Church Life Today

OSV Podcasts

Hosted by Dr. Leonard DeLorenzo, of the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame (http://mcgrath.nd.edu), Church Life Today features conversations with pastoral leaders and scholars from around the country and covers issues that matter most to Church life today. Church Life Today is an OSV Podcasts partner.

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Episodes

Behold God’s Love: A Eucharistic Musical, with Carolyn Pirtle
3d ago
Behold God’s Love: A Eucharistic Musical, with Carolyn Pirtle
“I am the vine, you are the branches. Whoever remains in me and I in him will bear much fruit” (John 15:5).Disciples are Christ’s branches. We grow from him. His life courses through us. The fruit we bear is the sign of his love.As the Eucharistic Revival in the United States reaches its culmination this summer, we at Notre Dame are marking the occasion in a special way, with the performance of an original, three-act musical called “Behold God’s Love.” The first of the three acts is “Root”, which draw us into the Book of Exodus, where we encounter the Passover and the Manna in the Desert. The second act is “Vine,” which focuses on the Last Supper and Jesus’ meal ministry. And the third act is “Branches,” where we join the early Christian community at Corinth to receive the Eucharistic teaching and gift.Today, the creator and composer of this new musical joins me to talk about what we can expect and how we will benefit, in our faith and reverence, from enjoying this work of art. Carolyn Pirtle is Program Director of the Center for Liturgy, here in the McGrath Institute for Church Life. She and her cast are preparing this musical now, which will be performed twice on July 6, 2024, both at 1pm and at 7pm in the O’Laughlin Auditorium at Saint Mary’s College. It is a free but ticketed event, and you can get your tickets before they run out at the link in our show notes.Follow-up Resources:Find more information about and tickets for “Behold God’s Love” “Eucharistic Beliefs among Adult Catholics, with Tim O’Malley,” podcast episode via Church Life Today“Preparing for First Communion, Part 2: The Passover and the Last Supper,” podcast episode via Church Life Today“Rekindling Eucharistic Amazement, with Jem Sullivan,” podcast episode via Church Life Today“The Passion, with J.J. Wright,” podcast episode via Church Life TodayThis episode is sponsored by Catholic Charities USA.  Help Catholic Charities serve your neighbors in need. Join us at www.WeAreThere.USChurch Life Today is a partnership between the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame and OSV Podcasts from Our Sunday Visitor. Discover more ways to live, learn, and love your Catholic faith at osvpodcasts.com. Sharing stories, starting conversations.
From Possessiveness to Gratitude, with Tania Geist
Jun 3 2024
From Possessiveness to Gratitude, with Tania Geist
The Lord gives us what we cannot make or do for ourselves. Our first task in life is to receive. And from what we receive, we are to be changed. The mystery of the Eucharist abides in that exchange: receiving, becoming.In a new book titled Eucharist: The Real Presence of Christ, my longtime friend Tania Geist presents twelve substantive Eucharistic reflections that help small groups discover, discuss, prepare for, and respond to the gift and mission of the Eucharist. Our conversation today will touch on the meaning of the Eucharist, the gift of peace, God sustaining us with simplicity and joy, and the movement from possessiveness to gratitude.About today's guest: Tania M. Geist has worked as an editor and writer of Catholic books, newspapers, journals, and other media. Her reflections in these pages have been especially shaped by her time studying theology and philosophy at Blackfriars of Oxford University; her years translating and editing Pope Benedict XVI’s preaching for L’Osservatore Romano newspaper inside Vatican City, and the decade during which her young family was part of the community at the University of Notre Dame. There, she received a master’s degree in systematic theology and served as an editor for Church Life Journal.Geist currently resides in Providence, Rhode Island, with her scripture-scholar husband and their four spunky young children. As a small business owner, she runs Book Pocket, LLC, which provides editorial and audio event services.Follow-up Resources:“The Folly of Mine” by Tania Geist, article in the Church Life Journal“Matter Matters: One the Need for a Pastoral Theology of Radical Particularity” by Tania Geist, article in the Church Life Journal“Motherhood and the Paschal Mystery” by Tania Geist, article in the Church Life Journal“Eucharist Beliefs Among Adult Catholics, with Tim O’Malley,” podcast episode on Church Life Today“Augustine on the Eucharist, with Elizabeth Klein,” podcast episode on Church Life TodayChurch Life Today is a partnership between the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame and OSV Podcasts from Our Sunday Visitor. Discover more ways to live, learn, and love your Catholic faith at osvpodcasts.com. Sharing stories, starting conversations.
Living Authentically Catholic in a Divided America, with Ken Craycraft
May 6 2024
Living Authentically Catholic in a Divided America, with Ken Craycraft
It’s hard—and getting harder—to discern the proper relationship between our Catholic faith and American political life. Perhaps it is time to reset the framework for how we engage politics as Catholics, even by broadening our understanding of our duty to public life beyond merely politics. In his new book, Citizens Yet Strangers, Kenneth Craycraft challenges Catholics to move away from individual liberal impulses of American political identity. He seeks to set out a vision for how we orient our moral and civic lives based on the dignity of the human person, through the practices of solidarity and subsidiarity, and toward a true and worthy vision of the common good.Kenneth Craycraft is the James J. Gardner Family Chair of Moral Theology at Mount St. Mary’s Seminary & School of Theology, the seminary for the Catholic Archdiocese of Cincinnati. He writes a monthly syndicated column for OSV News, a weekly column for Our Sunday Visitor (“Grace is Everywhere”), and monthly columns for The Catholic Telegraph and the U.K.-based Catholic Herald. Dr. Craycraft is also the author of The American Myth of Religious Freedom. He is a licensed attorney in Ohio, who holds a Ph.D. in theology from Boston College and a J.D. from Duke University School of Law.Follow-up Resources:Citizens Yet Stranger: Living Authentically Catholic in a Divided America (OSV, 2024), by Kenneth Craycraft“‘Say my name’: Self-Deception, Transparency, and Redemption in Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul, with Ken Craycraft,” podcast episode via Church Life TodayChurch Life Today is a partnership between the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame and OSV Podcasts from Our Sunday Visitor. Discover more ways to live, learn, and love your Catholic faith at osvpodcasts.com. Sharing stories, starting conversations.
Suffering, with Mark Giszczak
Mar 18 2024
Suffering, with Mark Giszczak
Suffering is universal. But how do we understand suffering? Does it have meaning? Can it have meaning? And most of all, what is the meaning of suffering in Christian life? Questions like these inform the work of my guest today, Dr. Mark Giszczak, author of the new book Suffering: What Every Catholic Should Know. Dr. Giszczak is Professor of Sacred Scripture at the Augustine Institute Graduate School of Theology, where he teaches a course on the Theology of Suffering that gave rise to this new book. In our discussion today we will talk about whether and how God suffers, how Christians might suffer well, obstacles to suffering well, and the importance of confronting rather than perpetually running from death.Follow-up Resources:Suffering: What Every Catholic Should Know, by Mark GisczakSalvici Doloris, Apostolic Letter by John Paul II“The Mystery of Love and the Redemption of Suffering,” by Lorenzo Albacete, essay in Church Life JournalThis episode is sponsored by Saint Meinrad Seminary: Register for the Saint Meinrad Summer Chant Workshop and find other workshops, concerts, and programs at the Institute for Sacred Music by scrolling down under “Events” at www.saintmeinrad.edu/ism.Church Life Today is a partnership between the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame and OSV Podcasts from Our Sunday Visitor. Discover more ways to live, learn, and love your Catholic faith at osvpodcasts.com. Sharing stories, starting conversations.
Catholic Institute of Technology, with Bill and Alexis Haughey
Jan 15 2024
Catholic Institute of Technology, with Bill and Alexis Haughey
Born from a vision to fuse rapid scientific and technological advancement with the wisdom of the Catholic faith, Catholic Institute of Technology forms scientists, engineers and mathematicians who are dedicated to upholding the Catholic faith. This brand new university will welcome students for the first time in Fall 2024 to its campus in Castel Gandolfo, Italy. This university is the first-ever Catholic institution created exclusively for research advancements in the fields of the sciences, engineering, technology and mathematics, and is pursuing the elite title of an R1 school. The initial vision for CatholicTech was first conceptualized in the minds of Alexis and Bill Haughey, the husband-and-wife team whose own experience drove them to desire a new paradigm in academia where Catholic ethics thrive. Bill is an accomplished entrepreneur, and Alexis’ background is in academic research with an emphasis on technology, innovation, and entrepreneurship. They join us today, along with my colleague Brett Robinson, who is co-hosting this episode with me.Follow-up Resources:Learn more about Catholic Institute of Technology“How the Sciences Train You for Faith, Part 1, with Sofia Carozza,” podcast episode via Church Life Today“How the Sciences Train You for Faith, Part 2, with Sofia Carozza,” podcast episode via Church Life TodayThis episode is sponsored by the U.S. bishops' 9 Days for Life NovenaJoin the U.S. bishops’ pro-life novena from January 16 through January 24www.9daysforlife.comChurch Life Today is a partnership between the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame and OSV Podcasts from Our Sunday Visitor. Discover more ways to live, learn, and love your Catholic faith at osvpodcasts.com. Sharing stories, starting conversations.
The Joy and Danger of Christmas
Dec 21 2023
The Joy and Danger of Christmas
The question at Christmas is not about whether God will act for us. The babe born of Mary is the answer: God has given everything. The question is really about us. Will we receive Christ? This is a most magnificent reversal, and a most perilous one. He in whom all things are created––in whom we live and move and have our being––is given into our hands. The Host has become the guest, and we, who depend on God for all things, are called upon to become His host. Christmas is not only a time of great consolation, but the beginning of the great decision. God is all in: do we accept Him? Everything depends on our answer. In this special episode of our show, I will lead us through a series of reflections upon the mysteries of Christmas. These reflections were initially part of an article I wrote for Our Sunday Visitor, who is also, as you know, our podcasting partner here at Church Life Today. I don’t have a guest in studio with me today; instead, I hope that, together, we can welcome the Word of God as our guest, pondering the depth, beauty, and even the risk of God coming among us, in the flesh.Follow-up Resources:“The Joy of Christmas (and the danger),” article at Our Sunday Visitor by Leonard DeLorenzo“What it means to wait for the Lord,” article at Our Sunday Visitor by Leonard DeLorenzo“How the O Antiphons direct our gaze toward the coming of our Savior,” article at Our Sunday Visitor by Leonard DeLorenzo“The Three Wisemen,” podcast episode at Church Life JournalInto the Heart of the Father: Learning from and Giving Yourself through Christ in Prayer (Word Among Us, 2021), by Leonard DeLorenzoModel of Faith: Reflecting on the Litany of Saint Joseph (Our Sunday Visitor, 2022), by Leonard DeLorenzoA God Who Questions (Our Sunday Visitor, 2019), by Leonard DeLorenzoChurch Life Today is a partnership between the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame and OSV Podcasts from Our Sunday Visitor. Discover more ways to live, learn, and love your Catholic faith at osvpodcasts.com. Sharing stories, starting conversations.
Encountering Christ on Pilgrimage, with Joan Watson
Dec 4 2023
Encountering Christ on Pilgrimage, with Joan Watson
Sometimes you have to leave what’s familiar to discover what is most beautiful, most profound, and most meaningful precisely in your ordinary life. A pilgrimage is one of the best means for doing just that: departing from what you know in order to return anew. But pilgrimage is not just any kind of trip or travel, it is instead an intentional journey made to encounter Christ, or rather, to allow him to encounter you. Being open to that encounter can be hard work, it takes time and preparation and a willingness of spirit. Christ is always a courteous guest––he may confront you but he never forces his way into your life or into your heart. He waits for you to welcome him in. To be formed well for pilgrimage means, among other things, learning how to welcome Christ when he comes to you, learning how to seek him more willing, and learning how to love him who always loves you first. My guest today has dedicated herself to the ministry of helping form people for pilgrimages, which means that she is committed to helping others encounter Christ well. Joan Watson is Pilgrim Formation Manager for Verso Ministries, a Catholic pilgrimage company that specializes in not just the logistics of pilgrimage travel but also the spiritual and communal formation that makes encounters with Christ more meaningful and lasting. Joan came to Verso Ministries after years of serving the Church in catechetical and other formation ministries, as well as engaging in her own work as a speaker and writer who focuses on raising up saints in ordinary time. She joins me today to talk about the spirituality of pilgrimage, the forms of formation, and the transition from the extraordinary experiences abroad to enriching everyday life back home.  Follow-up Resources:●     Learn more about Verso Ministries at versoministries.com●     Listen to Joan Watson’s pilgrimage podcast, “In Via”, at https://versoministries.com/in-via/●     “By Sea and By Air: The Journey of the Gospel,” essay by Leonard DeLorenzo about pilgrimage in Church Life JournalChurch Life Today is a partnership between the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame and OSV Podcasts from Our Sunday Visitor. Discover more ways to live, learn, and love your Catholic faith at osvpodcasts.com. Sharing stories, starting conversations.
Eucharist Beliefs Among Adult Catholics, with Timothy O’Malley
Nov 20 2023
Eucharist Beliefs Among Adult Catholics, with Timothy O’Malley
What is the belief of ordinary Catholics around the Eucharist? That is a harder question to answer that it might at first seem. You could put forward two options and ask a respondent if they believe this or that. But it is not easy to phrase those options correctly, nor is it easy to ensure that your respondent understands what you are trying to ask. Belief in the Eucharist is not easy, and neither is asking about it.A new study commissioned by the McGrath Institute for Church Life and conducted by CARA at Georgetown University attempts to get closer to the real Eucharistic beliefs of ordinary Catholics. More precision was put into the questions and possible answers, an opportunity was given for open-ended responses, and sustained reflection on all the responses yielded some more textured findings than previous national studies produced. Today, I talk with my colleague, Dr. Tim O’Malley, about this new study, its findings and their significance for renewing Eucharistic belief in the Church. Tim published an article on this study in the Church Life Journal under the title“The Theological Foundations of Eucharistic Beliefs: A New National Study.”Follow-up Resources: ●     “Eucharist Beliefs: A National Survey of Adult Catholics,” study by CARA at Georgetown University, commissioned by the McGrath Institute for Church Life●     “The Theological Foundations of Eucharistic Beliefs: A New National Study”, article in Church Life Journal by Timothy O’MalleyChurch Life Today is a partnership between the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame and OSV Podcasts from Our Sunday Visitor. Discover more ways to live, learn, and love your Catholic faith at osvpodcasts.com. Sharing stories, starting conversations.
Social Media as a Conduit for Conflict, with Tim Weninger
Nov 6 2023
Social Media as a Conduit for Conflict, with Tim Weninger
Many of us browsing social media have had the experience of seeing horrendous images and videos from armed conflicts. Sometimes those dehumanizing acts are featured widely even before conflict fully breaks out. Seeing these things gives us a sense of rage or sorrow or concern or all of the above. It is not uncommon for our sympathies to be swayed by the suffering that we see, or the dehumanizing acts that are brought before us .Actually, that is often the point of showing these scenes and images in the first place.Computer science research shows that in the lead-up to hostilities, as well as after the outbreak of hostilities, there is a notable increase in dehumanizing political imagery that is often doctored or accentuated in some way and then reshared in digital space to evoke an emotional response. As media consumers, we may find ourselves swimming in a sea of images, not knowing what or whom we can trust. Or some of us might even focus in on the kinds of images and narratives that confirm our predetermined biases, and wed us more closely to our preferred group or tribe.My guest on the show today is a computer scientist whose research reveals how social media is regularly used as a conduit for conflict. Tim Weninger is the Frank M. Freimann Associate Professor of Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, where he also serves as the Director of Graduate Studies for Computer Science and Engineering. His research is in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and social media (and artificial intelligence on social media). Recently, Professor Weninger and his team have been studying how coordinated social media campaigns have been used to incite violence and discord, destabilize democratic processes, and disseminate propaganda. He is an advocate for increasing media literacy who recognizes the urgent need for moral formation for engaging and using media well. He joins me today to talk about his fascinating and important work, especially in light of recent world events.Follow-up Resources: ●      News and other information about Prof. Weninger and his work●      “ND Expert Tim Weninger: Using social media to dehumanize is part of the conflict playbook,” article in ND Works by Jessica Sieff●      “Media, Polarization, and the Gospel, with Deacon Matthew Kuna,” podcast episode via Church Life TodayChurch Life Today is a partnership between the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame and OSV Podcasts from Our Sunday Visitor. Discover more ways to live, learn, and love your Catholic faith at osvpodcasts.com. Sharing stories, starting conversations.
Grace for the Hard Days of Early Motherhood, with Jessica Mannen Kimmet
Oct 16 2023
Grace for the Hard Days of Early Motherhood, with Jessica Mannen Kimmet
Jessica Mannen Kimmet was searching for spiritual resources in the Church that would guide her and strengthen her during her early years of motherhood. She was experiencing significant struggles and was confronting unmet expectations. But other than a few scattered blog posts here and there, she really couldn’t find anything that would respond to her need and desire. So several years later, she wrote the book she was looking for, a book where the Word of God is brought close to the experiences of new mothers, and to many more of us besides.In her concluding chapter, she writes, “finding my way into motherhood has been a long, convoluted road. Progress through my pain was never as linear as I would have chosen. There were better days and worse days, improvements and relapses. There were moments of hope and energy, followed all too quickly by moments of anguish and despair. … [But] God makes all things new. Even me. Even you. God has the power to end all death and mourning and pain, and God promises to do so. In the meantime, God acknowledges our suffering and sits with us in it.”Jessica’s book is for those times in between, when there is suffering and struggle, and therefore the real need for hope and companionship. The book is called Groaning in Labor, Growing in Hope: Scripture Reflections for the Hard Days of Early Motherhood. As an early reader of this book myself, I can assure you that many other people besides those in early motherhood will benefit from this book, including men, whether single, married, fathers, or even priests.Follow up Resources:●     Groaning in Labor, Growing in Hope: Scripture Reflections for the Hard Days of Early Motherhood by Jessica Mannen Kimmet●     “Some Human Beings Carry Remnants of Other Human Beings in Their Bodies,” essay in Church Life Journal by Dr. Kristin Collier●     “The Theobiology of a Mother’s Voice,” essay in Church Life Journal by Dr. Kristin Collier●     “Forming Catholic Leaders for Mental Health, with Beth Hlabse,” podcast episode on Church Life Today Church Life Today is a partnership between the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame and OSV Podcasts from Our Sunday Visitor. Discover more ways to live, learn, and love your Catholic faith at osvpodcasts.com. Sharing stories, starting conversations.
The Ark and the Dove, with Edward Herrera
Oct 2 2023
The Ark and the Dove, with Edward Herrera
To love your neighbor, you must know your neighbor. And to know your neighbor, you often times have to go beyond the mind you have. The Greek word for conversion, metanoia, means just that: “to go beyond the mind you have”, so that loving your neighbor usually requires some kind of conversion. Conversions are often uncomfortable and even painful. It can be hard but it can also be liberating and healing to let go of what you assumed to be true so as to accept a little more of what is actually true, especially what has been and is actually true for someone else––namely, your neighbor.A new narrative podcast series called The Ark and the Dove seeks to allow listeners to grow in knowledge of their neighbors in the Catholic Church and in the United States. The way it does that is by investigating the complex dynamics of race and religion in America through the lens of the Black Catholic Church. It holds together both broad issues of race and religion with local, particular stories of specific communities, parishes, and schools, especially within the Archdiocese of Baltimore. Our episode today focuses on The Ark and the Dove, with my guest and the podcast’s co-creator, Edward Herrera.In addition to his work on The Ark and the Dove, Edward Herrera is the Executive Director of the Institute for Evangelization in the Archdiocese of Baltimore.Follow-up Resources:The Ark and the Dove podcast series“The Catholic Response to the Sin of Racism, with Gloria Purvis,” podcast episode via Church Life Today“Black Lives and the Preferential Option for the Poor” by John Cavadini, via Church Life JournalThis episode is sponsored by: Dr. Michael Dauphinais, https://catholic-theology-show.castos.com/Church Life Today is a partnership between the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame and OSV Podcasts from Our Sunday Visitor. Discover more ways to live, learn, and love your Catholic faith at osvpodcasts.com. Sharing stories, starting conversations.
Preparing for First Communion, Part 2: Passover and the Last Supper
Sep 18 2023
Preparing for First Communion, Part 2: Passover and the Last Supper
One of the surest ways to incite wonder and love for the Lord in our children is for us to rekindle wonder and love for the Lord in ourselves. As mature Christians, we have a responsibility to instruct our children––to model and share our faith with them. For many of us, this begins as a daunting and uncertain task: we might question our own faith, or feel awkward in our wording or mannerisms in sharing faith, or recognize our own lack of knowledge when it comes to Scripture or the particularities of Catholic doctrine. I felt all those things myself when it was time for me to begin forming my children to reverence our Eucharistic Lord and welcome him in the Blessed Sacrament. But starting some years ago, I took on this precious and challenging responsibility in a new way, when I began reading Scripture with my then six-year-old son to help him prepare for his First Communion. In particular, we read and wondered at 12 biblical episodes of God feeding his people: six from the Old Testament and six from the gospels, when Jesus fulfills what has been prefigured. From all our time spent together, including my son’s work in illustrating each of those 12 biblical scenes, I came to see that paying attention to these particular actions through Scripture created one firm, clear, and beautiful memory for my son, which was this: the Lord feeds his people. Even more, when he stepped forward to receive his First Communion in May of that year, he rejoiced at the wonder that now he himself was being fed by the Lord.I think this way of sacramental preparation is more important now than ever, especially as belief in the real presence of Jesus Christ in the Eucharist continues to wane among Catholics. In the Catholic Church in the U.S., we are hoping for a Eucharistic revival, and I want to think together about how to form our children better for First Communion, to set the best foundation for a sacramental, Eucharistic life. This is the second of two episodes where I share some of the teachings on the biblical episodes of God feeding his people. These teachings are drawn from my book Fed by the Lord: At-Home Scriptural Formation to Prepare Children for First Communion, from Liturgical Press. Fed by the Lord is written especially for parents, godparents, teachers, and catechists with two primary goals: first, to help enrich and renew the adults’ understanding of and wonder at the way in which God feeds his people throughout Scripture, and second, to offer guidance to adults as they seek to form their children and students for First Communion.In the last episode, I shared my teachings on one Old Testament episode and the corresponding Gospel episode that fulfills it. From 2 Kings 4, we focused on the prophet Elisha and the abundant bread, then from Mark 6 we contemplated Jesus feeding the five thousand. In this episode, I want to add two more: from the Old Testament, we will turn our attention to the Passover in Exodus, and then from Luke 22, the Institution of the Eucharist at the Last Supper. Follow-up Resources:●     Fed by the Lord: At-Home Scriptural Formation to Prepare Children for First Communion (Liturgical Press, 2023), by Leonard J. DeLorenzo●     Church Life Today is a partnership between the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame and OSV Podcasts from Our Sunday Visitor. Discover more ways to live, learn, and love your Catholic faith at osvpodcasts.com. Sharing stories, starting conversations.
Preparing for First Communion, Part 1: Abundant Bread and Feeding of the Five Thousand
Sep 4 2023
Preparing for First Communion, Part 1: Abundant Bread and Feeding of the Five Thousand
In a 2019 study, the Pew Research Center found that just one-third of U.S. Catholics Agree that the Eucharist is the Body and Blood of Christ. That is a sobering statistic. Even if we account for the way in which the survey question may have been imprecisely formed, it still seems that the overwhelming majority of Catholics surveyed espoused belief in a more symbolic meaning of the bread and wine on the altar, as opposed to the sacramental, real presence of Jesus Christ.The Eucharistic Revival in the United States seeks to respond to issues like this, to help increase both belief in and devotion to the Eucharist. One area that I have become especially attentive to is the formation of children for First Communion. Of all those Catholics who were surveyed and said that they believed only that the bread and wine of the altar were symbolic, most if not all of them had been formed for their First Communion and have likely received the Eucharist numerous times throughout their life. We could think that a Eucharistic Revival is about correcting and reforming the belief of adults, and enkindling their devotion, but I say that we ought to think deeply about Eucharistic formation from the very beginning, which means the period of preparation for First Communion.I am also interested in that issue because I am a parent, and four of my own children have been formed for First Communion, with two more to go. More than anything else, I want them to know and to believe that the love of God does not stay far away, but draws near. The love of God is near enough for us to touch, near enough to taste. The Eucharist is the love of God Incarnate, given for us: the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ.Follow-up Resources:●     Fed by the Lord: At-Home Scriptural Formation to Prepare Children for First Communion (Liturgical Press, 2023), by Leonard J. DeLorenzo●     Article on the 2019 Pew Study on U.S. Catholics belief in the EucharistSponsored link: The Catholic Theology ShowChurch Life Today is a partnership between the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame and OSV Podcasts from Our Sunday Visitor. Discover more ways to live, learn, and love your Catholic faith at osvpodcasts.com. Sharing stories, starting conversations.
Oppenheimer, with Ted Barron and Phil Sakimoto
Aug 21 2023
Oppenheimer, with Ted Barron and Phil Sakimoto
In 1965, in an NBC News documentary, J. Robert Oppenheimer reflected on his role in leading the Manhattan Project that yielded the first nuclear weapons by saying this:“We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed; a few people cried. Most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad Gita; Vishnu is trying to persuade the prince that he should do his duty, and to impress him, takes on his multiarmed form and says, ‘Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.’ I suppose we all thought that, one way or another.” The new blockbuster film, Oppenheimer, chronicles the race to develop the means of mass destruction, and focuses on the man who led that effort. We take up a discussion of the film in today’s show, and I welcome in two guests to join this discussion with me. Both my guests are from the Univresity of Notre Dame. Dr. Ted Barron is executive director of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center as well as the Judd and Mary Lou Leighton Director of Performing Arts; he also teaches in the Department of Film, Television, and Theater. Dr. Phil Sakimoto is one of my longtime collaborators on a science and religion planetarium project who has joined me on Church Life Today once before to talk about our presentation, “All Creation Gives Praise”. He is an astrophysicist, a professional astronomer, and the Director of the Minor in Sustainability at Notre Dame.Our episode today is produced in partnership with the Notre Dame Alumni Association, and specifically the FiresideND podcast from ThinkND, which brings the experience and expertise of Notre Dame to you, whenever, wherever. From STEM and art, to religion and health, FiresideND allows you to listen and learn with ND on the go. I want to thank our friends at ThinkND for bringing the idea for this episode to us and for helping it to come to fruition.Follow-up Resources:“All Creation Gives Praise, with Phil Sakimoto,” podcast episode via Church Life Today.“Oppenheimer and the Lesson of Fat Man,” journal article via Church Life JournalFiresideND podcast from ThinkNDChurch Life Today is a partnership between the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame and OSV Podcasts from Our Sunday Visitor. Discover more ways to live, learn, and love your Catholic faith at osvpodcasts.com. Sharing stories, starting conversations.