Doremi Teach

Helen Russell

If you’re interested in teaching musical skills and literacy through singing then this is the place for you. My name is Helen Russell from Doremi Connect and I’m going to help you achieve your goals using the Kodály approach. Whether you're a class teacher, music teacher, instrumental teacher or run a music club you will love to use these resources in your teaching. Helen is the founder of Doremi Connect, an online community for music teachers to develop their skills and connect with like-minded Kodály geeks. To connect with Helen and the Doremi community visit https://doremiconnect.co.uk/

Memorising Kodály Music & Piano Lesson Plans
Jun 23 2022
Memorising Kodály Music & Piano Lesson Plans
Do you memorise your lesson plans for piano lessons or music classes? When Doremi Members start using my detailed lesson plans, a frequently asked question is how do you remember what to do? It made me realise that so many of us feel we need to memorise our lesson plans and I reflected on my own journey, hang ups and misconceptions about memorisation. In this week’s podcast I share those reflections and why memorising your lesson plan isn’t necessarily desirable or achievable. Key Points: Why we feel the need to memorise Why it can cause problems How to avoid the need to memorise The benefits on not hiding your plans A sneaky peek at one of the Doremi Teach lesson plans If you’d like to see my lesson plans for teaching piano or classroom music using the Kodály Approach then you need to check out Doremi Membership. Doremi Members get access to my classroom music curriculum, including video walkthroughs, downloadable lesson plans and resources and access to my live coaching and Q&A calls and online community. If it’s piano you’re after, you can become a Doremi Teach Piano member and get all that plus my Doremi Teach Piano curriculum. Again, lesson plans, resources and walkthroughs. There are teachers just like you already in the community ready to support you and share your questions, successes and stories. So come and join us at (doremiconnect.co.uk/music) or if you’re a piano teacher (doremiconnect.co.uk/piano)
How to start planning your Kodály Music Curriculum
Jun 2 2022
How to start planning your Kodály Music Curriculum
Do you want or need to create a singing based curriculum for your school, class or club? Maybe you’ve done some Kodály training but have been left highly motivated but not quite knowing where to start. In today’s episode we’re going to walk you through some of the first planning tasks you’ll need to do to create your own Kodály curriculum For more advice and support for teaching class music or piano using the Kodály approach visit ( points: Good high level objectives for beginner musicians have the following seven qualities 1 - are a single musical element 2 - exist in all music 3 - are really specific 4 - can be easily explained 5 - have clearly defined prerequisites or none 6 - have a clear path to the next step 7 - exist alongside the practice and preparation of other objectives Starting with a massive list of possible contenders, Helen will help you narrow them down to the key objectives for your curriculum. Do you want more support with your Kodály curriculum? Why not join me inside Doremi Membership? It's where I hang out all the time supporting my members and sharing all my best stuff, including my own detailed Kodály curriculum and all the lesson plans and resources you need to deliver the best quality music lessons to your students. ( Helen's starting list of objective contenders - you can add to them if you can! Beat, rhythm, scales, pitch, high, low, clefs, crotchets, quavers, key signatures, texture, timbre, phrasing, form, time signatures, Italian terms, swing, harmony, chords, ostinato, singing, instruments, forte, loud, piano, soft, crescendo, repeats, composition, improvisation, sight reading, unison, polyphony, composers, classical music, folk music, playground songs, listening, jazz, bars, bar lines, modulation, orchestra, opera, musicals, pop music, ukuleles, keyboard, percussion, duets, tempo, sharps, flats, major, minor, syncopation
Becoming a Triple Threat
Feb 17 2022
Becoming a Triple Threat
Welcome to Episode 21 of the Doremi Teach podcast. Today we're going to chat about aural skills and how you can help your students, and yourself, become a triple threat. My name is Helen Russell from Doremi Connect and I’m going to help you achieve your goals using the Kodály approach. So if you’re interested in teaching musical skills and literacy through singing then this is the place for you. A few years ago I was called up by the mum of a desperate Grade 8 cellist. Their exam was in a few weeks and their teacher hadn’t covered the aural element AT ALL. Could I help? Sadly, I was fully booked and the idea of missing family-time to cram some poor kid for Grade 8 was not appealing. So I pointed them to some books and online resources and wished them well. All the time cursing their teacher in my thinking voice. It broke my heart. I wish I could tell you that this was an isolated incident but it was not. But it was probably the worst. I have helped students with their aural when given more time. But their teachers are seriously missing a trick. Aural skills are precious and essential. Far more valuable than the few marks in an instrumental exam. And they deserve more attention too! When you think about learning an instrument, it feels like learners are split into three types. #1 Playing by Rote Whenever I have a beginner student who’s older than 5 or 6 they can usually play something already. And it’s almost always taught by their cousin. I ponder on this cousin link a lot and have some theories - but I’ll save those for another time. Rote teaching is great. Even in a formal lesson we can teach patterns and techniques by rote. But with YouTube and other online apps, learning purely by rote is increasingly common. #2 Playing by Ear Growing up I was sooo jealous of those people who could play by ear. Possibly because they were accessing cool pop music in a way that was off limits for me and my “proper” piano lessons. They were so cool - sigh! I was mystified and thought it would always be out of my reach. Spoiler: It’s not! #3 Classically Trained We’re always hearing that some pop star or other was “classically trained”. Really that just means they had a piano teacher, some piano books, diligently practised their scales and possibly did some grade exams. This was me. Apart from the diligently practising their scales bit! Ahem! Learning to read from the score but also becoming beholden to it. Unable to play without. Apart from when my cousin taught me Tomorrow from Annie by rote - hang on - full circle!! The Triple Threat Imagine if you could do ALL THREE of these things?! You’d be, what’s known in showbiz, a TRIPLE THREAT! And who doesn’t want that - for their students and for themselves! And the secret? Aural skills. Which of the three types of learners do you most associate with? I’ll be fascinated to see if there’s a pattern? So what do we know? #1 Aural skills are essential, desirable and hugely valuable. They deserve more than a "exam prep" after-thought. #2 We can teach our students to become a triple threat by combining the three types of teaching and learning. #2b It’s not too late to get that for ourselves too! Happy Birthday Have you had a student try and pick out Happy Birthday on their instrument? It’s actually really hard! It’s especially frustrating when they don’t have pitch awareness. Jabbing randomly at the keys seeking that elusive next note. When the pitch goes higher they still test notes that are lower. Sure it’s hard to nail the EXACT interval, but they are so much more successful when they slow down, think about the direction and then move the right way. #microstepsalert When they can hear the pitch changing, by singing or inner hearing then it’s a joy. Even better - make sure they’ve worked with much simpler melodies from their very first lesson. Gosh it’s easier to play by ear when there’s only two notes! Do you know what? Teaching aural skills to all...
No Robbers
Feb 10 2022
No Robbers
Welcome to Episode 20 of the Doremi Teach podcast. Today I'm going to teach you a song that's really useful for developing pulse or steady beat. No Robbers No robbers out today No robbers out today We are singing on our way No robbers out today Hello there and welcome to the Doremi Teach podcast. If you’re interested in teaching musical skills and literacy through singing then this is the place for you. My name is Helen Russell from Doremi Connect and I’m going to help you achieve your goals using the Kodály approach. Benefits of No Robbers This song is really useful for developing pulse or steady beat· The game involves marching so the pulse is experienced kinaesthetically The rhythm is simple, ta and titi or crotchets and quavers, so it’s a great song for working on rhythm later The toneset is mi–so with a range of a Minor 3rd so ideal for little voices and for reluctant teachers Its so-mi motif is the easiest for beginner singers to pitch accurately because it is used naturally in playgrounds all over the world, ner-ner ner-ner It’s ideal for teaching the piano as we can play on any two black keys a skip apart It’s easy to transfer to tuned percussion – just find a minor third like D with F, E with G, A with C or B with D I also use it to experience forte, the loud dynamic The Game The game is super simple. It’s just marching around the room singing. However before you start, remember small children will march faster than adults. We want the march to match the beat so you’ll need to sing faster than you would on your own. A top tip if you’re not sure how fast to sing is to ask a student to march first, then join in with their tempo. I also like using untuned percussion to mark the beat aurally while you all march and sing. This is not a lullaby, so sing loudly forte but remind the children that doesn’t mean shouting! Make sure you let us know what you think of the episode and do share it with your colleagues if you’ve found it helpful For more free resources and webinars on teaching music through singing make sure you visit (doremiconnect.co.uk) and sign up to our daily emails. I hope you have a lovely week, filled with music and singing. You’ve been listening to the Doremi Teach podcast with Helen Russell from Doremi Connect. Helping you achieve your music teaching goals with the Kodály approach. Mentioned in this episode: null null
Good Night
Feb 3 2022
Good Night
Welcome to Episode 19 of the Doremi Teach podcast. Today I'm going to teach you a song that's useful for experiencing soft singing, piano, since it's a lullaby. Good Night Good night, sleep tight Friends will come tomorrow night Hello there and welcome to the Doremi Teach podcast. If you’re interested in teaching musical skills and literacy through singing then this is the place for you. My name is Helen Russell from Doremi Connect and I’m going to help you achieve your goals using the Kodály approach. Benefits of Good Night This song is really useful for experiencing soft singing, piano since it’s a lullaby The rhythm is simple, ta and titi or crotchets and quavers, so it’s a great song for working on rhythm later The toneset is mi–so with a range of a Minor 3rd so ideal for little voices and for reluctant teachers Its so-mi motif is the easiest for beginner singers to pitch accurately because it is used naturally in playgrounds all over the world, ner-ner ner-ner It’s ideal for teaching the piano as we can play on any two black keys a skip apart It’s easy to transfer to tuned percussion – just find a minor third like D with F, E with G, A with C or B with D Later iterations of the game involve rocking the baby to experience the beat kinaesthetically The Game All the students lie on the floor for a pretend sleep while the teacher softly sings the song. After each repetition, say “It’s morning, wake up!” and the students must stand up and have a stretch. Then “Bedtime, back to sleep” and they lie down while you sing again. They find this very amusing! In the future, to practise beat, you can rock the baby to the beat. No baby wants to be rocked to the rhythm if they are supposed to be going to sleep! Later, while rocking, you could clap the rhythm. For some students this is an easier microstep towards performing beat and rhythm simultaneously. When you sing, make sure you sing softly, piano, so you don’t wake the baby. Remember that soft singing is not the same as whispering. Make sure you let us know what you think of the episode and do share it with your colleagues if you’ve found it helpful For more free resources and webinars on teaching music through singing make sure you visit (doremiconnect.co.uk) and sign up to our daily emails. I hope you have a lovely week, filled with music and singing. You’ve been listening to the Doremi Teach podcast with Helen Russell from Doremi Connect. Helping you achieve your music teaching goals with the Kodály approach. Mentioned in this episode: null null
See Saw
Jan 27 2022
See Saw
Welcome to Episode 18 of the Doremi Teach podcast. Today I'm going to teach you a song that's perfect for preparing steady beat and pitch and I use it to present rhythm. See Saw See saw up and down In the air and on the ground Hello there and welcome to the Doremi Teach podcast. If you’re interested in teaching musical skills and literacy through singing then this is the place for you. My name is Helen Russell from Doremi Connect and I’m going to help you achieve your goals using the Kodály approach. Benefits of See Saw This song is used to prepare pulse and pitch and I use it to present rhythm The toneset is mi-so with a range of a Minor 3rd so ideal for little voices and for nervous teachers It uses the so-mi motif, which is the easiest for beginner singers to pitch accurately because it is used naturally in playgrounds all over the world, ner-ner ner-ner It’s ideal for teaching the piano as we can play on any two black keys a skip apart It’s easy to transfer to tuned percussion – just find a minor third like D with F, E with G, A with C or B with D The game involves performing a rocking pulse action that stops at the end of the song so the pulse is experienced kinaesthetically The rhythm is very simple, just using ta and titi or crotchets and quavers so this will reappear throughout the curriculum as we prepare and present rhythm The Game Hold both arms outstretched to the sides to represent the seesaw. Then rock to the beat just like a seesaw. Our seesaw is very musical. It only rocks when we sing. Spark their imagination by asking who they would like to put on the seesaw. Sometimes they choose their friends, siblings, sometimes cartoon characters or toys. The trick with this game is to freeze at the end of the song. The beat stops, the seesaw stops and the students must hold their position until we sing again. As an adult, it doesn’t sound very interesting, but the students love it and will play over and over! Make sure you let us know what you think of the episode and do share it with your colleagues if you’ve found it helpful For more free resources and webinars on teaching music through singing make sure you visit (doremiconnect.co.uk) and sign up to our daily emails. I hope you have a lovely week, filled with music and singing. You’ve been listening to the Doremi Teach podcast with Helen Russell from Doremi Connect. Helping you achieve your music teaching goals with the Kodály approach. Mentioned in this episode: null null
Queen Queen Caroline
Jan 20 2022
Queen Queen Caroline
Welcome to Episode 17 of the Doremi Teach podcast. Today I'm going to teach you a fun rhyme that develops a sense of pulse or steady beat. Queen Queen Caroline Queen Queen Caroline Washed her hair in turpentine Turpentine made it shine Queen Queen Caroline Hello there and welcome to the Doremi Teach podcast. If you’re interested in teaching musical skills and literacy through singing then this is the place for you. My name is Helen Russell from Doremi Connect and I’m going to help you achieve your goals using the Kodály approach. Benefits of Queen Queen Caroline Develops pulse or steady beat kinaesthetically It’s use of the speaking voice also makes it very attractive for teachers who aren’t yet confident using their own singing voices in the classroom The actions change each phrase to help prepare our students for phrase analysis The rhythm is really simple, just using ta and titi. It’s not the best choice for presenting rhythm because the longer words are spread across two beats but it’s great for practising. They learn a new word turpentine but make sure they know NOT to put it in their hair! The Game Use a different pulse or beat action for each phrase “Queen Queen Caroline” – mime putting on a crown four times “Washed her hair in turpentine” – mime shampooing your hair “Turpentine made it shine” – stroke your hair four times “Queen Queen Caroline” – mime putting a crown on four times Make sure you let us know what you think of the episode and do share it with your colleagues if you’ve found it helpful For more free resources and webinars on teaching music through singing make sure you visit (doremiconnect.co.uk) and sign up to our daily emails. I hope you have a lovely week, filled with music and singing. You’ve been listening to the Doremi Teach podcast with Helen Russell from Doremi Connect. Helping you achieve your music teaching goals with the Kodály approach. Mentioned in this episode: null null
Tick Tock
Jan 13 2022
Tick Tock
Welcome to Episode 16 of the Doremi Teach podcast. Today I'm going to teach you a song that's perfect for preparing steady beat and dynamics, loud and soft. Tick Tock Tick, tock, tick, tock, goes my little clock All day long it just goes tick tock Hello there and welcome to the Doremi Teach podcast. If you’re interested in teaching musical skills and literacy through singing then this is the place for you. My name is Helen Russell from Doremi Connect and I’m going to help you achieve your goals using the Kodály approach. Benefits of Tick Tock This song is used to prepare beat and dynamics (loud and soft) The toneset is mi-so-la with a range of a Perfect 4th so ideal for little voices and for nervous teachers It uses the so-mi motif, which is the easiest for beginner singers to pitch, and the so-la-so-mi motif It’s ideal for teaching the piano as we can play on black keys, where the high hand will bounce between so and la Easy to transfer to tuned percussion The rhythm is very simple, just using ta (crotchets) with a single titi (quavers) for “little” so it’s easy to sing but I don’t use it for working on rhythm skills With the tick tock motif, it’s a great way to prepare two-time or duple metre and time signatures later on The Game Make a tick tock sound and make a waving action pivoting at the elbow, like a metronome or upside-down pendulum. Keep that going while you sing the song Prepare for work on dynamics (loud and soft) by singing softly when it’s a little clock. Then sing again as a big clock, louder. You can explore the size-dynamic connection with tiny clock and massive clock. Anything you like – be inventive and most importantly get the students involved with the creativity. Make sure you let us know what you think of the episode and do share it with your colleagues if you’ve found it helpful For more free resources and webinars on teaching music through singing make sure you visit (doremiconnect.co.uk) and sign up to our daily emails. I hope you have a lovely week, filled with music and singing. You’ve been listening to the Doremi Teach podcast with Helen Russell from Doremi Connect. Helping you achieve your music teaching goals with the Kodály approach. Mentioned in this episode: null null
Cuckoo
Jan 6 2022
Cuckoo
Welcome to Episode 15 of the Doremi Teach podcast. Today I'm going to teach you a song that's perfect for preparing pitch and introducing part work. Cuckoo Cuckoo, where are you? Here I am, I see you! Hello there and welcome to the Doremi Teach podcast. If you’re interested in teaching musical skills and literacy through singing then this is the place for you. My name is Helen Russell from Doremi Connect and I’m going to help you achieve your goals using the Kodály approach. Benefits of Cuckoo This song is used to prepare pitch and introduce part work with Question and Answer The toneset is mi-so with a range of a Minor 3rd so ideal for little voices and for nervous teachers It uses the so-mi motif, which is the easiest for beginner singers to pitch accurately because it is used naturally in playgrounds all over the world, ner-ner ner-ner It’s ideal for teaching the piano as we can play on any two black keys a skip apart It’s easy to transfer to tuned percussion – just find a minor third like D with F, E with G, A with C or B with D The game involves solo singing The rhythm is very simple, just using ta and titi or crotchets and quavers so this will reappear throughout the curriculum as we prepare and present rhythm The Game There are two characters in this song. The cuckoo, who is hiding, and someone looking for the cuckoo. Once the song is known well you can choose two students to sing the two parts. One is the guesser, who sings the question and is looking for the cuckoo. They must keep their eyes closed. The other is chosen secretly, and is the cuckoo. They will sing the solo. The guesser sings the opening question, either as a solo or with the class, and then has to identify the cuckoo just from the sound, and direction, of their voice. I like to use a bird finger puppet to select the cuckoo. They then hold it behind their backs. This way it’s really clear who the cuckoo is, and the other students must stay quiet. Top tip: the answer phrase for this song has a tricky turn of phrase, so make sure the students get plenty of opportunities to listen to it before you ask them to sing. I do this by letting them sing the question while I sing the answer and hide the cuckoo puppet. Make sure you let us know what you think of the episode and do share it with your colleagues if you’ve found it helpful For more free resources and webinars on teaching music through singing make sure you visit (doremiconnect.co.uk) and sign up to our daily emails. I hope you have a lovely week, filled with music and singing. You’ve been listening to the Doremi Teach podcast with Helen Russell from Doremi Connect. Helping you achieve your music teaching goals with the Kodály approach. Mentioned in this episode: null null
Listen Listen
Dec 30 2021
Listen Listen
Welcome to Episode 14 of the Doremi Teach podcast. Today I'm going to teach you a song that's great for performing and listening to a steady beat using a hand drum. Listen Listen Listen, listen, here I come How many beats upon my drum? Benefits of Listen Listen This song is used to prepare pulse with a drum or other untuned percussion The toneset is do-re-mi-so with a range of a Perfect 5th so good for little voices and for nervous teachers It starts with the so-mi motif, which is easy for beginner singers to pitch accurately It also contains so-mi-re-do so can be used later on when practising mi-re-do motifs The rhythm is mostly simple but includes ti-tika, which is a more advanced rhythm so I wouldn’t use this for rhythm work initially The fun game involves counting and taking turns with an untuned percussion instrument The Game This is a very simple game. You sing the song, and then tap a steady beat on hand drum or other untuned percussion instrument. The students must count how many beats you played on your drum. It’s tempting to tap throughout the song, but it’s better to wait until the end so it’s clear how many beats they are expected to count. Start with four beats and then vary, but don’t do too many or they will lose count You can give the drum to a student to tap – remember the beat is steady and even. Alternative Game: Listen, listen, here I come Someone special gets the drum The game for this involves one student tapping the drum throughout the song, then choosing another special person to take a turn. You could pass the drum around the circle while you sing again, and that would select your next drummer. Make sure you let us know what you think of the episode and do share it with your colleagues if you’ve found it helpful For more free resources and webinars on teaching music through singing make sure you visit (doremiconnect.co.uk) and sign up to our daily emails. I hope you have a lovely week, filled with music and singing. You’ve been listening to the Doremi Teach podcast with Helen Russell from Doremi Connect. Helping you achieve your music teaching goals with the Kodály approach. Mentioned in this episode: null null
Copy Cat
Dec 23 2021
Copy Cat
Welcome to Episode 13 of the Doremi Teach podcast. Today I'm going to teach you a song that's perfect for preparing pulse and rhythm. Copy Cat Copy cat, copy cat Sitting on the door mat Hello there and welcome to the Doremi Teach podcast. If you’re interested in teaching musical skills and literacy through singing then this is the place for you. My name is Helen Russell from Doremi Connect and I’m going to help you achieve your goals using the Kodály approach. Benefits of Copy Cat This song is used to prepare pulse or rhythm, and taking turns The toneset is mi-so-la with a range of a Perfect 4th so ideal for little voices and for nervous teachers It uses the so-mi-la-so-mi motif, which is easy for beginner singers to pitch accurately because it is used naturally in playgrounds all over the world, ner-ner-na-ner-ner The rhythm is very simple, just using ta and titi or crotchets and quavers so this will reappear throughout the curriculum as we prepare and present rhythm The game involves solo singing and improvising actions It’s great to get your students moving around and the actions can be as energetic as you want I also include this in my piano curriculum The Game The game for this varies as the curriculum progresses Level 1: A simple copy cat game The teacher sings the song while doing a pulse action, and the students copy. It’s not so simple though, because the students must only sing and do the action when it’s their turn. When the teacher is singing the students must stand still and silent. This is actually way harder than you’d think, and is a great way to practise patience and turn taking. An extension to this is to get the students to choose the pulse action. They can either lead the game by singing the solo, or “gift” their idea to the teacher or a friend. Remember to make your pulse actions large so the students don’t accidentally slip onto the rhythm. Level 2: Simon Says Once you have completed Doremi Teach: Music module RedB and have presented the concept of steady beat you can expand on the game. The students ONLY copy if your actions show the steady beat. If they show something else (use the rhythm of the song but don’t tell them that!) then they must stand still and no sing. Level 3: Rhythm Actions Once you’ve presented the concept of rhythm, you can change the rules so they ONLY copy if your actions show the rhythm. Make sure you let us know what you think of the episode and do share it with your colleagues if you’ve found it helpful For more free resources and webinars on teaching music through singing make sure you visit (doremiconnect.co.uk) and sign up to our daily emails. I hope you have a lovely week, filled with music and singing. You’ve been listening to the Doremi Teach podcast with Helen Russell from Doremi Connect. Helping you achieve your music teaching goals with the Kodály approach. Mentioned in this episode: null null
Lemonade (Here I Come)
Dec 16 2021
Lemonade (Here I Come)
Welcome to Episode 12 of the Doremi Teach podcast. Today I'm going to teach you a song that's used to prepare pitch and introduce part work with question and answer Lemonade Soloist – Here I come Class – Where from? Soloist – Worcester Class – What’s your trade? Soloist – Lemonade Class – Bring us some don’t be afraid Hello there and welcome to the Doremi Teach podcast. If you’re interested in teaching musical skills and literacy through singing then this is the place for you. My name is Helen Russell from Doremi Connect and I’m going to help you achieve your goals using the Kodály approach. Benefits of Lemonade This song is used to prepare pitch and introduce part work with Question and Answer The toneset is mi-so with a range of a Minor 3rd so ideal for little voices and for nervous teachers It uses the so-mi motif, which is the easiest for beginner singers to pitch accurately because it is used naturally in playgrounds all over the world, ner-ner ner-ner It’s easy to transfer to tuned percussion – just find a minor third like D with F, E with G, A with C or B with D The rhythm is very simple, just using ta and titi or crotchets and quavers, so again, easy to sing The game involves solo singing The Game There are two parts to this song. The class and the soloist, or the lemonade seller. Once the song is known well you can choose a student to be the soloist The students stand in a circle, with the soloist in the middle. At the end, the students hold out their cupped hands and the soloist chooses one student and “pours” the lemonade into their cup. This student is now the new soloist and they swap places. This song is a challenge for the soloist as they must sing first rather than respond, which is more usual. You can sing “Off you go” on the starting pitch to help the soloist get started if they are reluctant. Watch out for the soloists changing the starting pitch of the song. The class should match pitch with the soloist. To create variety and develop improvisational skills, the students can change the name of the location and the type of drink. But they need to make sure their new choice fits the song so as a stepping stone to complete improvisation you can discuss some choices they could make that would fit. For example cherryade and orangeade will both work. Coca cola is popular but doesn’t rhyme, so you can decide if that matters and whether it’s a good talking point. Make sure you let us know what you think of the episode and do share it with your colleagues if you’ve found it helpful For more free resources and webinars on teaching music through singing make sure you visit (doremiconnect.co.uk) and sign up to our daily emails. I hope you have a lovely week, filled with music and singing. You’ve been listening to the Doremi Teach podcast with Helen Russell from Doremi Connect. Helping you achieve your music teaching goals with the Kodály approach. Mentioned in this episode: null null
Behind the scenes of Helen's first music lesson
Dec 9 2021
Behind the scenes of Helen's first music lesson
It's Episode 11 and I'm going to give you a sneaky peek behind the scenes of the first lesson with my youngest beginners. Hello there and welcome to the Doremi Teach podcast. If you’re interested in teaching musical skills and literacy through singing then this is the place for you. My name is Helen Russell from Doremi Connect and I’m going to help you achieve your goals using the Kodály approach. I'll admit, I'm a bit nosy. And I bet you are too! That's why this episode I'm going to share the audio from the video walkthrough of the very first lesson in Doremi Teach: Music. Over the last ten episodes I've shared songs and rhymes to use at this level, but this is a full walkthrough showing how to bring all of those together into a coherent lesson. It's a demonstration, interspersed with tips and explanations. My Doremi Teach members get access to the video version, which is helpful when the songs have actions. They also get the downloadable lesson plans and resources. So let's get started on our first module, exploring voice types. Main Objective: to experience different voice types Plus we’ll be introducing most of the songs we’ll be using this term. Hello Everyone Balloons We Are Dancing in the Forest Engine Engine Zoom Zoom Zoom Chop Chop Choppity Chop Jelly on a Plate Over in the Meadow Make sure you let us know what you think of the episode and do share it with your colleagues if you’ve found it helpful For more free resources and webinars on teaching music through singing make sure you visit (doremiconnect.co.uk) and sign up to our daily emails. I hope you have a lovely week, filled with music and singing. You’ve been listening to the Doremi Teach podcast with Helen Russell from Doremi Connect. Helping you achieve your music teaching goals with the Kodály approach. Mentioned in this episode: null null