Love in Action

Marcel Schwantes

Join host Marcel Schwantes and the world's top business thought-leaders, authors, executives, and leadership experts as they reimagine the conditions necessary for creating caring, humane, and human-centered workplaces that result in high-performing cultures and bottom-line impact. The future of leadership is "love in action." Join the movement!

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Marcel Schwantes: Vulnerability, an Important Virtue in Leadership
Yesterday
Marcel Schwantes: Vulnerability, an Important Virtue in Leadership
“Dr. Brown's viral Ted Talk, The Power of Vulnerability, has already solidified the importance of vulnerability in the workplace, and how critical it is for leaders to connect with and inspire others.” [00:45] Marcel shares Dr. Brene Brown’s philosophy on the virtue of Vulnerability as ‘the birthplace of innovation, creativity, and change.’“Employees and leaders who trust one another learn to be comfortable being open to one another around their failures, disappointments, weaknesses, even fears.” [1:25] Marcel explains that vulnerability-based trust is the backbone of successful leadership. “Courage sets vulnerability apart as a major strength of leadership.....so now it’s no longer weak, soft, and fuzzy.” [2:30] Sadly, many teams work together for years and still distrust one another, and others only together a short amount of time display an incredible amount of trust. Marcel drives home that the difference is having the courage to show up with emotional honesty, acceptance of shortcomings, release perfections, and have open dialogue.“Increase self-awareness, Lead from the heart, Listen to understand, Be ‘present’ with your feelings.” [3:52] How can you lead with more vulnerability? Marcel gives 4 big ideas and actions to practice becoming a model of vulnerability.  Mentioned in this episode:Marcel Schwantes | Professional Profile | LinkedInMarcel SchwantesThe Power of Vulnerability TED Talk
Marcel Schwantes: Vulnerability, an Important Virtue in Leadership
Yesterday
Marcel Schwantes: Vulnerability, an Important Virtue in Leadership
“Dr. Brown's viral Ted Talk, The Power of Vulnerability, has already solidified the importance of vulnerability in the workplace, and how critical it is for leaders to connect with and inspire others.” [00:45] Marcel shares Dr. Brene Brown’s philosophy on the virtue of Vulnerability as ‘the birthplace of innovation, creativity, and change.’“Employees and leaders who trust one another learn to be comfortable being open to one another around their failures, disappointments, weaknesses, even fears.” [1:25] Marcel explains that vulnerability-based trust is the backbone of successful leadership. “Courage sets vulnerability apart as a major strength of leadership.....so now it’s no longer weak, soft, and fuzzy.” [2:30] Sadly, many teams work together for years and still distrust one another, and others only together a short amount of time display an incredible amount of trust. Marcel drives home that the difference is having the courage to show up with emotional honesty, acceptance of shortcomings, release perfections, and have open dialogue.“Increase self-awareness, Lead from the heart, Listen to understand, Be ‘present’ with your feelings.” [3:52] How can you lead with more vulnerability? Marcel gives 4 big ideas and actions to practice becoming a model of vulnerability.  Mentioned in this episode:Marcel Schwantes | Professional Profile | LinkedInMarcel SchwantesThe Power of Vulnerability TED Talk
Marcel Schwantes: The Foundation for Effective Communication
Aug 11 2022
Marcel Schwantes: The Foundation for Effective Communication
Highlights:“When you focus on the needs of your employees, growing and empowering them, we can agree that this cannot be properly done without good listening skills.” [1:48] An often neglected, rarely mastered art form, Marcel explains that listening is the foundation of human communication. “Authentic listening is the ability to understand what's happening on the other side of the fence; to identify the will of a group and help to clarify that will if you’re a leader” [3:25] Marcel defines authentic listening as selfless, begging one overarching theme: how can I help the other person?  “If you place yourself in the position of listening to feedback for your own good, to further your development...I promise you things will change in a positive direction.” [5:40] Marcel relates to leaders in that it is hard to listen to feedback. But it is SO important for yourself and for your team.“Be open. Listen without interruption, objections, or defensiveness. Be responsive. Listen without turning the table. Ask questions for clarification. Be accountable. Seek to understand the effects and consequences of your behavior. Be self-aware. Be aware of your own emotional reactions, body language, and how you're coming across in the listening. Be quiet. Refrain from making or preparing to make a response, or trying to explain, defend, or fix. Just stay....quiet.” [6:05] If you're stuck feeling hesitant about feedback, Marcel provides 5 tips for setting yourself up to successfully receive feedback to your benefit.  Mentioned in this episode:Marcel Schwantes | Professional Profile | LinkedInMarcel SchwantesTalk, Inc.: How Trusted Leaders Use Conversation to Power their Organizations Hardcover – June 19, 2012 Leadership Is a Conversation
Jacqueline Carter: Compassionate Leadership
Aug 4 2022
Jacqueline Carter: Compassionate Leadership
Jacqueline Carter is a partner and North American Director for Potential Project, and the co-author of Compassionate Leader: How to do Hard Things in a Human Way.Highlights:“Not only is it possible to do hard things in a human way, but when we do…our people thrive.” [9:50] Jacqueline Carter dives into the data behind her new book Compassionate Leader, delighted to find this human way of doing the hard things that solves the leadership challenge of better well-being and better performance.“How does being rated high on compassion help with our stress and anxiety levels, which are off the charts?” [10:55] Marcel, taking note of the rising stress levels post pandemic, asks Jacqueline how compassionate leadership changes that…interestingly enough, it benefits both the leader and the staff. “There are many leaders that are smart…being smart means you have the answer to the question; being wise is knowing when not to give the answer to the question.” [13:40] Not only is compassion important but Jacqueline drives home the point of the importance of wisdom in that equation. A wise leader can bring together the greatest potential of the team.“Empathy can lead to empathetic burnout; we can care SO much that we can get stuck and then we can’t do anything.” [21:20] Don’t let empathy hijack your brain. Jacqueline encourages leaders to ask the question, how can I be of benefit…to drive and influence their ability to lead with compassion. “Compassionate action can be no action, so long as it is done with wisdom.” [23:31] Leading with compassion can sometimes mean taking a step back. Jacqueline explains the need for space in decisions and actions…at times doing nothing at all. “Before we lead others with compassion, we must first learn to lead ourselves with compassion.” [23:45] Marcel quotes Jacqueline’s principle of ‘Oxygen Mask First’: a critical point for leaders to meet their needs and take care of themselves first so they can then be of service to others. “Busyness does not equal productivity” [25:30] Jacqueline’s tip for leaders is to stop wearing busyness as a badge of honor and instead pause and approach tasks with a calmness and understanding of what is possible and reasonable to do. “Wouldn’t it be amazing if as a culture, we valued our downtime as a restorative opportunity for us to be able to show up as a better version of ourselves.” [28:00] What does it mean to appreciate the "busylessness"? Jacqueline encourages an emphasis on creating space in your life and mind for actual downtime, where you are present as an individual. “It takes an immense amount of courage to see vulnerability as a leadership strength and not as a weakness.” [32:45] Marcel comments on the principle of ‘Courage over Comfort’ in which Jacqueline explains the hard stuff, that requires courage and uncomfortability where leaders should embrace the fear and tame it.“We can both be hard and human. We can focus on results and care. Not only is that better for ourselves, for our people, but also for our business.” [36:55] Rounding out the discussion on the 6 principles, Jacqueline parts with what she hopes listeners and readers will take away from her book, Compassionate Leader.Resources:Potential ProjectJacqueline Carter - Senior Partner & North America Director - Potential Project | LinkedIn Harvard Business School Columbia Business School Berkeley HaasAmsterdam Business School
Jenn Lim: Beyond Happiness
Jul 28 2022
Jenn Lim: Beyond Happiness
Jenn Lim is the CEO of Delivering Happiness (DH), a company she and Tony Hsieh (the late CEO of Zappos.com) cofounded to create happier company cultures for a more profitable and sustainable approach to business. Highlights:“A big part of happiness is not just our highs but it’s also our lows…and I did not know that at the time I would be experiencing one of the biggest lows in my life.” [8:45] Jenn Lim reflects upon the loss of Tony Hsieh during the publishing of her book, Beyond Happiness.“I started doing really purposeful work on how you can create organizations with scientific happiness, positive psychology, and be profitable too.” [12:50] After a series of profound life events, Jenn experienced a shift where her work with Tony Hseih and Delivering Happiness began.“A sense of authentic self, pleasure and higher purpose are essentially the three elements of happiness.” [14:05] Jenn provides a brief definition of happiness and Marcel challenges the meaning of the book title, Beyond Happiness. Going beyond creates deeper conversation on the highs and lows, mental health, and “shadow sides”.“Did the pandemic affect how we were able to connect and relate to each other and raise our happiness? We are kind of post-pandemic now, but we’re never really past it. So how has that changed how we should look at happiness and business?” [18:27] Marcel brings a connection to the pandemic...the time in which Jenn was working on the book. Jenn comments on how we are seeing that shift in attention to happiness with the “Great Resignation”, what she refers to as a “Great Awakening”.“They realized their whole entire purpose, which was to ripple out impact and happiness, to their customers and community.” [23:30] Mountain View Egypt is a client of Delivering Happiness, Jenn shares their journey in and outcome in shifting their practices surrounding culture and happiness in their business. “If you think about these different levels of happiness all of us as leaders can embed these things in our systems and know that if we give people more autonomy; we give people more sense of progress and connectedness and a higher purpose that they align to their personal purpose. That’s where the magic happens. ” [27:00] What can leaders do to improve happiness in their organization? Jenn discusses the impact that can happen. “It’s great to have a mission statement on the wall, but what does it actually mean?” [29:00] Jenn challenges leaders to hone and develop their purpose and how they are embedding these practices of happiness by attaching meaning and value to their people’s work. Mentioned in this episode:Jenn LimBeyond Happiness: Inside the BookJenn Lim - Emeryville, California, United States | Professional Profile | LinkedIn Mountain View
Donato Tramuto: The Double Bottom Line
Jul 14 2022
Donato Tramuto: The Double Bottom Line
Donato J. Tramuto is a global health activist and founder of the Tramuto Foundation and Health eVillages. He is the author of The Double Bottom Line: How compassionate leaders captivate hearts and deliver results.Highlights:“Compassionate leadership is empathy in action.” [11:28] Donato J. Tramuto gets started by breaking down the definition of compassion. It’s no longer enough to just say ‘I feel your pain’, you have to put something into action. “When you lack empathy, you lose your ability to adapt your approach because you can’t see further than your own point of you.” [12:13] Donato points out the problems created by not using empathy in leadership and in your everyday perspective.“84% of the workers surveyed believed that a compassionate workplace encourages cooperation, which leads to greater productivity and profitability.” [14:50] Marcel gets into the research with Donato. Why is compassionate leadership important and it is really making an impact in the workplace?“The double bottom line says it doesn’t have to be an OR it should be an AND. You can be profitable AND you can insert a soul into the company.” [17:00] What does the title of Donato’s book actually mean? Anyone in business knows the bottom line, but Donato uses this common phrase to infuse profit AND compassion. “Start off with Tenderness…then you can be tenacious. Too many leaders start off with tenacity and then they have to pick up the mess and they’ve lost the trust.” [18:10] This is the concept of the “Three T’s”, Donato’s model for embedding compassion into management while building trust but being firm.“One of the components of compassionate leadership is your willingness to be vulnerable and your willingness to self-reflect every day.” [23:00] We have got to walk the talk and lead by example. Donato believes when we hurt people it is unintentional, but how are you reflecting on that and making it right?“We have to listen to understand, not listen to react.” [26:45] Donato rebuts the “Great Resignation” as a time of “Great Reflection”. People want to be heard and they want more than just a paycheck, they want community. Leaders need to listen to understand these employees.“We have got to get back to leading with the heart. Leading with passion. Leading by caring for your employees.” [29:55] What are these key components of compassionate leadership? Donato encourages leaders to put authenticity and vulnerability into how they lead because employees do not leave their values at the door when they begin their workday.  “When you create a diverse workforce, you are sending the message that you care about the notion that we are going to live by example to embrace everyone.” [32:00] Donato confirms for Marcel that Compassion = Diversity. A compassionate workplace begins with an intentionally diverse and supported workforce. Resources:Donato Tramuto
Julie Winkle Giulioni: Promotions Are So Yesterday
Jul 7 2022
Julie Winkle Giulioni: Promotions Are So Yesterday
Julie is the co-author of the international bestseller, Help Them Grow or Watch Them Go, translated into seven languages, and Promotions Are So Yesterday: Redefine Career Development. Help Employees Thrive. She leads DesignArounds, a firm that creates and offers training to organizations worldwide.Highlights:“My story has this through line of learning and development…that throughline is helping people to grow.” [10:25] Julie Giulioni shares her story and her passion for working with people on growth and development, both in the workplace and outside of work.“It really does feel like Promotions Are So Yesterday, is the sequel [to my previous book] because as you know, Help the Grow really focused on the conversation, ‘how can we disarm this whole thing called career development?’.” [12:50] Before diving into her new book, Julie reiterates the message behind her first book and what that means to her research. “The climb is listed as well as your other 7 discoveries for these new alternative ways people want to grow and develop.” [17:35] Marcel and Julie touch on the 7 dimensions of development in the book: Contribution, Competence, Confidence, Connection, Challenge, Contentment, and Choice.“We found that contribution across ages, genders, levels - that was number one.” [23:30] Julie discusses the really positive meaning behind the number one dimension, Contribution, as a top need for people in the workplace. A surprising yet comforting bottom dimension? The climb of the corporate ladder. “This whole conversation around choice is really alive for a lot of employees, managers, and organizations, alike, as we try to figure out where does that decision-making lie.” [30:55] Julie explains how the ranking around choice fluctuates and has changed heavily based on COVID related shifts in the workplace.“A facilitative mindset acknowledges there is wisdom, there are insights, there are brilliant ideas inside each person just waiting to find expression” [35:25] Julie outlines how leaders can act as a facilitator by asking great questions and at the same time cultivating a silence for a safe playing field for employees to share their contributions.“With people being so busy these days, adding one more thing, to their list, to their brains….it’s gotta be really high value” [44:20] Intrinsic motivation and desire is key for employees and adding to their competence. Julie stresses that leaders and employers putting together plans need to be real in consideration of what is truly possible.“The work becomes the development, the development becomes the work.” [47:14] Marcel sums up the movement in which employees are shaping their work and the way leaders can seamlessly embed this intention of learning in any job.Resources:Julie Winkle GiulioniAssessment - Julie Winkle GiulioniJulie Winkle Giulioni, Author - Home | FacebookJulie Winkle Giulioni - LinkedIn
Dorie Clark: The Long Game
Jun 30 2022
Dorie Clark: The Long Game
Dorie Clark is a consultant and keynote speaker who teaches executive education at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and Columbia University's Graduate School of Business. She has been named one of the top fifty business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50 and the #1 Communication Coach in the world by the Marshall Goldsmith Leading Global Coaches Awards. Clark is a frequent contributor to Harvard Business Review and is the author of Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out. Her books have been translated into eleven languages. Highlights:“Really what I focus my work on is helping people and helping companies, figure out in the very crowded marketplace, how they can get their best ideas heard.” [7:20] Dorie Clark introduces the inspiration behind her work and her book, The Long Game.“During COVID, it’s almost like forget the long term game, everybody’s all of a sudden in reactionary mode. How do we pivot!?” [10:05] Marcel comments on the broad shift in short term versus long term thinking due to COVID-19 and changes necessary from the pandemic shutdown.“We’re forced into doing long term thinking, if there are specific goals we want to attain.” [14:10] Why is long term thinking so hard? Dorie shares a quote she included in her book as she explains the motivation and pain points surrounding long term thinking. “Why is it that we can’t stop this relentless, short term, crazy busy, ‘FOMO’. ‘I can’t measure myself up to the standards of these celebrities’ that causes a lot of anxiety for me, and unrealistic expectations. We just get busier, and busier, and busier. So how do we stop this pursuit?” [16:00] Marcel questions why we as a culture feel the need to be unrealistically busy.“I threw myself into work, as a way of just distracting myself. The way that I think about it is like how they put patients into a medically induced coma so that their body can heal, because if they were awake they just couldn’t take it. So work can be like your medically induced coma.” [21:12] Dorie shares a personal experience in her reasoning for throwing herself into work and staying busy. Making the comparison to overworking as a “medically induced coma”.“All the forces are going to be mitigating against it. Because it's always more convenient for other people if you say yes to them. So nobody is going to help you with this.” [23:48] It’s easy and sometimes the right thing to say yes often when you’re early on in your career. But Dorie stresses that at a pivotal point in your business you have to start farming the things that are already working and no longer hoping that every small opportunity might turn into something. “So one of the ways that we can really focus on the long term, is having a clear, defining...North Star.” [26:51] Marcel asks Dorie to elaborate on what it means to find your North Star, the idea of reinventing yourself or instead remaining stagnant.“The strength that we have as professionals, and the thing that actually makes us valuable, is understanding that different things, different skills, are called for at different times. And you have to be smart enough to understand when and how to apply those skills. ”[31:20] Dorie explains the 4 career waves in her book: Learning, Creating, Connecting and Reaping.Resources:Download the free Long Game Strategic Thinking Self-AssessmentDorie Clark Dorie Clark - Top 50 Business Thinker in the World - Thinkers50 | LinkedIn
Christine Porath: MASTERING COMMUNITY
Jun 23 2022
Christine Porath: MASTERING COMMUNITY
Guest Bio:Christine Porath is a tenured professor at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business. She’s the author of Mastering Civility and co-author of The Cost of Bad Behavior. She is also a consultant working with leading organizations to help people and communities thrive. Her speaking and consulting clients include Google, United Nations, World Bank, Microsoft, Genentech, Marriott, 3M, Verizon, Ford, World Health Organization, and Cleveland Clinic.Highlights“What are the costs of these small interactions between people, that can make them feel disrespected or small?” [6:44] Christine Porath asks the big question that makes up research on the need for community in the workplace.“I stepped out of the shower and my back went out...I could not move, and it ended up being that the stress was exacerbated by toxic management. This fear based, intense pressure cooker that put unrealistic expectations on me.” [7:29] Marcel shares a story from his personal past and how toxic management caused physical injury due to stress. “We looked at witnesses, and it was taking them off track just as much. Their performance was declining by about 33%.” [16:42] When discussing the consequences in her research, Christine shares some statistics on productivity all the way down to the witnesses of negative interactions beyond those directly involved.“Nearly 50% said because they would be at a disadvantage if they were civil or respectful at work. They thought they would be less leader like.” [18:14] Christine shares some interesting insights on the reason behind rude or negative behavior in the workplace. “I’m really curious, on what you saw as maybe one or two of the worst examples of incivility in the research.” [20:46] Marcel, intrigued by Christine's research in negative behavior in the workplace, lines up space for Christine to share some examples involving public belittling of employees during meetings.“74% of people are actually more engaged, 81% are more likely to stay with the company…83% reported higher thriving at work and a sense of being more energized, alive, and growing.” [24:14] Marcel lists some eye-opening stats on the positive impact of a strong community at work. Christine comments on the difference it would make for employees to prioritize working in an environment with a sense of community.“Everyday they would meet in this film room, and it wouldn’t be about the X’s and O’s, the strategies, the game. It was this idea of sharing information, and being vulnerable, and talking about things that mattered.”[31:10] Christine explains an example of Uniting People, with a story of coach Phil Jackson and the Chicago Bulls. “It’s these moments, that if you're mindful which is hard these days, can really make a difference to people.” [38:49] Christine talks about the impact of small moments in acknowledging and respecting people, like with her story of Empathy at Cleveland Clinic.“Given how important culture is whether you’re PTA, or a school, or a local organization, we should prioritize culture and think about how do we continue to strive to get better?” [43:01] Sharing about Boosting Wellness, Christine gives examples of small but impactful ways to improve culture in the workplace.“There’s community in so many ways, but people don’t think about community in a work sense.” [49:00] Closing out today’s episode, Marcel connects community as an important extension of love in the workplace. Resources:Christine PorathChristine Porath (@PorathC) / TwitterChristine Porath - Professor of Management - Georgetown University | LinkedIn Mastering Community: The Surprising Ways Coming Together Moves Us from Surviving to Thriving
Ryan Jenkins: Connectable
Jun 16 2022
Ryan Jenkins: Connectable
The authors of Connectable, Ryan Jenkins, CSP, and Steven Van Cohen, MSOD, are founders of LessLonely.com, the world’s #1 resource for addressing workplace loneliness and creating more belonging at work. Collectively they have over 20 years of experience helping organizations like FedEx, Coca-Cola, The Home Depot, Salesforce, Wells Fargo, State Farm, John Deere, and Delta Air Lines improve their teams. Their work has been featured in Fast Company, Forbes, Wall Street Journal, SUCCESS, Inc., and Entrepreneur Magazine. When they are not writing and speaking, you can find them sampling craft beers, attempting to play golf together, and spending quality time with their respective families. Stay connected with them on social media @RyanAndSteven.Highlights:“One of our primary goals is to destigmatize loneliness, and to make it much more accessible because it’s a universal human condition and we all experience it. So it shouldn’t be shameful, it's simply a signal.” [8:10] Ryan explains the stigma of loneliness and how he and his co-author, Steven Van Cohen, want to help.“Let’s bring the book front and center; Connectable, what’s the big idea behind it? It's not just a book about loneliness…is it?” [11:52] Marcel introduces Ryan’s book, ready to dive deep about the meaning of loneliness in the workplace. “Work is the most fertile ground to lessen loneliness because there is routine, and there’s meaningful relationships that can occur, there’s purpose, there’s learning. There’s all these loneliness lifelines that we can all grasp onto.” [12:22] Ryan shares the thinking behind his book why connection is important and how work can make the difference.“This is so real for people that are listening, they understand ‘oh this is happening right now’....let’s start with the why…why are so many workers suffering right now from loneliness?’ [15:00] As Marcel relates the rising loneliness rates to his audience, Ryan explains the big ticket reasons as busyness and social media!“Loneliness was an epidemic pre COVID, and then COVID comes along…BAM...now we’re in crisis, there is an increase in loneliness and isolation. People go remote for the first time, they don’t know how to manage…that work life blend.” [18:30] Acknowledging the escalation of loneliness caused by the pandemic and the increase of remote work, Marcel challenges how to engage isolated workers. “If we experience loneliness our reaction should be to reach out and connect with others but what happens is we turn inward and it just creates this downward spiral where we isolate further.” [26:46] In Connectable, Ryan and his co-author share 10 ways to identify signals of loneliness, here he shares a few ways to see this in your co-workers or friends. “Even as an introvert, you still need to connect as well. It is in your human design to do that.” [32:50] Marcel recognizes that there are some personality types that may be assumed to prefer less connection, but still genuinely benefit from interaction.“Leaders at any level of the organization, one of the best ways is to communicate clearly. Make sure everyone knows what's going on: What we’re doing in the organization, why we’re doing things in the organization. For every leader, they should make sure that people know how they’re fitting into that bigger picture.” [43:30] What can leader’s do to create belonging in the work environment? Ryan shares some closing advice for leaders to foster connection in their organizations. Resources:Less Lonely Connectable: How Leaders Can Move Teams From Isolated to All In
G. Richard Shell: The Conscience Code
Jun 9 2022
G. Richard Shell: The Conscience Code
G. Richard Shell is a global thought leader and senior faculty member at one of the world’s leading business schools, the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. His forthcoming book, The Conscience Code: Lead with Your Values. Advance Your Career, addresses an increasingly urgent problem in today’s workplace: standing up for core values such as honesty, fairness, personal dignity, and justice when the pressure is on to look the other way.Highlights:“Nobody has prepared these people that are in career transitions. This is becoming an increasing problem in professional life.” [2:46] Marcel leads into the discussion surrounding big asks in the professional world that go against morals and conscience. “Most people perceive value based moral conflicts at work as career OR conscience. This book and my work is to show how we can have career AND conscience...I’m trying to help people learn how to stand and fight.” [11:27] Richard explains the reasoning and need behind his teaching and his book.“Why do scandals keep happening? Regardless of what generation you grow in, it’s almost like we expect it to happen.” [17:27] Marcel comments on how moral conflicts are challenged in a very common way. “This is the secret of why it happens...they can access a face-saving rationalization for doing it and the rationalization the mind is trying to promote on interest, the greedy part of our minds. It’s like a mechanism and depending on how much power you have, you can draw others in.” [18:10] Richard talks about the motivation that creates conflict are values in the professional world.“In the end, moral injury is what creates burn out. When you’re sliced and diced enough at work that you no longer recognize yourself as a moral person. So it really is a matter of protecting yourself.” [27:31] Richards gives a profound statement surrounding moral injury, supporting the need to face conflict and make changes. “What role does our personality play in ethical conflict? Because we’re all different.” [31:45] Marcel comments on how an individual's personality & values affect how they respond to conflict.“So personality in terms of how you process conflict, and some people over-do it, it’s not just under doing it. Self-awareness in terms of how you manage conflict is a really important starter in becoming effective. I’m trying to help people think not conscience or career but career AND conscience.” [33:16] Richard knows that everyone responds differently to conflict but the ultimate goal is to choose career and conscience.“Don’t be a loan ranger. You’ve got to bring in people that share your values with you, that will help you stand up to things that are going on that are unethical.” [34:47] Marcel points out to involve allies to help you stand up to conflict and provide support.“The template, I borrow from the fighter pilot strategy book, it’s called the OODA Loop and the letter stands for first Observe, and that’s face the conflict. Second O - own it, make it your responsibility. Third, Decide, survey the options. Then A is Act… and then start the loop again.” [36:10] Richard explains his simple template for helping his students make the plan to tackle these moral conflicts. “The last rule that I’m gonna jump right to is rule number ten, and that’s ‘Choose to Lead’ and it seems appropriate to me because everything rises and falls on leadership. This is how you end your book, so when we choose to lead with our values, lead with courage, you’re saying we advance our career and achieve success?” [39:25] Marcel gets Richard to explain the importance of leadership.Resources:The Conscience Code: Lead with Your Values. Advance Your Career. Richard Shell - LinkedInG. Richard ShellConflict Styles AssessmentWorkStep
Dan Johnston: WorkStep
Jun 2 2022
Dan Johnston: WorkStep
This episode is proudly sponsored by WorkStep. WorkStep makes the supply chain a better place to work. WorkStep’s leading software empowers companies to hire and retain their hourly workforce for the long run, while improving outcomes for critical frontline workers. For more information on WorkStep, visit www.workstep.com***Dan Johnston is the co-founder and CEO of WorkStep. He’s worked with some of the largest companies in the world to help them transform their approach to workforce management with cutting-edge technology.Highlights“The shortage of these frontline workers is a real thing and it’s reached critical mass.” [2:27] Marcel opens by discussing how important frontline workers are – and why today’s conversation is more relevant than ever.“At WorkStep, we help large companies better hire and, most critically, retain the frontline workforce across their supply chain. We empower companies with software that helps them source better fit hires and help them understand why their employees are leaving, what they can do about it, and how they can measure the impact of those initiatives… It’s a win for both sides,” [9:51] says Dan, discussing the role of his company WorkStep.“The top driver of turnover is career growth. Those employees who don’t feel like their company is investing in them in the same way they are investing in the company, who don’t feel there are opportunities to grow their skills, grow their wages, and grow their careers within an organization, are the employees who are most likely to quit. Those workers who are most aligned to that growth pathway are most likely to stay,” [13:25] Dan says. According to WorkStep research, the desire for career growth is the number one driver of employee turnover.“What’s interesting about those findings is that the pay is important now, but it wasn’t the top factor.”[16:09] Marcel points out that pay, while important, isn’t the leading cause of turnover.“What tends to drive people to quit is when things are different than what they expected.”[18:33] Dan remarks that problems arise when employees encounter unforeseen issues in new roles. “Especially when we’re talking about the frontline industries, with very high turnover, that new hire period is going to be very critical. Many organizations lose half of their new employees during those first 90 days.” [28:55] Dan points this out to discuss how leaders should focus on the new hire period. “Whether you buy from WorkStep or not, ensure that you’re listening to the voice of your frontline associates, analyzing what they’re saying objectively (and ideally, in real-time), and acting on the true drivers of turnover.”[34:40] Dan recognizes that this is the singular strategy for fighting turnover. “We want our workers to succeed, even to the extent that we may lose them to a competitor. But while they’re under our care, we’re gonna do whatever it takes to empower the heck out of them. It makes business sense because if we are empowering them, and loving them well, and caring for their needs, of course, there’s gonna be a higher return on their energy and of course productivity,” [37:20] Marcel says, pointing to the importance of nurturing talent.“You can save money on turnover… But it’s also the right thing to do. You, as a leader, have the opportunity to do something that improves the job (and therefore the life) of thousands, tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of workers.” [42:00] Dan ends with some important info – fighting turnover is a good business decision, and an ethical one too. ResourcesMarcel Schwantes: www.Marcelschwantes.comInc. article: RETAIN: Dan: dan@workstep.com
Tim Elmore: The Eight Paradoxes of Great Leadership
May 26 2022
Tim Elmore: The Eight Paradoxes of Great Leadership
Dr. Tim Elmore is the founder and CEO of Growing Leaders, an Atlanta-based nonprofit organization created to develop emerging leaders. Since founding Growing Leaders, Elmore has spoken to more than 500,000 students, faculty, and staff on hundreds of campuses across the country. Elmore has also provided leadership training and resources for multiple athletic programs, including the University of Texas, the University of Miami, the University of Alabama, The Ohio State University, and the Kansas City Royals Baseball team. Tim's expertise on emerging generations and generational diversity in the workplace has led to media coverage in The Wall Street Journal, Forbes.com, and more. Highlights:“I needed to develop off-the-platform charisma.” [6:20] Tim shared a story of one of his first criticisms and pointed to the importance of being authentic and ‘on’ all of the time.“When we are on a platform speaking to a group of people, as the leader, if we will pull back the curtain and share a window to our own soul – maybe even our own struggle – we provide a mirror for them to see their own. We give them a window, they see a mirror.”[9:35] Tim discussed the importance of letting people see the authentic, true you. In a world of alpha males, some may mistake this openness for weakness. But when you allow people to see your genuine self, they feel inspired. They see themselves, and can improve their own lives.“Great leaders are both confident and humble,” [14:25] Tim says. This is one of the paradoxes of leadership. How can we balance both confidence and humility? Tim shares a story about Disney that shows exactly how it’s done.“Confidence makes our leadership believable but humility makes our confidence believable” [15:30] This quote from Tim really spoke volumes. When leading, you need confidence – but your team also needs to buy into your vision. Carrying yourself with humility is the way to make that happen.“I want to speak like I believe I’m right and listen as if I believe I’m wrong.” [25:00] Tim says he’s currently working on this one, and discusses it along with other leadership paradoxes.“We have to kind of lean on our employees and relinquish the control and the idea that ‘I have all the answers and I’m smarter’, because there might be smarter people in the room,” [27:30] Marcel pointed out, discussing the importance of recognizing your own weaknesses.“I’m challenging you to be a follower while being a leader… I think I’ve identified in all my team members what they do better than me.” [28:50] Tim went on to expound on this point – it’s critical that we empower people to do what they do best.“Feeling heard is so close to feeling loved that it’s almost indistinguishable.” [45:30] Tim talked about the importance of feeling heard in an organization.[48:35] Context, Application, and Belief. We ended on the importance of these three things. Those three things are what everyone needs, and can be described by another term, too: Love in Action.Resources:Marcel Schwantes: www.Marcelschwantes.comTim Elmore: www.timelmore.comGrowing Leaders: www.growingleaders.comTim Elmore on Facebook: Elmore on Twitter: Elmore on LinkedIn:
Anthony Pacilio: CAI Neurodiverse Solutions
May 19 2022
Anthony Pacilio: CAI Neurodiverse Solutions
Today’s show is proudly sponsored by CAI Neurodiverse Solutions. Are you prepared for the rising demand for neurodiverse talent? As the need for highly-skilled, top talent grows exponentially across most industries, CAI Neurodiverse Solutions recruits, assesses, and manages neurodivergent individuals, while creating rewarding, long-lasting careers. For more information, contact: CAINeurodiverseSolutions@cai.io.Anthony Pacilio is an expert in neurodiverse employment and currently serves as the vice president of CAI Neurodiverse Solutions. There, he helps neurodiverse candidates find roles, as well as helps businesses maintain best practices when working with neurodiverse employees. In the past, Anthony has worked in the finance and healthcare industries with similar missions. Highlights:“You’re getting a set of individuals who have different thinking patterns, who recognize different processes, and can actually broaden companies’ returns on investment.” [11:45] Anthony tells us how hiring neurodiverse candidates can actually make your organization more money.“It’s not just finding an individual to put in a job. It’s making sure the individual we are putting in that job is going to have support systems, is gonna have mentors, is gonna have everything they need to be successful.” [12:53] Anthony described the CAI’s strategy and how it’s about more than simply putting people in jobs.“Neurodiversity in the workplace is building a program that takes individuals that have these extremely valuable skillsets and putting them in a place where they’re able to succeed, but also be able to give a return on investment. And that’s the business case. We’re not doing this for charity. This is a business case.” [18:07]The first step to hiring more neurodiverse candidates? “The first shift we need to experience is a shift of the mind. It’s a mindset to want to be more curious, rather than make your general assumptions and lean on that bias that says ‘no they’re not going to be right for our organization.” [21:30]“A neurodivergent employee has unique strengths in areas that we may not even be aware of. It behooves every leader to pull that out of that person, so that they can make an impact for the organization.” [28:55]“Everybody thinks that support mechanisms are costly, that they’re thousands of dollars, and I can tell you that they’re not.” [38:03] Anthony talked about how accommodating neurodiverse people isn’t as difficult as some people think.Anthony shared a poignant story about how families react to CAI’s work. “Parents are always worried about their children – what’s gonna happen after they’re gone, if they didn’t have their independence? Well, not anymore. ” [43:00]“When you’re speaking of what we’re trying to do and leading by example in this particular space… you’re missing a whole lot of opportunity if you haven't developed empathy.” [47:02]ResourcesEmail CAI Neurodiverse SolutionsCAI Neurodiverse SolutionsNeurodiversity Career Connector
Gene Boes: Northwest Center
May 12 2022
Gene Boes: Northwest Center
Gene Boes is President and CEO of Northwest Center, where he has served since 2018. Northwest Center works to promote DE&I: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. Started in 1965, the Northwest Center has spent over 50 years serving children and adults with disabilities. Prior to his work with Northwest Center, Gene had an impressive and successful career. He worked in consulting and leadership roles for Loft9, Microsoft, Deloitte, as well as serving in the US Navy and holding an adjunct professorship at Seattle Pacific University and Seattle University.Visit Northwest Center to learn more about their services.Highlights:As Gene says, “Until everyone is allowed to engage and contribute, none of us reach our potential.” [7:30] That’s the mission and the core belief of the Northwest Center. The organization works for full inclusivity because that’s ultimately how everyone succeeds. “The four founding mothers continue to impact every zip code in the United States.” [9:50] Gene told a great story about the founding of the Northwest Center, and how the organization got nationwide legislation passed. “The truth of it is disability is not always visible.” [11:45] The fact is, we need to examine our definition of disability. It’s important that we understand disabilities aren’t always clear to the naked eye. Gene talked a little bit about this and how crucial it is. “People with disability are not broken. They don’t need to be fixed.” [12:20] quote for the thing“There’s an obstacle. There’s a challenge that they have to overcome to live successfully through everyday life. But the truth is we, the abled, put those obstacles in place and it’s really our responsibility to take those obstacles away through accommodation and being more thoughtful.” [12:26]“A lot of effort with Northwest Center is around education.” [17:30] The Northwest Center knows that education fuels change. So, they practice constant outreach to improve the lives of DE&I people around the nation. “Disability hiring is good for business. Don’t do this because it’s socially responsible. Certainly don’t think of it as charity – it’s not.” [21:28] Gene told me how disability hiring can benefit businesses. All too often, business owners think of hiring DE&I people as just a ‘good deed.’ That’s the wrong way to look at things. “It’s an enormous business benefit to be inclusive, but it’s not easy.” [31:20] Ultimately, hiring DE&I is hugely beneficial for a variety of reasons. But that doesn’t mean it’s simple – Gene tells me why. “At Northwest Center, we have nearly 1,000 employees. I work for 1,000 people. They don’t work for me, I work for them. So when you think about having the biggest impact as a leader, I think listening is an incredibly important trait.” [42:17]“To lead with practical love day in and day out is to remind yourself at the start of every day what you’re there for: to lift other people up.” [43:35] We ended with Gene’s thoughts on practical love and love in action. These were some tremendously insightful words on the importance of carrying love with you during your workday. Resources:Inc. article mentioned: Center on Facebook:  Northwest Center on LinkedIn:  Northwest Center on YouTube:
THE EARNED LIFE with Dr. Marshall Goldsmith
May 5 2022
THE EARNED LIFE with Dr. Marshall Goldsmith
Dr. Marshall Goldsmith is a New York Times #1 bestselling author, having sold over 2.5 million copies of his works worldwide. His books “Triggers” and “What Got You Here Won’t Get You There” were recently recognized on Amazon’s list of the ‘100 Best Leadership & Success Books Ever Written.’ He’s also won the Harvard Institute of Coaching’s Lifetime Award for Leadership. Highlights:“So if you’ve ever been caught in a cycle of regret... and I think that’s most of us....Marshall is here to tell us how to remove the obstacles that prevent us from creating our own fulfilling lives. And who better to help us remove those obstacles than the #1 ranked executive coach in the world.“ [2:25] Dr. Marshall Goldsmith is an expert in building a fulfilling life. He joined us on the podcast to have this all-too-important conversation. “A lot of my life is just great mentors.”[4:30] Marshall took us through his story – how he got to where he is today, and what he learned along the way. It’s a true rags-to-riches story. Marshall talks about how his book impacts already-successful people – and what that has taught him about life. “Part of the problem with goal achievement is that you can forget your aspiration” [9:00] As Marshall says, achieving goals is important, but it’s critical not to overvalue these goals. If you stumble into that pitfall, you’ll find that: “You can forget to enjoy the process of life.” [9:11]“Never become attached to achievement. Never become attached to results. It’s a fools’ game for two reasons. One is, you don’t have total control over the results. Two is, let’s say you achieve the results. How much satisfaction does that bring?” [11:45] “An earned life makes only a few demands of us.” [16:29] Marshall points to the importance of living your own life – not living through social media or the internet. Marshall discusses “the every breath paradigm.” [20:07] As a practicing Buddhist, Marshall holds the ‘every breath paradigm’ at the core of his day-to-day life. Every time you wake up, you get a fresh start. Life isn’t just a series of successes, but you constantly get chances to start over and turn over a new leaf. Marshall and I agree: “We choose to become who we want, rather than holding on to our past.” [25:35]At the end of the day, Marshall’s self-proclaimed mission is simple. “My bigger mission is to help people before I die and after I die.” [36:42] We ended with some really profound advice from Marshall. “We’re going through hard times and it’s important to have a support group.” [40:10] The past couple years have been tough on all of us. So it’s critical to have a support system around you for times like these. Resources:Marshall Goldsmith: www.marshallgoldsmith.com
Dr. Nathan Long: Saybrook University
Apr 28 2022
Dr. Nathan Long: Saybrook University
Dr. Nathan Long is the president of Saybrook University. With 25 years of experience in higher education, Dr. Long oversees all strategic and operational aspects of the university. He holds a Doctorate and Masters of Education in interdisciplinary studies.Saybrook University is an online, private, non-profit graduate university and the premier institution for humanistic scholarship and practice. Founded by luminary psychologists, for 50 years, Saybrook has offered advanced degrees, currently offering programs in psychology, integrative medicine and health sciences, business administration, counseling, and transformative social change. The institution is committed to helping students develop as whole individuals– mind, body, and spirit – and to relentlessly pursuing a more socially just and sustainable world. With low residency requirements for master’s and doctoral degrees, students can earn an online graduate degree and meet their personal and professional needs as adult learners servicing their communities.Highlights:“We are a humanistically focused institution of higher learning with an emphasis on social justice and sustainability.” [10:55] Dr. Long talked a bit about Saybrook’s mission and how the university uses love to support its students and alumni. This all stems from a desire to help, and you can hear the passion in Dr. Long’s voice. “The humanistic psychologist is not saying ‘here’s what I’m going to do to fix you’.” [17:23] We discussed humanistic psychology and how Saybrook puts that methodology at the core of its operations. According to the humanistic approach, the therapist doesn’t just label the patient and try to change them. Instead, the therapist and the individual are on a journey together. Each person is different, so applying labels isn’t entirely helpful.According to Dr. Long, the principles of humanistic psychology thread through almost every other discipline. Alumni can take lessons learned from Saybrook into virtually any career they choose. Dr. Long went on to discuss a few alumni success stories. He talked about how Saybrook’s humanistic ideas and philosophy can be applied to executive and leadership success. As Dr. Long says: “We’re not here to judge you.” Saybrook teaches that the therapist’s mission is to help the individual, not judge them. Leaders and therapists alike should identify what a person wants out of life, rather than label them with a disorder or diagnosis. We talked a little bit about leadership, and Dr. Long made the point that “if you’re not present, you’re going to be less effective as a leader.” [32:33] One of the top qualities of being an effective leader is simply being present. Dr. Long also stressed the importance of being “open to the journey, the possibility, and the prospects.” [36:28] It’s critical to approach situations or leadership roles with an open mind.  “I lead with love… by celebrating our team here at Saybrook.” [37:45] We finished with these words by Dr. Long. He talked about how he puts love in action at Saybrook. Resources:Saybrook University:
Stephen M. R. Covey: Trust & Inspire
Apr 21 2022
Stephen M. R. Covey: Trust & Inspire
Best-selling author Stephen M. R. Covey is the former president and CEO of The Covey Leadership Center, where he increased shareholder value by 67 times. Through his methods, he led The Covey Leadership Center to be the #1 leadership group in the world. He’s a Harvard MBA, who founded and currently leads Franklin Covey’s global speed of trust practice.“I saw firsthand the high cost of low trust,” [7:40] says Stephen. He points out the toxicity of a low-trust environment from his own personal experience: “We became aware that we need to build trust with each other intentionally.” [8:00]“Trust matters. It impacts everything.” [9:50] As Stephen says, trust is a performance multiplier and a leadership creator. It impacts organizations at virtually every level, creating benefits big, small, and everywhere in between. “My work on trust is ten times better because I also experienced the negative side. I experienced what it was like to not be trusted and to have a low-trust culture,” [12:05] Stephen says. His book isn’t just based on theory: Stephen has experienced low-trust work environments, and he’s seen firsthand how that quality can cripple an organization. “The world has changed but our style of leadership has not.” [13:03] One of the man great insights that Stephen provides is the world’s need for a new style of leadership.“This is not just a book on trust. This is a book on a new kind of leadership that is needed to succeed in our world today.” [14:41] It’s important to remember that Stephen’s book isn’t just about the idea of trust, or even the idea of trust in the workplace. The book can be applied to every aspect of your life. Stephen emphasizes the importance of elevating caring above competing. In business, it’s easy to fall into the trap of scarcity. But Stephen believes in an abundance mentality, and discusses how this can create trust in an organization. Stephen pointed to Satya Nadella as an example of a trust hero. He describes how Nadella changed Microsoft from a company on the decline to an innovative leader in their industry. “We need to become more trusting in our world, not less,” [37:45] says Stephen. There are a lot of doubters, saying that there’s too much risk in trusting. But Stephen always concludes that we need more trust, and that there’s some risk involved in trusting people, but there’s more risk in not trusting people.ResourcesFrom Boss to Leader: and Inspire Book: www.trustandinspire.comStephen on LinkedIn: on Twitter: ​​
Leading with Love and Laughter with Zina Sutch and Patrick Malone
Apr 14 2022
Leading with Love and Laughter with Zina Sutch and Patrick Malone
When it comes to using love in the workplace, our guests on this podcast literally wrote the book. Zina Sutch and Patrick Malone are the co-authors of Leading with Love and Laughter. Zina has been leading development and diversity programs in the U.S. government for 20 years. Patrick Malone spent 23 years in the Navy, serving as an officer in the medical service corps. Today, she is also a faculty member of the key executive leadership program at American University, where Patrick is the director. “I look for people having fun at work – laughing. If I see people in a staff meeting cracking up with each other… that’s a good team. So, why hasn’t anyone written a book about this?” [9:05] The two talk about how they decided to write a book about love, laughter, and the workplace. “The perspective that we had on love was that it was a mutual admiration, respect, and care for one human being to another.” [11:00] It’s important to define ‘love’ early on – there are a lot of different types of love, after all. “People have this false idea that having emotions in the workplace, feeling love, and exuding that love for other people is a weakness.” [13:50] This isn’t true, as Zina says: “But the exact opposite is true: When you are so confident in yourself, in who you are, you know yourself well enough to know boundaries, to know what is right and wrong, how to approach people, what love feels like to you, what it should feel like to others, then you become the strongest person in the room.” [14:05]If you think you’re a leader, and you look over your shoulder and no one is following you… you’re just taking a walk. This happens at all levels of an organization. The science backs up Zina and Patrick’s book. According to research from Microsoft, the single most important factor for organization success and mission accomplishment is psychological safety. Check out the book for more deep dives into the science of love and laughter in the workplace.“Laughter in the workplace, people think ‘OK, I’m going to be a joke teller. But that’s not what it is at all. It’s much deeper than that.” [29:50] If you can develop environments where people feel free to laugh and love one another, you’re on the right path. If you walk into the room and everyone stops talking, there’s a problem. It’s important that your presence in the workplace breeds positivity and good feelings: or, love and laughter in other words. Love starts with self, as Zina says. Everyone, from the bottom of the corporate ladder to the very top, should focus on loving themselves. That’s how you really begin to love others. Take time out of your day to self-analysis, and determine what ‘self-love’ means for you. Small, one-on-one interactions create love. “Don’t make it about work,” [41:24] as Patrick says. Ask your employees or coworkers about their lives, about what’s going on with them. That’s how you create real, authentic connections.ResourcesFrom Boss to Leader: Sutch and Patrick Malone: www.sutchmalone.com
Unfear with Mark Minukas
Apr 7 2022
Unfear with Mark Minukas
Mark Minukas is the co-author of the book Unfear: Transform Your Organization to Create Breakthrough Performance and Employee Wellbeing. He’s the managing partner of Co-Creation Partners and an engineer by trade. He began his career as a Navy officer, before working as a consultant at Mackenzie and Company. There, he mastered the art of transforming teams and creating success. He has worked across multiple industries to build high-performing operations. “Even the most profitable companies on the planet aren’t fear-free. But here’s what makes them different: Those companies know how to transform that negative energy of fear and anxiety and uncertainty into opportunities for learning and growth and development.” [3:20]“Sometimes we see fear and love as two completely separate things. But part of what we want to communicate to the world is that fear can actually be this amazing cue for learning and growth.” [6:55]“I looked around and had this intense experience that it was all a mirage.” [9:45] After striving for the approval of other people, forces, or circumstances, Mark remembers an intense realization that would change his life forever. There’s the Fight Club and the Nice Club. Each of these groups represents different peoples’ approaches to life. The Fight Clubs needs to stand out and be special. The Nice Club, by contrast, are people that just keep their heads down. Likeables, minions, sticklers – people that shy away from conflict. “How can you drive performance and human well-being at the same time?” [20:00] is one of the questions Mark tackles in his book. All too often, leaders think it’s one or the other – it doesn’t have to be. “There’s a few key mindsets we talk about in our book. One of those is that you are infinite potential.” [24:22]“Shifting from a knower to a learner mindset” [25:45] is a critical part of Mark’s strategy. He affirms that we should go into situations ready to learn and ready to ask questions, rather than assuming we already know what to do. “Almost always we live through our assumptions and interpretations of the world… Oftentimes we engage with people without acknowledging the difference between observation and interpretation.” [36:15]“Organizations don’t transform, people do.” [39:05] “When a critical mass of people start shifting what they’re believing you can get the whole system to tip over.” [39:12] Mark says that this is how you enact true, meaningful change in an organization. Resourceswww.cocreationpartners.comwww.unfearbook.com