Inside EMS

EMS1 Podcasts

Keeping you on the pulse of what’s happening inside the EMS community. Catch up with Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson weekly as they discuss EMS life through good-natured banter and expert perspectives. Their vehicle for delivering the news and know how is that of two medics sitting on the truck between calls. Their mission is to make all listeners, EMS insiders. read less
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Episodes

Engaging frontline providers with quality improvement
5d ago
Engaging frontline providers with quality improvement
The latest episode of the Inside EMS podcast features a conversation with Mic Gunderson, president of the EMS Quality Academy and editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Paramedicine. The discussion offers insights into the evolution of EMS publications and the importance of quality and research in advancing the field. Memorable quotes "The people that most need to read current EMS research are the people most or least likely to read it." — Kelly Grayson“It isn't really the people that were sitting in the cubicle with the red pen, marking up, you know, paper charts you know, and playing quality cop in the corner that were going to change process and system design and fundamentally improve the quality of what we do. It's really about the whole way the organization is managed.” — Mic Gunderson Key takeaways The evolution of EMS publications. Gunderson detailed the journey from the inception of the National EMS Management Association (NEMSMA) to the creation of the International Journal of Paramedicine. Highlighting the shift from a quality manager's focus to a broader management perspective, the conversation underscored the journal's role in elevating EMS discussions through scholarly discourse.A platform for diverse discourse. The International Journal of Paramedicine aims to expand beyond clinical topics to include operations, administration and science, offering a wide lens on EMS practices.The challenge of engaging the frontline. A significant portion of the discussion revolved around engaging EMS practitioners in research and quality improvement. The podcast highlighted the need for accessible and relevant research to inform practice and encourage progressive changes in prehospital care.Community and collaboration. The podcast underscored the importance of community involvement in advancing EMS research and quality. Gunderson's call for volunteers and contributors to the journal reflects a commitment to inclusivity and collaboration within the EMS field. The episode serves as a reminder of the vital role of research, quality improvement and community collaboration in advancing EMS practices. About the sponsor This episode of the Inside EMS Podcast is sponsored by LogRx. Learn a better way to track your narcotics at LogRx.com. EMS1 is using generative AI to create some content that is edited and fact-checked by our editors.
Next-gen emergency response: How live streaming can transform 911 dispatch
Feb 7 2024
Next-gen emergency response: How live streaming can transform 911 dispatch
In this episode of the Inside EMS Podcast, cohosts Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson discuss Orange County, Florida's adoption of live stream technology for 911 calls, a move that promises to enhance the quality of emergency response through better triage and patient care. This episode of Inside EMS Podcast exemplifies the ongoing evolution of emergency medical services, marked by technological innovation, educational advancements, and the importance of leadership and community engagement in shaping the future of EMS. Learn more: Fla. county launches livestream option for 911 calls Cebollero and Grayson discussed how integrating video technology into 911 dispatch can improve EMS response in the following ways: Enhanced triage accuracy. Live streaming allows dispatchers to visually assess the situation, leading to more accurate triage and resource allocation. This visual context can be crucial in determining the urgency and nature of the response needed. By providing dispatchers with a live visual feed, EMS teams can be better prepared upon arrival, knowing what to expect and potentially improving patient outcomes.Supporting scene safety. Live streaming video in 911 dispatch can significantly improve scene safety for emergency medical personnel by providing real-time visuals of the incident site before their arrival. This advanced insight allows paramedics and EMTs to assess potential hazards, understand the severity of the situation, and prepare appropriate safety measures in advance. This technology empowers responders with crucial information, enabling them to make informed decisions about their approach and ensuring they can protect themselves effectively while delivering critical care.Improved dispatcher-patient interaction: The ability to see the caller and the scene in real-time enhances communication between dispatchers and those in need, fostering a more empathetic and effective exchange of information.Efficiency in emergency response. Visual cues obtained through live streaming can help in quickly identifying the nature of the emergency, potentially reducing response times and increasing the chances of a positive outcome.Enhanced training opportunities. Recorded live streams can serve as valuable training tools, offering real-life scenarios for emergency responders and dispatchers to learn from and improve their skills.Cross-agency collaboration. The integration of live streaming technology encourages collaboration between EMS, fire departments, police and other emergency services, enabling a more coordinated response to incidents. While enthusiastic about the potential of new technologies, Cebollero and Grayson also discussed the need for caution and the anticipation of unforeseen challenges, particularly concerning the privacy and security of live streamed 911 calls. Also in this episode Innovations in EMS. Chris Cebollero shared his new role with QuickMedic and their innovative approach to utilizing paramedics for urgent care in collaboration with healthcare partners, indicating a shift towards more versatile roles for EMS professionals. He emphasized the importance of leadership and vision in developing effective teams across multiple states.Education and training. Kelly Grayson shared experiences from teaching a new accelerated paramedic program, stressing the importance of rigorous standards and personalized feedback to ensure student success, highlighting the evolving educational methodologies in EMS training. About the sponsor This episode of the Inside EMS Podcast is sponsored by LogRx. Learn a better way to track your narcotics at LogRx.com. EMS1 is using generative AI to create some content that is edited and fact-checked by our editors.
Unraveling the complexities of heart blocks
Jan 31 2024
Unraveling the complexities of heart blocks
Heart blocks present a significant challenge to EMTs and paramedics, demanding a high level of expertise and precision in both diagnosis and treatment. Understanding the nuances of different types of heart blocks is crucial for effective patient management. The ability to accurately recognize and differentiate between various heart blocks, such as bifascicular, trifascicular and other types, is not just a matter of academic understanding but a vital skill in the fast-paced environment of EMS. In this episode of the Inside EMS podcast, cohosts Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson discuss how to train EMTs and paramedics to recognize, differentiate and treat heart blocks. Memorable quotes "Some of the drugs that we give are sometimes cause many problems as they solve." — Kelly Grayson "The best way to make an arrhythmia go away is to be prepared for the arrhythmia." — Kelly Grayson “One of the things that we're talking about here is pacing. And I don't think that that's two things that we do very well in EMS. Paramedics don't pace and paramedics don't cardiovert. And one of the things that you've got to be able to remember is when those patients need both.” — Chris Cebollero Key takeaways Understanding heart blocks, Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson delve deep into the recognition and differentiation of heart blocks. Grayson emphasizes the challenge EMTs face in distinguishing between various heart blocks, such as bifascicular and trifascicular blocks, highlighting the need for thorough training and understanding.Treatment approaches. The podcast hosts discuss the traditional and contemporary treatment approaches to heart blocks, focusing on medications like atropine, lidocaine and procainamide. Grayson points out the delicate balance between treating the arrhythmia and avoiding exacerbating the patient's condition.Electrical therapy preference. Both hosts advocate for the use of electrical therapy ("the Edison medicine") in critical cases of arrhythmias. They stress the importance of pacing in cases of bradycardia and cardioversion in tachycardia, especially when the patient is hemodynamically unstable.Patient-centric care. A recurring theme is the importance of treating the patient, not just the monitor readings. This includes understanding when to apply treatments and recognizing when a wait-and-see approach might be more beneficial.Educational insights. Grayson shares his teaching methods, including the use of analogies and the "AV block cheat sheet" to simplify complex concepts for EMTs and paramedics in training. This episode of the Inside EMS Podcast is sponsored by LogRx. Learn a better way to track your narcotics at LogRx.com.  EMS1 is using generative AI to create some content that is edited and fact-checked by our editors.
Emphasizing patient advocacy in EMS education
Jan 25 2024
Emphasizing patient advocacy in EMS education
Critical insights into the implications of recent court rulings on EMS practice and patient care This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. In this episode of the Inside EMS podcast, hosts Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson delve into the complex and ever-evolving legal and ethical dimensions EMS. This episode comes in the wake of a significant court ruling in which two paramedics were found guilty of criminally negligent homicide in the Elijah McClain case. The hosts discuss this judgment's far-reaching implications for EMS professionals, emphasizing the heightened legal scrutiny and accountability now present in the field. Memorable quotes "More and more, we are starting to see prosecutors making examples of paramedics, EMTs, who are not doing the right thing, or them thinking they're not doing the right thing, and our peers are now starting to get connected with murder and manslaughter charges, and it's something that we have to be very, very cognizant of." — Chris Cebollero "I think that where this case went off the rails is that both paramedics involved forgot that they were first and foremost patient advocates and were acting as law enforcement." — Kelly Grayson "We're doing our job with ego and this isn't about you. This is about the people that call for our help, and we've got to break that habit, because our poor interactions with people are leading to those national calls when these folks die." — Chris Cebollero "What could be the worst day of somebody's life ... that's powerful, right? People forget what a privilege that is. But we have to be able to remember that our ego is not good for medicine." — Chris Cebollero "You should train and educate yourself enough that you're not in doubt very often, but you should be conservative and call someone for, for consultation. That's what medical control is for." — Kelly Grayson Key takeaways Cebollero and Grayson discussed the growing legal scrutiny faced by EMS professionals, with the following takeaways: Importance of accurate medication dosage. The conversation emphasized the criticality of correctly estimating a patient’s weight for administering weight-based medications. Misjudgment in dosage, as seen in the McClain case, can lead to severe consequences.EMS education and training needs. The podcast underscored the need for continuous education and situational awareness among EMS practitioners. The hosts debated how such high-profile cases could influence EMS practices and potentially lead to overly cautious behavior, which might not always be in the patient's best interest. Cebollero and Grayson stress the necessity for precise patient assessment, a skill that goes beyond technical expertise to encompass a deep understanding of the patient's condition and needs. Their discussion points to a growing need for EMS education and training to adapt and address these challenges, ensuring that EMS practitioners are equipped to make informed decisions in high-stakes situations.Patient advocacy and interaction. Another key aspect of the conversation is the role of paramedics as patient advocates. The hosts argue that EMS professionals should prioritize their medical responsibilities over any perceived obligation to law enforcement. This episode critically examines the ethical considerations in EMS, particularly in scenarios involving mental health or police involvement. By sharing personal experiences and insights, Cebollero and Grayson highlight the delicate balance EMS providers must maintain between following protocol, ensuring patient safety and navigating complex legal landscapes. Read for more: The EMS system failed McClain and the justice system failed the paramedics] Rate and review the Inside EMS podcast Enjoying the show? Please take a moment to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts. Contact the Inside EMS team at theshow@ems1.com to share ideas, suggestions and feedback, or if you’d like to join us as a guest. Catch a new episode every Friday on Apple Podcasts, YouTube, PodBean, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Spotify, and RSS feed. EMS1 is using generative AI to create some content that is edited and fact-checked by our editors.
Inside EMS: Challenges and opportunities for EMS in 2024
Jan 17 2024
Inside EMS: Challenges and opportunities for EMS in 2024
This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. The first episode of Inside EMS in 2024, hosted by Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson, offered valuable insights into what’s needed to overcome the challenges for EMTs, paramedics and EMS agencies in the year ahead. Memorable quotes "We need to take charge and, and steer our profession, and generally we don't – as a profession, we tend to be reactive rather than proactive." — Kelly Grayson"We have to be worthy of [trust and respect]. And that's what we're trying to do here. So be better than the people you've seen." — Kelly Grayson"You don't let the people around you dictate your professionalism." — Chris Cebollero "Patient assessment is the most important skill a paramedic, EMT has." — Chris Cebollero Key takeaways 2024 EMS Trend Survey. The hosts highlighted the importance of the What Paramedics Want in 2024 annual EMS trend survey focusing on recruitment, retention, safety, health, wellness, technology adaptation and career development.[Insert Promo module linking directly to the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2024WPW-EMS1]Future of EMS system design. The podcast touched on the issues faced by volunteer and rural EMS agencies, emphasizing the need for innovative solutions and cooperation among various squads. The discussion focused on evolving EMS, particularly the potential shift from paramedic/EMT teams to dual EMT teams with paramedics in chase vehicles, to enhance the use of EMT capabilities.Advocating proactivity in EMS. Grayson stressed the importance of being proactive rather than reactive in shaping the EMS profession, especially in education and practice standards. Both cohosts underscored the importance of ongoing personal and professional development, advocating for a culture of continual learning and improvement in EMS.Enhancing education and professional standards. The conversation delved into the challenges of EMS education, particularly in teaching comprehensive patient assessment and encouraging paramedics to expect more of themselves. Grayson shared experiences from teaching paramedic classes, focusing on the need for instructors to balance high expectations with realistic goals for entry-level paramedics. The goal for 2024, as expressed by Grayson, is to produce a new wave of competent paramedics, challenging existing educational norms to improve overall EMS quality.Importance of patient assessment skills: The cohosts also emphasized the critical role of patient assessment in EMS, advocating for more thorough and continuous assessment throughout patient care. Read more. Rapid Response: Scene safety trumps patient care but does not replace duty The episode provided valuable insights into the current state and future directions of EMS, highlighting challenges and opportunities. These discussions are vital for EMTs and paramedics as they navigate their careers in 2024. EMS1 is using generative AI to create some content that is edited and fact-checked by our editors.
Voluntary AEMT accreditation: A ’game-changer’ in EMS education
Dec 14 2023
Voluntary AEMT accreditation: A ’game-changer’ in EMS education
CoAEMSP’s Executive Director, George W. Hatch Jr., discusses the EMS accreditation journey This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. The Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the Emergency Medical Services Professions (CoAEMSP) plans to launch a voluntary programmatic accreditation for Advanced Emergency Medical Technicians (AEMTs) by January. In this episode of Inside EMS1, cohost Chris Cebollero sits down with George W. Hatch Jr., EdD, LP, EMT-P, FAEMS, CoAEMSP’s executive director, to discuss the program. Top takeaways AEMT is not just an EMT with additional skills; it requires a broader skill set, including understanding pathophysiology and critical thinking.The decision to introduce voluntary accreditation for AEMT programs wasn't preplanned but came about due to discussions within the EMS community.This accreditation process is voluntary, and programs that choose not to pursue it can continue operating as they do currently.Accreditation will help standardize AEMT programs, improve pass rates on the national registry exam, and enhance the quality of EMS education.The process involves benchmarking programs against a set standard, and programs must satisfy sponsorship requirements.While there is no plan to extend this accreditation to EMT programs at the moment, it may be considered in the distant future if deemed necessary.Accreditation is part of the journey to elevate EMS to a profession and should be supported by those in the field.It's essential to stop complaining about the state of EMS education and start actively contributing to its improvement. Memorable quotes "It's about a process of improvement, a continual process of improvement." — Dr. Hatch"EMS may or may not be the choice that a lot of people want to make. We have to make it attractive and say, this is what you have to do to be in our profession." — Dr. Hatch EMS1 is using generative AI to create some content that is edited and fact-checked by our editors.
Complacency kills: A critical look at EMS incidents and policy in 2023
Dec 8 2023
Complacency kills: A critical look at EMS incidents and policy in 2023
This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. In this year's Inside EMS year-in-review episode, our cohosts, Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson, take a critical look at the major incidents that defined EMS in 2023. Together, they tackle: Paramedics behaving badly The episode begins with a focus on the troubling trend of subpar patient care and missteps. The hosts emphasize the importance of delivering compassionate and professional care on every call. They discuss the case in which EMS providers faced charges of first-degree murder after a patient died due to positional asphyxia, underscoring the need for accountability in the profession. Violence against providers Next, the hosts address the increasing incidents of violence against EMTs, including stabbings and assaults. They highlight the need for better safety measures and policies to protect EMS personnel. Criminalization of medical errors Shifting gears, the hosts delve into instances of medical errors, such as administering the wrong drug. They stress the critical importance of delivering high-quality patient care on every call, regardless of the nature of the complaint. Focus on CPR The discussion then turns to a dramatic moment in the NFL when Damar Hamlin went into cardiac arrest after a hit during a game. The hosts commend the quick response of athletic staff and paramedics, emphasizing the significance of well-executed resuscitation efforts. The demise of ET3 Finally, Chris and Kelly address the unexpected premature end of the ET3 model, a pilot program aimed at improving EMS care and reimbursement. The hosts express disappointment in CMS's decision and question the rationale behind it. In conclusion, this year-in-review podcast provides valuable insights into the challenges and triumphs of the EMS field in the past year. It highlights the need for accountability, safety measures and ongoing efforts to improve patient care and EMS policies. Memorable quote: "Every single call that we run has to be done with the utmost dedication, commitment, professionalism, as if it was the last or maybe even the first EMS call we've ever run. Complacency is what kills there." EMS1 is using generative AI to create some content that is edited and fact-checked by our editors.
‘Keepers of the flame’: Reflecting on the role of preceptors
Nov 30 2023
‘Keepers of the flame’: Reflecting on the role of preceptors
This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. In this episode of Inside EMS, hosts Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson delve into the crucial role of preceptors in EMS training and the impact they have on shaping the future of the profession. They emphasize the significance of preceptors as the "keepers of the flame" who pass on traditions and knowledge to new generations of EMS providers. Memorable quotes "Preceptors have a fundamental understanding of their role in shaping the future of the profession." — Kelly Grayson"Legacy. The keepers of the flame are not the instructors. They're not the officers. Officers come and go, but the preceptors are the keepers of the flame and pass on the traditions." — Kelly Grayson"Preceptors are probably the most important component of EMS education." — Kelly Grayson The hosts discuss the challenges and responsibilities of being a preceptor, emphasizing the need for preceptors to understand their role in shaping the future of EMS. They also touch on the importance of legacy and how preceptors play a pivotal role in maintaining and passing down the profession's traditions. Grayson underscores the value of preceptors, highlighting that they are the individuals who can guide and mentor new EMS providers, ultimately affecting the lives of countless patients. He emphasizes the importance of recognizing preceptors as vital contributors to EMS education. Listen to next: ‘You don’t know everything there is to know about EMS’ EMS1 is using generative AI to create some content that is edited and fact-checked by our editors.
Transforming EMS leadership: Beyond buzzwords to real change
Nov 17 2023
Transforming EMS leadership: Beyond buzzwords to real change
This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. In this episode of the Inside EMS podcast, the discussion centered on the practical application of leadership in EMS. The conversation highlighted the gap between commonly used leadership buzzwords and their real-world implementation. Key points Employee engagement and empowerment. The need for genuine engagement and empowerment in the workplace was stressed. Kelly Grayson shares an example of providing discounted meals for employees during hectic schedules as a concrete example of servant leadership.Leadership by buzzwords. Our cohosts raise concerns about leaders in EMS who rely on buzzwords without understanding their practical implications. They suggest many EMS leaders are caught up in an "ego vortex," focusing more on authority and titles rather than service and care.Personal leadership journey. Chris Cebollero shares his personal journey from being a "horrible leader" to understanding the essence of effective leadership. He emphasizes the importance of emotional control and viewing challenges as solutions.Systemic issue in EMS leadership. The discussion highlights a systemic problem in EMS leadership, pointing out the lack of formal training and understanding of the art and science of leadership. Our cohosts stress that success in leadership should be measured by the engagement, satisfaction and productivity of the workforce.The Peter Principle. The conversation touches on the Peter Principle, where individuals are promoted to their level of incompetence. They note often, leaders are not equipped with the necessary tools and training for their roles.Difference between managers and leaders. A distinction is made between managers and leaders. Managers are described as those who enforce policies and procedures, whereas leaders are seen as doing the right thing and then justifying it officially. Learn more: Visit the EMS Leader Playbook Memorable quotes: "The true measurement of leadership success is how engaged, satisfied and productive the workforce is. Nothing else matters." — Chris Cebollero"Leadership is both an art and a science. You've got to know and understand the science before you can paint the portrait of organizational success." — Chris Cebollero This episode underscores the need for a paradigm shift in EMS leadership, moving away from traditional authoritative styles to a more engaged, empathetic and service-oriented approach. Rate and review Enjoying the show? Please take a moment to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts. Contact the Inside EMS team at theshow@ems1.com to share ideas, suggestions and feedback, or if you’d like to join us as a guest. EMS1 is using generative AI to create some content that is edited and fact-checked by our editors.
Chick-fil-A vs. the duty to act
Nov 9 2023
Chick-fil-A vs. the duty to act
This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. In this episode of Inside EMS, hosts Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson discuss an incident that sparked fierce debate within the EMS community. The incident in question occurred on October 27, 2023, when a Washington, D.C., firefighter/EMT was dismissed for stopping at a Chick-fil-A before responding to an ALS call. The hosts discuss the ethical implications of this decision, emphasizing the duty to act in emergency services. Cebollero and Grayson, while acknowledging the challenging landscape of working in EMS, stressed that personal needs and comfort should never compromise the responsibility to respond to emergencies. They shared personal experiences of missing meals due to service calls. The hosts stress how the duty to act commitment to help others should always outweigh personal needs in emergency services. The discussion also centered on the commendable actions of D.C. Fire and EMS in addressing the incident. Grayson was firm in his belief that the action taken by the D.C. firefighter/EMT was unequivocally unethical and damaging to the public trust. The hosts underscored the importance of upholding the greatest standards of ethics and responsibility, even when not in the public eye. Memorable quotes "Ethics are how you behave when no one is looking. There's not a whole lot of gray area in ethical situations." — Kelly Grayson"The whole point of 911 and the honor of what we do is, you call, we come: no question." — Kelly Grayson"I can’t count the number of times I have been waiting in line for food and I've been dispatched to a call. I've had to get out of line. I've had to lose my money. I didn't get a chance to eat that day." — Chris Cebollero"We have a duty to act. We have to be able to respond as we need to respond, regardless of our own personal needs." — Chris Cebollero Read next: Duty to act, assess, treat and transport. A legal refresher for EMS providers RATE AND REVIEW Enjoying the show? Please take a moment to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts. Contact the Inside EMS team at theshow@ems1.com to share ideas, suggestions and feedback, or if you’d like to join us as a guest. EMS1 is using generative AI to create some content that is edited and fact-checked by our editors.
Pioneering paramedicine: How SCCAD tackles substance use disorders
Nov 3 2023
Pioneering paramedicine: How SCCAD tackles substance use disorders
This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. In this episode of Inside EMS, hosts Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson discuss innovative approaches in EMS with guests Chief David Lewis and Kyle Gaines from the St. Charles County Ambulance District in Missouri. The district's unique approach to paramedicine, specifically in terms of substance use disorders, opioid use disorders and behavioral health, forms the crux of the conversation. Lewis shares how the escalating number of overdose cases necessitated a novel approach to community paramedicine. Starting as a passion project to save lives, the St. Charles County Mobile Integrated Healthcare Network was born from a need to tackle the overdose epidemic more effectively. Initially adopting a model from Ohio that involved paramedics, social workers and law enforcement officers responding to overdoses, they soon realized patients were reticent to engage when law enforcement was present. This led to the evolution of the program, with paramedics being specially trained to handle sensitive conversations, helping patients access treatment. Gaines discusses how educating their team members about addiction was instrumental in overcoming initial resistance to the program and ensuring its success. In the years since its inception, the program has grown and has proven to be effective, with about one in four patients they encounter eventually sitting in front of a treatment counselor. Read more: $1.5M grant allows SCCAD’s expansion of substance abuse program RATE AND REVIEW Enjoying the show? Please take a moment to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts. Contact the Inside EMS team at theshow@ems1.com to share ideas, suggestions and feedback, or if you’d like to join us as a guest. EMS1 is using generative AI to create some content that is edited and fact-checked by our editors.
Navigating EMS assessments: A dive into best practices
Oct 26 2023
Navigating EMS assessments: A dive into best practices
This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. In this episode of Inside EMS, hosts Chris Cebollero Kelly Grayson delve into the intricacies of patient assessments in emergency medical situations. They dissect the value of thorough assessments versus focused evaluations, highlighting the critical role of differential diagnosis and the dire need for feedback in honing EMS skills. The duo debate whether a detailed head-to-toe assessment is always necessary or if a focused assessment based on the chief complaint suffices. Chris opines that a thorough examination provides a fuller picture, vital in cases where patients may not have seen a healthcare professional in years. Kelly, on the other hand, advocates for a focused approach, emphasizing efficiency and relevancy to the primary complaint, especially in high-pressure emergency scenarios. The dialogue unveils a significant challenge in EMS education and practice – the delineation between a medical and trauma assessment, and the traditional versus a more systems-based approach to patient evaluations. They both acknowledge that the nature and depth of assessments could vary based on the patient's ability to participate in the examination. One eye-opening anecdote from Chris revealed a situation where a misdiagnosis by a doctor led to a critical oversight in patient care, underscoring the importance of independent assessments and differential diagnosis in EMS practice. Chris shares a valuable lesson from this experience, emphasizing the need to "talk oneself into the diagnosis" rather than accepting a preliminary diagnosis at face value. Kelly also addressed a fundamental challenge in EMS – the lack of feedback, which stifles the opportunity for professionals to refine their assessment skills and knowledge base. He asks, "how difficult it is to improve the art of assessment and your skills if you don't get feedback?" The hosts encourage EMS professionals to share their insights and best practices, acknowledging the collective effort required to enhance patient assessment methodologies and ultimately, patient care. They wrap up the discussion with an invitation for listener feedback, fostering an ongoing dialogue to advance EMS practice. The episode serves as a catalyst for a broader conversation on patient assessment best practices, urging EMS practitioners to continually evaluate and refine their approach towards patient care, thereby enhancing the overall quality and efficacy of emergency medical services. RATE AND REVIEW Enjoying the show? Please take a moment to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts. Contact the Inside EMS team at theshow@ems1.com to share ideas, suggestions and feedback, or if you’d like to join us as a guest. EMS1 is using generative AI to create some content that is edited and fact-checked by our editors.
Hung jury: EMS lessons from an unsuccessfully tried murder case
Oct 12 2023
Hung jury: EMS lessons from an unsuccessfully tried murder case
This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. In this episode of Inside EMS, cohosts Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson discuss the importance of integrity, documentation and tracking errors in the field. Chris spent the past week in jury duty, listening to prosecutors unsuccessfully try a murder case that resulted in a hung jury. He shares details that tripped up law enforcement officers testifying in the case, and the jury’s perspective on errors made, lies told and how integrity doubts derailed the case.   Memorable quotes “One of the things that you need to be able to remember is you should not talk about anything that is not written in your report, because they will tear it apart, and I watched that happen ... when we talk about documentation, why documentation is very, very important is because it's the little nuances that you leave out that now you're going to discuss that are going to get you into trouble.” — Chris Cebollero “In working with Gene Gandy back in the day …  he used to say that the plaintiff's attorney – in a malpractice case – his job is to make you look like a sloppy idiot, and your attorney's job is to make you look like Johnny Gage. And the weapon that each one of them will use is your report. And it's up to you to determine who it's more valuable to: the plaintiff's attorney or your attorney.” — Kelly Grayson “We, in civil cases in EMS, we don't really get a jury of our peers. You know, we may have people who are demographically very similar to us, but as far as judging our actions, what they know is Hollywood, which is about as realistic a portrayal of EMS and medicine in general as your average Disney movie.” — Kelly Grayson “The briefer your remarks, the better your case is going to be received, and that's true, you know, it's probably just like an EMS lecture. If you go on forever and ever, you lose people. You want to capture their interest, say what you need to say, and set the stage for what's going to come.” — Kelly Grayson Rate and review Enjoying the show? Please take a moment to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts. Contact the Inside EMS team at theshow@ems1.com to share ideas, suggestions and feedback, or if you’d like to join us as a guest.
Chief Gary Ludwig on fixing medics’ terrible charting
Oct 5 2023
Chief Gary Ludwig on fixing medics’ terrible charting
This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. In this episode of Inside EMS, cohosts Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson welcome Chief Gary Ludwig to the podcast. The group discuss imparting knowledge to new medics and Ludwig’s latest book, “385 Things Veteran EMTs and Paramedics Can Teach You: Emergency Medical Technician and Paramedic Tips and Tricks of the Trade.” The book contains information on patient assessment, managing airways, starting IVs, penetrating trauma, crimes scenes and more. Chief Ludwig shares his experience with terrible PCRs, and why we should be teaching medics to write reports like our law enforcement partners. He shares tips like: Why you should always stay in the left laneHow to avoid tipping stretchersWhy to avoid abbreviations in PCRs For a signed copy, visit www.garyludwigbooks.com. About our guest  Gary Ludwig is a well-known author, educator, speaker, and consultant who has served in three fire departments over his career. His fire, EMS, rescue, 911 and emergency management career spans a total of 46 years, including 35 years in two metropolitan cities, St. Louis and Memphis. He has been a paramedic for over 44 years. He served as the president of the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) during the 2019-20 term, and was selected as the International Career Fire Chief of the Year in 2022. He has a master’s degree in business and management.  He has written over 500 articles for professional fire and EMS publications and is the author of four books.  He has also been invited to speak at over 400 professional EMS or fire conferences or seminars. He has won numerous awards including the International Career Fire Chief of the Year in 2022, the James O. Page EMS Leadership Award in 2014 and the IAFC EMS Section’s James O Page Achievement Award in 2018. He has managed two award-winning metropolitan EMS systems (Memphis and St. Louis) and was fire chief of an ISO Class 1 fire department (Champaign).  In 2022, he was appointed by FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell to the National Advisory Council for FEMA.
Overcoming addiction: A first responder’s recovery journey
Sep 28 2023
Overcoming addiction: A first responder’s recovery journey
This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. Suicide is always preventable. If you are having thoughts of suicide or feeling suicidal, please call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline immediately at 988. Counselors are also available to chat at www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org. Remember: You deserve to be supported, and it is never too late to seek help. Speak with someone today. In this episode of Inside EMS, our cohosts,  Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson, are joined by Willie Doan, a paramedic and academy coordinator from Newcastle, Delaware, to discuss the rampant issues of stress, depression, burnout, substance abuse and suicide among first responders. A recovering alcoholic, Doan shares his story of addiction, beginning with his first drink at 14, acknowledging that he often drank more than his peers, but never recognized it as a problem. As he joined EMS and began witnessing distressing scenes as part of his job, he continued to drink, sometimes using his work as an excuse, whether it was to celebrate a successful resuscitation or to numb the pain of a bad call. Despite his dedication to his duty, Doan admits that his addiction worsened. He didn't acknowledge his alcohol problem until he was in rehab and was educated about how substance abuse affects the brain. His turning point came about 604 days ago, when he was arrested on suspicion of DUI, his second in 6 years. Waking up with no recollection of the event, he asked his mother, "What's wrong with me?" This moment marked the beginning of his journey to recovery. Throughout the discussion, Willie underscores the importance of recognizing and addressing addiction in high-stress professions like first responders. His story serves as a reminder that recovery is possible, and that seeking help is the first step towards overcoming addiction. EMS1 is using generative AI to create some content that is edited and fact-checked by our editors.  Additional resources Addiction in EMS providers: Always see the human sideGordon Graham: First responders are not immune from the opioid crisis; here's what to knowSelf-care tips to recover from a traumatic EMS incidentHealthy coping mechanisms: The most effective ways to combat stressThe Code Green Campaign: Mental health resources for first responders
How can we save rural EMS?
Sep 18 2023
How can we save rural EMS?
This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. In this episode, our cohosts,  Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson discuss the dire straights for rural EMS as Kelly settles into his new region in upstate New York. Tune in as they discuss: Why EMS isn’t deemed essential. Though more states are making moves to designate EMS an “essential” service, it’s not universal. What will the designation mean for EMS – and will it be a tax base?The volunteer shortage. With volunteers aging out of EMS, how do we bring new volunteers in? The diminishing numbers are not due to generational differences, Kelly says. “I used to be one of those people who said, ‘aw, kids these days,’ … it’s not the kids that are bad, it’s that EMS has failed to adapt to the times,” he noted.Getting over ego and grudges. Mergers and consolidation are a path to stem EMS closures, but require getting over old conflicts and for someone to step aside and make way for growth. They ask for your input: What will save rural EMS? Chat with our hosts at theshow@ems1.com. RATE AND REVIEW Catch a new episode every Friday on Apple Podcasts, YouTube, PodBean, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Spotify, and RSS feed. Enjoying the show? Please take a moment to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts. Contact the Inside EMS team at theshow@ems1.com to share ideas, suggestions and feedback, or if you’d like to join us as a guest.
Finding new solutions to old problems
Sep 14 2023
Finding new solutions to old problems
This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. Inside EMS has been serving up industry news and hot topics for 10 years, with over 600 shows and about 2 million listens! In this episode, our cohosts,  Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson discuss the importance of getting outside your rig, your agency and your silo to learn from others. Our dynamic duo break down an article from rural EMS expert Nancy Magee on the top 10 reasons to attend EMS conferences. Memorable quotes “If you’ve seen one EMS squad, you’ve seen one EMS squad, and way too many agencies only know their way of doing things, and they kind of stagnate – or they run the risk of stagnating – if they don’t get outside their own little bubble and see the ways that other agencies are doing things.” — Kelly Grayson “If you feel like you’re the smartest person in the room; you’re in the wrong room.” — Kelly Grayson “There are people who are doing the work in organizations who are far more advanced than you are.” — Chris Cebollero “There are very few new problems under the sun.” — Kelly Grayson Listen in as they discuss: Getting out of your comfort zone/tearing down your silosThe benefit of networking – seeing what’s working for other agenciesHow enthusiasm is infectious Additional resources 10 reasons to attend EMS conferencesEMS World Expo 2023: Welcome to New OrleansCan’t make it to EMS World Expo? Rate and review Catch a new episode every Friday on Apple Podcasts, YouTube, PodBean, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Spotify, and RSS feed. Enjoying the show? Please take a moment to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts. Contact the Inside EMS team at theshow@ems1.com to share ideas, suggestions and feedback, or if you’d like to join us as a guest. LIST
Legacy, vigilance and cohesiveness
Sep 7 2023
Legacy, vigilance and cohesiveness
This episode of the Inside EMS podcast is sponsored by Verizon Frontline. The advanced network for first responders on the front lines. Learn more at verizon.com/frontline. “To remember those who have sacrificed, and who ran up the stairs and escorted people in the eyes of danger, you owe it to them to try to be your best every day.” — Aaron Zamzow In this special crossover episode of the Policing Matters, Better Every Shift and Inside EMS podcasts, Cohosts Jim Dudley, Aaron Zamzow and Chris Cebollero come together to discuss preserving the legacy of 9/11 responders and to assess our readiness to respond to a large-scale MCI in our communities. Together, they dive into technology trends that we could (and should!) use to improve the security of citizens and first responders, from license plate readers to crime mapping, facial recognition, drone surveillance and AI analysis. Watch in as our panel discusses: Keeping the 9/11 legacy alive with new generationsHow awareness of occupational cancer and mental health concerns is more prevalent todayCommunity preparedness and incident command9/11-related illness and its continued impact and devastation todayHow AI can contribute to the security of citizens and first respondersThe importance of information sharing and security Memorable quotes Our cohosts shared poignant reflections of the infamous September day and offered their analysis on how best to prepare first responders for large-scale mass casualty events, with several notable takeaways: “It’s up to all of us to try to get better, try to improve, try to do something to hone our profession to provide the best service we can when we’re called to do that. And that doesn’t require a chief, that doesn’t require leadership; that requires a mirror, and that requires you and some dedication.” — Aaron Zamzow “After 9/11, we had PPE in the trunk of every radio car, and training every year, and little-by-little, the suits expired, the training stopped, the funds ran out; and we may be at a situation worse than before, so we need that impetus to take another run at preparedness, training, exercises, PPE, equipment, and a best practices manual, and that’s got to come from above so that we’re all doing it the same.” — Jim Dudley “The economic factor should not be a factor. FEMA puts out 100, 200, 700, 800 for free to law enforcement agencies and many more subsets beyond that. So if you are an agency – if you’re listening to this podcast – if you’re not practicing ICS, find out why and explain to your chief sheriff, ‘it’s free, we’ve got to do it; we should start doing it now.” — Jim Dudley  “We’re not working for today – we’re working for the next 5 and 10 and 15 years now – and how do we need to prepare for this?” — Chris Cebollero “We saw firefighters run into that building – there were police officers there too – that were in harm’s way, trying to get people out of there, and that’s what we do, and now we’re seeing ‘hey, even though we do that, there are harms beyond just that physical incident.’” — Aaron Zamzow “We’re in protective service and we need to be proactive in the way that we look at these things … we looked and said this could never happen; well it did, and we did a heck of a job responding after the fact, and we were very proactive after a period of time, and I think that’s gotten a little bit lax and we need to stay on our toes, stay vigilant, and I think that’s one of the best ways to remember all those people sacrificed in these events, is to grow from them.” — Aaron Zamzow Additional resources Read more reflections, tips for processing and lessons for training to respond to MCIs in our 9/11 coverage, sponsored by Verizon. Learn more with these resources mentioned in this episode, as well as additional articles from Police1, FireRescue1 and EMS1: The Raytom Group – training law enforcement officers in EMSPolicing Matters: BRINC's Blake Resnick and Don Redmond on evolving drone technology‎Policing Matters: Jamie Hudson on how Elk Grove’s Real-Time Information Center gathers and shares information AI in action: Enhancing school security with ZeroEyes' gun detection systemFEMA’s free ICS trainingWhy all law enforcement officers should read the 9/11 Commission ReportPOV: ‘It is time to demand adherence to NIMS/ICS and accountability for failure to implement’On-Demand Webinar: What Firefighters Want from Incident CommandersAre we communicating better after 9/11?Responding to an MCI of 9/11’s proportions, with today’s limitations Rate and review Catch a new episode of Inside EMS every Friday on Apple Podcasts, YouTube, PodBean, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Spotify, and RSS feed. Enjoying the show? Please take a moment to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts. Contact the Inside EMS team at theshow@ems1.com to share ideas, suggestions and feedback, or if you’d like to join us as a guest.
Where is the place for ChatGPT in EMS?
Aug 31 2023
Where is the place for ChatGPT in EMS?
This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. “Tell me a time when you were stressed and how you dealt with it.” You’ve like heard, answered or asked a variation of that question in one or more interviews during your career. But how can interviewers get more from their questions? In this episode of Inside EMS, cohosts Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson discuss a recent article by Lexipol Editorial Director, Greg Friese, MS, NRP; “How to use ChatGPT for paramedic interviewing, selection.” In the article, Greg outlines how leaders can use Chat GPT to craft panel interview questions, and a sample prompt: I am interviewing applicants for a full-time job as a paramedic at a busy, private ambulance service that responds to 911 calls and interfacility transport requests. One component of the process is a panel interview with the operations supervisor, a field training officer and an experienced paramedic. Recommend five scenario-based questions the panel should ask each applicant.  In this episode, Chris and Kelly put Greg’s prompt to the test and debate, should we be using AI in our daily work in EMS? Tune in to this episode Listen in as our hosts discuss: Other use cases for generative AI in EMS – from scenarios to deployment plansHow AI is a potential resources – as well as a potential headache – for educatorsTakeaways from the recent 2023 NAEMSE SymposiumFlattening the forgetting curve – retaining training And don’t miss a side debate: is there a case for prehospital ultrasound? Memorable quotes “When we think about interviewing, that’s when people really will put the dog on; they are giving us the very best of who they are and we are just getting answers to questions that may or may not be true, and we really have to try to decipher, but how do we challenge these people who are coming in?” — Chris Cebollero “Our dean walked into the office and said, ‘I need you all to start thinking about how we can use ChatGPT and generative AI to enhance and augment our paramedic program.” — Kelly Grayson “The better you are at writing prompts and giving it some specific direction, the better content it’s going to churn out for you.” — Kelly Grayson Let us know how you’re using AI in EMS: contact editor@ems1.com. Rate and review Catch a new episode of Inside EMS every Friday on Apple Podcasts, YouTube, PodBean, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Spotify, and RSS feed. Enjoying the show? Please take a moment to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts. Contact the Inside EMS team at theshow@ems1.com to share ideas, suggestions and feedback, or if you’d like to join us as a guest.
Getting into the uncomfort zone
Aug 11 2023
Getting into the uncomfort zone
Get better every shift with stress management and leadership insights from Aaron Zamzow and Janelle Foskett This episode of Inside EMS is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com. In this special episode of Inside EMS, Host Chris Cebollero welcomes the dynamic hosts of the Better Every Shift Podcast, Aaron Zamzow and Janelle Foskett. In Better Every Shift, Zamzow, a Madison (Wisconsin) firefighter; and Foskett, editor-in-chief of FireRescue1, spotlight the passion and perseverance of firefighters and EMS providers, as they dig into what drives responders to improve themselves, their crew, the service as a whole. Listen in to get better every day, every call, every shift.   In this episode, they discuss: Getting out of your comfort zoneThe issues no one wants to talk about in the fire service (e.g., recruitment and sleep)Leadership and stress managementManaging upThe need for leadership trainingHow a staffing crisis leads to a leadership crisis, that leads to a stress crisis – and the ramifications on health and wellness Foskett also shares insights from the FireRescue1 "What firefighters want in 2023 report," into firefighter stress. Foskett notes among respondents, 46% reported considering leaving their fire department – mostly due to staffing – and a staggering 42% of firefighters are considering leaving the fire service due to their stress levels. Memorable quotes “In order to be a better whatever – paramedic, firefighter, EMT, podcaster – you need to get out of your comfort zone.” — Aaron Zamzow “We’re really starving for leadership, but in the same breath, we’re looking in the maybe the wrong places, whereas we should be starting in the mirror and then looking out.” — Aaron Zamzow “People are craving leadership and when there is a lack of leadership, that doesn’t mean all is lost; you have options, you have solutions, and you can take ownership of that and be proactive.” — Janelle Foskett “There are some of those fire houses, they don’t turn a wheel in a 24 hour period; there are other ones that don’t get to see their beds in a 24 hour period. It’s one of the things that we now have to start to think about. We’re still running models for EMS and fire that we were running 40 years ago.” — Chris Cebollero  Learn more Follow Better Every Shift on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcastsor wherever you listen to your podcastsDownload the "What firefighters want in 2023 report" for more insights into staffing and stress reliefDownload the "What paramedics want in 2023 report" for insights into mitigating stress, staffing challenges and leadership shortfalls