill James). He is president of Federal Business LLC. In his previous role as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Development and Operations in the office of Information and Technology at the Department of Veterans Affairs, Bill led the VA's largest information technology organization to deliver enterprise-wide technology products and services to veterans. He has been able to carry those skills into his current role as president of Federal Business LLC. And today, we're going to get Bill's perspective on why Application Performance Monitoring or APM is no longer a luxury, but a necessity. And he just recently put out a blog that, I'm going to nerd out here, I really like the blog. It's easy to understand. One of the things he says in it, or some of the perspectives we're going to get from him, is how APM for VA software applications is necessary now and critical for the future. And how it helps the VA, and I'm going to throw in there, like any organization, any agency, avoid or recover from outages, increase VA OIT productivity and observability, offer insights into investments needed for innovation and understand and improve the customer experience of veterans. I love that last bit. The customer experience. Bill: Thank you very much, Carolyn and Mark. I'm really happy to be here today, and you've touched one of my hot buttons. I'm really interested in all of it, how the technology ultimately relates and improves the end-user experience. Specifically and particularly, our veterans. And that's why I loved working at the VA so much. Focus On Veterans’ ExperienceCarolyn: Well, and that topic I feel like is especially timely Mark. Especially with the presidential executive order around user experience. I mean, you're kind on the cutting edge, Bill. I mean, you've been doing this before it was cool. You've been worried about the customer experience. Bill: That's right. I grew up as a programmer, a coder, and as a mathematician. It was always interesting to me how we could build a code and write it. And we thought our job was done when we hit the end card, back in the day when we had punch cards. But that wall, was frankly was a false wall, and what we never thought through, I think clearly enough into what that code actually did for the end-user. So I think with the new executive order and clearly the focus on the veterans' experience in the VA, that wall came crumbling down for me particularly. It was really a great place to work and a great place to exercise this whole idea of customer experience from the IT perspective specifically. Carolyn: We're definitely going to dive more into that. Before we go there, for our listeners that may not be as familiar with application performance monitoring or APM, will you give us a quick definition of what that is? Bill: Yes. It's the heartbeat of your systems, and specifically of software. So, many folks have gone to the doctor or seen these...
Consolidation, Innovation and Perspective with Eric Trexler
Mar 30 2022
Consolidation, Innovation and Perspective with Eric Trexler
Consolidation, innovation, and perspective all need to work together in government IT according to Eric Trexler, VP of Global Governments and Critical Infrastructure Sales at Forcepoint. IT acts as an enabler of business in the challenging landscape of government technology. Listen in to find out what Eric believes the United States IT space should be focusing on in order to stay ahead of the adversaries. Episode Table of Contents[00:25] All About Innovation with Eric Trexler [10:39] An Enabler of the Business [18:27] We Haven’t Seen Consolidation [21:37] Choosing Fiefdom Over Consolidation and Innovation [27:49] The Commercial Component of Innovation [32:32] There Are Productivity Gains Out of Innovation Episode Links and Resources (Eric Trexler) (Forcepoint) (To the Point Cyber Security) (Think Again) (The Generals) All About Innovation with Eric TrexlerCarolyn: Today, our guest is Eric Trexler, Vice President of Global Governments and critical infrastructure at Forcepoint. Eric is an expert in the technology industry with more than 25 years of experience with both the public and private sectors. And Eric and I used to host To The Point Cybersecurity podcast together. So today is actually a real treat for me to see your face again, Eric. So, good morning. Eric: Good morning. And it's bizarre being back on the air with you, Carolyn. Carolyn: So, today, we're going to talk about the perplexing and growing cost of cybercrime and how we can shift the paradigm. But before we jump into that, Eric, you have actually a pretty fascinating background. So, can you just tell us a little bit about your journey? Eric: My journey in IT? Or where would you like me to start? Carolyn: Let's not go all the way back to birth. Let's start at your Airborne Ranger days. How about that? And then how you got to where you are today. So yes, technology. Eric: So, I was an aimless kid at about 17 with no potential to pay for college. No easy path at the time. And I said, I'm joining the army against my mother's wishes to become an Airborne Ranger. The Requirement to Be a Navy SEALCarolyn: At 17? Eric: Yes. She had to sign the paperwork so I could join the delayed entry program. The military throws at you when you have a high ASVAB score, that's the entrance. And I had a high ASVAB score. So, I saw the Navy and they wanted me to be a nuclear engineer. And I just wanted to be a Navy SEAL back in the day before people knew what the Navy SEALs were. But you had to pick a rating, I believe they call it in the Navy. So, I'm sitting in front of the recruiter, and he's like, "Okay, but what do you want to do?" And I'm a dumb kid, I'm 17 years old. "I want to be a Navy SEAL." "Well, you can't do that. You have to have a rating. You have to have this skill at trade." And nothing, absolutely nothing was interesting to me. So, I left. I went to the army recruiter and enlisted. Because they'd let me be an airborne, I was unassigned airborne, technically. How I became an Airborne Ranger? I didn't want to be normal and I was in jump school and talked to a gentleman and I didn't want to wear chemical gear. This was right at the end of the first Gulf War, and everybody was running around in MOPP suits. If you remember that MOPP suits? Hot, heavy, you can't see. MOPP GearMark: You can't breathe. Eric: Same reason I didn't want to be in a tank or a ship or a plane. I wanted to be on my feet and I wanted to be...
Unparalleled Innovation with Jennifer Ewbank, Deputy Director for Digital Innovation at Central Intelligence Agency
Mar 23 2022
Unparalleled Innovation with Jennifer Ewbank, Deputy Director for Digital Innovation at Central Intelligence Agency
Jennifer Ewbank, Deputy Director for Digital Innovation at Central Intelligence Agency joins Carolyn and Mark to talk about the unparalleled work in integration and integration she and her teams are doing. Jennifer talks about the importance of partnerships in IT, data and cybersecurity and how Digital Innovations, the newest branch of the CIA, is transforming security. Episode Table of Contents[00:58] Jennifer’s Opinions on DDI’s Unparalleled Innovation [08:35] Integration of Digital Capabilities and Unparalleled Innovation [16:06] Unparalleled Innovation on Cloud Computing [24:04] Unparalleled Innovation in the Digital Landscape [32:00] Applying Unparalleled Innovation Into Our Mission [39:44] A Space Nerd With Unparalleled Innovation Episode Links and Resources (Jennifer Ewbank) (CIA.gov) (Full Digital Nation) (The Party) (2034) (The Girl With Seven Names) Jennifer’s Opinions on DDI’s Unparalleled InnovationCarolyn: Today, our guest is (Jennifer Ewbank), Deputy Director of CIA for Digital Innovation, also known as DDI. Jennifer is responsible for accelerating the development and integration of digital and cyber capabilities across all of the CIA's mission areas. We're so excited to hear from you today, Jennifer, and get your opinions on the DDI and its contributions to the CIA. Jennifer: Thank you so much for the invitation, I'm really excited about our conversation today. I love nothing more than sharing a little bit about the great work that the men and women of the CIA are doing on behalf of the American people. To talk about how this intelligence landscape is changing dramatically along with the digital transformation we see around the world. We're here on the 1st of March. I wanted to acknowledge that, as we have a conversation today about one of these topics I love tremendously. It's really critically important for the intelligence business, it is taking place against the backdrop of events unfolding in Eastern Europe. So, just about a week ago, Russian troops invaded a sovereign nation and brought war back to the European continent in a completely unprovoked act. I just wanted to assure anyone who might be listening to the podcast that the CIA is intensely focused on our national security around the world. We're focused on that crisis and working as part of an integrated US government team to do what we can to bring about a rapid end to these senseless hostilities and the return of Russian troops to the Russian Federation.Unparalleled Innovation on What Matters MostJennifer: I just wanted to ensure, whenever people listen to this, that they understand that we are focused on what matters most at the moment. I'm taking a few minutes out of an otherwise very hectic day to talk about this topic. It’s really important from a strategic perspective but is perhaps not the most urgent topic on our plates today. Carolyn: Honestly, what you do is integral and so important to everything that you just mentioned. Let me see if I can get the words out right but in supporting the sovereign nation. What you do with the digital side of things and this mission, that cyber domain is incredibly important. Jennifer: Yes, we've seen it play out a bit so far in unprovoked attacks on Ukrainian entities. Our role, sometimes, may not be known to those outside of the intelligence community and that's most of America. We work for the US government, we work for the US people, absolutely. But we also support our allies and partners
Government Technology In Sight with Mike Gruss
Mar 16 2022
Government Technology In Sight with Mike Gruss
Mike Gruss, Editor-in-chief at Sightline Media Group has eyes on news related to all things DOD. He and his reporters are asking the smart questions when it comes to government defense technology. IT savvy leadership, user experience, and gamification are just some of the topics Mike unpacks in this episode of Tech Transforms. Episode Table of Contents[00:38] The Biggest Trending Topics in Government Technology [09:11] The Lethality of Government Technology [20:05] Predictions for Government Technology in 2022 [31:22] How the Government Technology Is Put Together Episode Links and Resources (Mike Gruss) (Sightline Media Group) (DoD) The Biggest Trending Topics in Government TechnologyCarolyn: Today we get to talk to (Mike Gruss), editor-in-chief at Sightline Media Group. He’ll discuss some of the hottest topics in the IT industry. Sightline Media Group is the leading news organization covering military, defense, public sector, federal technology, C4ISR, and cyber defense. Today, Mike unpacks some of the biggest trending topics in government technology. We also get his perspective on the DoDs advancement in technology. Mike, I love having you on the show because you have such a broad knowledge. You really have your finger on the pulse of what's happening in the government. So you're over a lot of publications. Can you tell our listeners briefly about your role as editor in chief of Sightline Media Group and the different publications you oversee? Mike: Sightline oversees a number of brands, as you mentioned. I like to think of us as the largest national security newsroom in the country. We have two or three different buckets that our publications fall into. What we've really concentrated on the last year or so is working collaboratively across the newsroom. You may recognize specific brands, but I think our reporters are working across several brands or across the newsroom. There's the military times brands, which are Military Times, Army Times, Air Force Times, Navy Times, and Marine Corps Times. Those are geared toward the troops and you'll see those publications, obviously online. They're available at commissaries, and then there's also our business to government groups. What’s Happening With the Government TechnologyMike: Those are publications like defense news, which covers the defense industry and what's happening at the Pentagon and on Capitol Hill, the business and politics of defense acquisitions. And also C4ISR net, which focuses more on that network warfare aspect of the defense industry. The last publication we have is Federal Times. It focuses on the federal workforce and what they need and what's happening there on a day-to-day basis. It's a lot, but we have a really passionate and skilled newsroom that thinks hard about these issues. They work really hard to get scoops up and to get enterprise news stories that will help people understand what's happening at their job and make better decisions every day at work.Carolyn: I love the specialization. Obviously, you get a lot of stories that are going to be broad across. But when you take it and get specific to the mission of the different branches and the different missions, I really appreciate that. Mike: I don't like to use the word expert because I think it's overused. But I'd say all of our reporters have a tremendous amount of knowledge in their field. They work really hard to ask smart questions, to be able to explain issues clearly and to know the nuances. I think that comes through in our reporting. Carolyn: I definitely agree and I would absolutely use the word expert. Talk about your perspective on how the DoDs are making advancements in government technology. Do you think they're taking the right steps right now? Mike: This is a difficult question and I think there's such a push-pull that we have...
Unstoppable Women of Web3: Learn and Be Curious with Sandy Carter
Mar 7 2022
Unstoppable Women of Web3: Learn and Be Curious with Sandy Carter
Sandy Carter, Unstoppable Domains SVP and Channel Chief again joins Carolyn and Mark, this time to discuss the importance of diversity in technology. She gives us an exciting inside look at her event, Unstoppable Women of Web3. Sandy walks the walk when it comes to getting women and girls involved in tech. Follow her on social media to get the latest updates! Episode Table of Contents[00:55] The Vision for Unstoppable Women [05:42] Unstoppable Women Are Learning About IOT and Machines [11:09] A Dream to Start the Groundswell With Unstoppable Women Episode Links and Resources (Sandy Carter) (Unstoppable Domains) (Unstoppable Women of Web3) (Web3) The Vision for Unstoppable WomenCarolyn: So we have (Sandy Carter) back. The last time we talked to her, she gave me the 101 on Web3 and FTs, crypto. My head's still swimming a little bit but I'm actually really excited about it. She did a great job and one of the key things that Sandy talked about was for Web3 to be the vision that she has for it and to be really strong, it needs diversity. Today, we're back with Sandy Carter, renowned technologist, bestselling author, and current senior VP at Unstoppable Domains. She's one of the leading pioneers in the digital business and also a former Fortune 25 business executive. She is a leader focused on helping companies with innovation and digital transformation through culture and technology like AI and the internet of things. So let's jump into it. As an advocate for diversity and women in technology and your involvement within girls in tech, what advice would you give to women pursuing roles in technology today? Sandy: There's a couple of things. Technology is moving at such a pace that I think you need to develop this learn and be curious notion. Probably, what you're studying today in school or what you're doing today at your job will change significantly. Top Jobs Today for Unstoppable WomenSandy: I was on the diversity group for the World Economic Forum and one of the interesting pieces of data that they shared with us was that the top jobs today in technology didn't exist five years ago. So unless you're going to be stuck in an old legacy role which will decline over time, you've got to be continuously learning and curious about what's coming so that you're ready to go in a lot of those new areas and those new fields. Carolyn: How do we stay current? Getting a degree is a good foundation and things are changing so often. What are some conferences or certifications that you would recommend for women in tech? Sandy: There is a lot of really good material out there. There's so many classes and things that you can take just to refresh yourself, like YouTube. One of the things I do is to dedicate time every week. I mark an hour in my calendar every week. It probably could be more, but at least, an hour every week to check out something that I don't know about. Maybe it's quantum computing or spatial computing or a new thing that's happening in Web3. I'm always constantly on that front edge.I still remember when I was with IBM and I got selected to lead a lot of our artificial intelligence work. People were like, "Wow, you're so lucky to get to do artificial intelligence." I would say, "No, I'm not lucky. I've been studying this. I took two classes at MIT. I've been playing around with this. I was learning and being curious about it so that when this opportunity came, I was ready." Where We Are Today With TechnologySandy: So if you're just doing your day job today, I don't think it's enough. In fact, I have two daughters and they love Alice in Wonderland. One of the parts I love so much about that book is, Alice said, "I had to run twice as fast just to stay in place."...
Web3: The Start of the Power with Sandy Carter
Mar 2 2022
Web3: The Start of the Power with Sandy Carter
Sandy Carter, SVP and Channel Chief at Unstoppable Domains and former Vice President at Amazon Web Services talks about the groundbreaking work she is doing with Web3. Listen in to get more information on Web3 capabilities and hear about the chaotic creation that Unstoppable Domains is taking on. Episode Table of Contents[00:53] A Leading Pioneer in Web3 and Digital Transformation [08:280] A Hot Topic Element of Web3 [15:12] Women Are Getting Involved With Web3 [23:04] What Web3 Means for the Government Episode Links and Resources (Sandy Carter) (Unstoppable Domains) (Unstoppable Women of Web3) (Uber) A Leading Pioneer in Web3 and Digital TransformationCarolyn: Today, we're talking to (Sandy Carter), and I'm excited to have her all to myself. Sandy is a renowned technologist, bestselling author, and current senior VP at Unstoppable Domains. She is one of the leading pioneers in the digital business, and a former Fortune 25 business executive. She’s a leader focused on helping companies with innovative and digital transformation through culture and technology, like AI and Internet of Things. Sandy, you have an incredible background. You've been with IBM, recently with Amazon Web Services, and now you're working with Unstoppable Domains. I would love for you to tell us your story. What is the journey that you've had with your career? How did you get to Unstoppable Domains, and what is it? Sandy: Well, it's really interesting. You'll notice in all of my companies, IBM, and then you missed a startup. I had a startup in between and then AWS, and then now a startup with Unstoppable. All of those companies were on the leading or bleeding edge of technology. At the time I was at IBM, we were bleeding edge for social media and business, which was that Web 2.0 era. I then went to form my own company and I was doing artificial intelligence. In fact, I thought it was so cool. I was doing like a Myers-Brigg on companies to determine their culture so that we can match them with the right innovation tactic. That way, they didn't go and try something that didn't fit their culture, because culture eats strategy for lunch.Developing the Right Processes for Web3Sandy: Then I moved on to Amazon, and Amazon was all about the cloud, another tech transformation that was going on. I learned so much from each of these companies. Leadership principles from Amazon and how to develop the right processes and mechanisms from IBM. From my startup, how to be really scrappy and to do things that 80/20 rule; not perfect, but good. Good for the customer, valuable for the customer, but not necessarily reaching that perfection mark. When Web3 started out, I was really interested in it. I’ve done some blockchain at Amazon Web Services and I was fascinated with the new technology. So I started doing all of these side projects on NFT, setting up my wallet, doing all this stuff on the side. It turned out that a company approached me called Unstoppable Domains. I was fascinated by what they were doing in the marketplace. They’re focused on digital identity and how, in the Web3 world, you take your identity with you. It's not linked with a particular application. I thought that was fascinating given my history. Looking at Web3, I was like, why would I keep doing these side projects when I could do this full time? So, I came on with Unstoppable. The founding team is great, the portfolio of products is really fascinating to me, and the partners are all the who's who of Web3. So, here I am and I'm having a blast. Web3 Centralization and DecentralizationCarolyn: You talked about several things that are a little baffling to me. First of all, Web3. I'm embarrassed to say that I really haven’t heard that term...
On The Record with Rayvn Manuel
Feb 23 2022
On The Record with Rayvn Manuel
American culture and history is meant to be shared, according to senior application developer at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, and Army veteran Rayvn Manuel. She talks with Carolyn and Mark about some of her goals in her work at the Smithsonian and the importance of sharing our stories and understanding our history. Episode Table of Contents[00:36] On the Record With an Army Veteran [09:18] A Change of Name on the Record [16:35] Growing up in a Lot of Racism Episode Links and Resources (Rayvn Manuel) (NMAAHC) (Renaissance Fair) On the Record With an Army VeteranCarolyn: We had the pleasure of speaking with (Rayvn Manuel) in November of last year. She’s a senior application developer at the National Museum of African American History and Culture and an army veteran. Following our regular recorded episode, Rayvn spoke to us about her opinion on some topics surrounding our history and culture in America. I went to the museum. When I got there, I felt a little bit like an intruder. It’s like I had no right to be there. Can you talk about that? Have you talked to other people who have felt that? Rayvn: Yes, I have. One of my really good friends, Chelsea, we were talking. I make costumes, and I make costumes for Renaissance Fair. Carolyn: I want to see pictures. Rayvn: I don't even let my kids see pictures of me in my costumes, but I love it. I was making her costume and she was just telling me how uncomfortable she feels. She's not African American, she's Caucasian American. She was telling me how she is confused about what to do because she has so much empathy for what's going on with Black Lives Matter. There are certain people in the African American community that will embrace people who are trying to understand. Then there are also other people who actually will make you feel like you feel, Carolyn. It’s like, you'll never understand so don't even try to understand. She's like, "Well, what do I do? So I don't want to come like I'm condescending and I don't want to feel like whatever." I think that what you do, part of that is guilt. A Big HeartRayvn: That you feel some sort of guilt for something that you had nothing or have anything to do with. You have a big heart and so much empathy that you just want to understand. Not only understand, because I don't think I could ever understand anyone that went through the Holocaust. I didn't feel like I didn't belong in that museum because it was an experience that I wanted to see. And I was in the army and I was stationed, actually, in Germany. I went to Dachau, and that is a place to get a better understanding of the culture, of the society. That culture and that society makes up our culture and our society, and we engage. I engage. In New York, I engaged with people who had grandparents that had to deal with things from the fallout from the Holocaust. I learned that my grandmother, this hurt me to my soul, this is why I became what's called woke. My grandmother told me that they were in North Carolina, her and my mom. My mom was little, and my uncle, they were not allowed to sit in the front of the bus. Up until that point I understood that that's what happened. I understood that from an educational perspective. When my grandmother told me about her and my mother, things changed. Mark: It became personal. Rayvn: Yes, I did. I couldn't because that's the generation before me. You can't feel that you don't belong. Because wherever your background is and where most of us are all mutts most of it, we're totally mixed. Carolyn: I'm a complete mutt. Your Background Is Your History on the RecordRayvn: I am, too. My father's side is Portuguese. Carolyn: Well, I feel like your eyes are green, aren't they? Rayvn: They're blue-ish, but they change colors depending on what I'm wearing....
Cybersecurity News Round Up with Willie Hicks
Feb 16 2022
Cybersecurity News Round Up with Willie Hicks
Willie Hicks, CTO of Public Sector at Dynatrace, joins Carolyn and Mark to discuss the top Cybersecurity news stories so far in 2022. Willie offers his expert opinion on the White House Executive Order on Improving the Digital Government Experience, the recent Log4j vulnerability, and the Pentagon's new Zero Trust office. Episode Table of Contents[00:43] Unpacking the Biggest Headlines in Cybersecurity News [08:21] Major Catastrophe [16:03] Cybersecurity News Highlights the Highest Level of Vulnerability [23:59] A Quantum Shift in Cybersecurity News Episode Links and Resources (Willie Hicks) (Executive Order) (Willie Hicks Article on Zero Trust) (Log4j) Unpacking the Biggest Headlines in Cybersecurity NewsCarolyn: Today we talked to (Willie Hicks), Dynatrace public sector CTO. He’ll unpack some of the biggest headlines of late from the Executive Order on Transforming Federal Customer Experience and Service Delivery to Log4j. I know Willie, you're so sick of this topic, but we're going to cover it anyway, and then Zero Trust Thunderdome Awards. I want to go first to the Executive Order requiring improving the digital government experience. Willie, will you give us the big takeaways from this Executive Order? What does it mean for our agencies? Willie: First of all, I think that the Executive Order on Transforming is transforming the federal customer experience. It is going to impact the agencies, but I also think it's going to impact the digital citizens of the day, the real customers of the federal government. I think President Biden reiterated this, it’s supposed to be a government for the people, by the people. We're trying to put people back into the equation. I think the big takeaway for me is that the federal government is coming back into or getting to a point where they're really understanding that customer experience, well, they already understood it. But they’re really starting to internalize and figure out how to make customer experience like the customer experience most citizens expect to see with anybody who shops on Amazon, anyone who does a Google search.A Fundamental Shift in Customer ExperienceWillie: They expect, with the push of a button, that they got all the groceries shipped to them the next day or the same day. That kind of experience you do not get with the federal government today. I think that we're seeing a fundamental shift now, not just that kind of digital experience, but I think across the board. Like when you even walk into a brick or a mortar building, when you interface on the phone with a government employee, I think we're going to start, hopefully, seeing more customer-focused, customer-centric type attitudes. This is really long overdue. I've been in this business for many years. I remember one of my early visits to a federal agency that will remain nameless, but I was speaking to this agency about what we call our digital user experience. How we need to focus on the real metric who's the end user. Right now, you are focused on the back end. You're focused on, is the server up or down? Is this process running? Do I have availability for this device? No one's actually really looking at the end user. So how do you know they are getting a good experience? Not only are the systems running, but are they running efficiently? Are they getting transactions back in a timely manner, or are they frustrated?I remember one engineer saying, "Well, why does that matter?" I'm like, "It does matter because they're your number one...
Unbelievable Lessons with Greg Crabb Former Chief Information Security Officer of the US Postal Service
Feb 9 2022
Unbelievable Lessons with Greg Crabb Former Chief Information Security Officer of the US Postal Service
What does it take to secure 160 million Americans privacy? Greg Crabb, former Chief Information Security Officer at US Postal Service joins Tech Transforms to talk about his experiences from his time as Projects Coordinator for International Fraud to his role in the 2020 US Presidential Election. Episode Table of Contents[00:42] Greg Crabb in the House, Founder of 10-8 Cyber [10:33] Good Guys Get Together With Greg Crabb [20:05] They Want To Do the Right Thing [29:32] Greg Crabb Had a Long, Deep, and Intense Service Episode Links and Resources (Greg Crabb) (USPS) (FBI) (Secret Service) (Europol) (Interpol) (AQAP) (CISA) (Ebay) (Chief of Police Conference) (Hurricane Electric) (LexisNexis) (Sergey Pavlovich) (James Woolsey) (Damitri Gluboph) (Orange Revolution) (Russian FSB) (Solar Winds) (Chris Krebbs) (Matt Heartman) (Amazon) (CAD) (Jen Limb) (Delivering Happiness) (Adam Grant) Greg Crabb in the House, Founder of 10-8 CyberCarolyn: Today, our guest is a rockstar. His background just blew me away. ( Greg Crabb), founder of 10-8 Cyber and strategic advisor to several organizations, but that doesn't even scratch the tip of the iceberg of who our guest is today. Greg: Thank you, Carolyn. I enjoy the opportunity to chat. Carolyn: You recently retired after 20 years with the US Postal Service where you wore many hats. From being a project coordinator for international fraud, assistant director of economic crimes, you ended your career as the chief information security officer and vice president of USPS. That's the very tip of the iceberg of your career. I want to kick it over to you and have you tell us your story. Greg: The mission of my life has been to protect others and drive benefits for society. I was grateful enough to have the opportunity to retire last year after 30 years of federal service. When I joined the postal service in the mid-90s, I spent the first several years of my career being an auditor. I was responsible for the old electronic data processing controls portion of the financial audit. There I learned an amazing amount of information about how computers work, mainframes, networking, and all that sort of thing. In 2000, I transitioned to spend seven years investigating the origins of Eastern European organized cyber crime. That was an amazing experience. I got the opportunity to really attack an organized crime group. It was based out of Ukraine and had splinters all over the world. I worked with Europol and Interpol, the Secret Service, the FBI, and many other organizations in between. Bigger and Better Things for Greg CrabbGreg: In about 2005, I moved to Washington to take on bigger and better things. Then in 2010, the international supply chain was attacked with some parcel bombs from AQAP. AQAP put PETN, it's the liquid explosive that we all know as why we can't carry water bottles onto airplanes. It completely changed the security model of how international supply chains...