Suicide Zen Forgiveness

Elaine Lindsay

Lost a dear friend to suicide at 16, did not know what a lesson it would become. Now, at 67, I continue to appreciate the Best/Worst Gift from Andrea that keeps me living! #Chooselife read less

Derick Fage TV Host TEDx Speaker  S4 E4
4d ago
Derick Fage TV Host TEDx Speaker S4 E4
Meet Derick Fage Derick is the host of Daytime Ottawa on Rogers TV and you can often hear him on CityNews Ottawa discussing local, provincial and national issues. Over his 18-year television career, Derick has demonstrated an amazing ability to connect with people, young and old. Derick is authentic and isn’t afraid to be vulnerable, which is something guests and viewers have grown to appreciate over the years.   In 2012, Derick was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for his community work and contributions to charitable organizations. He received this award well before going public with his personal struggle of living with chronic fecal incontinence since birth. Following his public admission, he accepted the role of ambassador for the Canadian Continence Foundation in the hopes of helping others who are living with any number of challenges. Derick is also the president of the foundation.  Derick has given inspirational and impactful talks, including his powerful TEDx Talk based on themes of; living with an invisible medical condition, bullying, living with mental illness, isolation, living life to its fullest, human connection, building meaningful relationships, the benefits of being authentic and the importance of being kind to one another. Derick’s Links Please View Derick's TEDx Talk on my Relentless Pursuit of Happiness: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-B4gEktREc&t=50s  Host, Daytime Ottawa on Rogers TV https://www.rogerstv.com/show?lid=12&rid=4&sid=68  Media Personality, Host, MC, Professional Speaker, TEDx Speaker, Live Auctioneer President and Ambassador, The Canadian Continence Foundation:  https://www.canadiancontinence.ca/EN/ E-mail: derick.r.fage@gmail.com  Cell: 613-986-5124 Website: http://www.derickfage.com/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/derick.fage  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/derick.fage/?hl=en
Andy Grant Host Real Men Feel S4 E3
Jan 24 2023
Andy Grant Host Real Men Feel S4 E3
Andy Grant has been helping people for over a decade as a best-selling author, award-winning speaker, Transformational Energy Coach, Healer, suicide prevention activist, and host of the Real Men Feel podcast. He holds certificates in Positive Psychology, the Enwaken Coaching System, Akashic Records, Life Activation, and other leadership programs and energy work modalities.   Known as the King of Authenticity, Andy is the founder of Real Men Feel, a movement encouraging men to come out of the emotional closet. Andy has been producing and hosting the Real Men Feel podcast since February of 2016.   As a survivor of multiple suicide attempts, Andy knows how low we as human beings can feel, and he is committed to helping people realize how magnificent life is meant to be. His Amazon best-seller, Still Here: How to Succeed in Life After Failing at Suicide, has helped people around the globe and includes everything he wished he knew at a younger age. Andy is also a facilitator at MensGroup.com, a contributor at GoodMenProject.com, and an initiate of the Modern Mystery School.   Learn more at TheAndyGrant.com   Explore working together with a complimentary Clarity Call. You'll get clear on what you want, what's in your way, and what you can do about it. Visit TheAndyGrant.com/talk.   Social Links Connect with Andy on Facebook: facebook.com/AndyGrantLoveYourLife/ facebook.com/afgrant facebook.com/realmenfeelshow Twitter:  https://twitter.com/NavitasCoaching https://twitter.com/RealMenFeelOrg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/andy_grant/ https://www.instagram.com/realmenfeelshow/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewfgrant/   See all of Andy's books https://amazon.com/author/andygrant   Real Men Feel Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/real-men-feel/id1107137758 Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/78U5M6iDR2QWkPUl6Ch62c YouTube https://www.YouTube.com/realmenfeel
Katie Thornton MSW, LCSW  Loss of her Father S4 E2
Jan 17 2023
Katie Thornton MSW, LCSW Loss of her Father S4 E2
Katie Thornton MSW, LCSW My guest is Katie Thornton, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and EMDR trained therapist, licensed in Colorado, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Maine, North Dakota, Texas, Nevada, and Wyoming.   Katie has extensive experience working with individuals, families, and groups through a variety of challenging circumstances. Katie believes that change happens when people are given the support they need to draw on their strengths and realize their potential to live fulfilling and happy lives.   Katie provides both counseling and assessment services for children, adolescents, adults, and veterans. She approaches both services as healing processes, helping answer deep-seated questions that individuals might have. With a passion for supporting neurodiversity, Katie provides an environment of compassion and support to help individuals and families learn and thrive. Get in Touch with Katie support@katietlcsw.com Facebook - Connect Instagram Follow LinkedIn - Connect Twitter Follow oMD7YoqVSzcNgl4SvxWC Transcript [00:00:00] Elaine Lindsay: And it's good to be here once again. So, uh, without further ado, I'm going to go ahead and bring Katie up on stage. Hello? Hello. Hi, uh, again. I will say thank you very much for joining me on the show. It's always, difficult to start the show in a positive way because we are often talking about things that are painful. Mm-hmm. and, , I, I'm going to let you. Tell your story starting where you will. Mm-hmm. . Cause I think that's really important and you can, you can go ahead and I'll pop in when it's appropriate. Okay. Okay. [00:00:54] Katie Thornton: So my name's Katie. I am here because I lost my dad to [00:01:00] suicide. I was a freshman in high. So we're actually coming up on 20 years this year in March. So it's kind of like a big milestone moment, I guess. But yeah, I did lose my dad back in March of 2023, or sorry, 20 of oh three. So 20 years ago, March 18th. . It's been a, a rough road, but I think I'm kind of in this place now and it took me a lot of, a lot of work and a lot of time where I'm like in this post-traumatic growth stage where for the longest time it kind of shaped who I was, but not in a positive way. I'm from a very small town, so everyone in my town knew me and knew my family, and knew my dad. They knew what happened. . So it kind of became my identity in high school. But it's not the identity that I wanted to live my life as, so I [00:02:00] worked really hard and it, it was a journey , that's for sure. Where there are times that I maybe looks like I was kind of like running away from the situation to create my, my new identity of whatever my identity was outside of that girl that lost her dad to suicide. but I think that I found her over time, . And going through it defined me in a negative way to like, it has shaped me and it has motivated me and pushed me to where I am and who I am today. So I am a licensed therapist now, and I have no doubt that that's why I'm in the path that I'm went on. I developed like this sense of travel and adventure, which I. is also part of what, I don't know, it was like part of my journey of discovering myself and who I was, cuz I would go and travel out on my own. So it was just me and my thoughts and my myself [00:03:00] of figuring out who I was. So I think it helped, it helped me to figure out who, who Katie truly is. Like just Katie by herself, who is she? And I think that that helped me a lot. . Well, I, I have to interject there because just that like, I hope you give yourself enough credit or how, how together that was mm-hmm. , because as a teenager , we don't always react to things really well and, and smaller, much smaller things than, than losing your dad. [00:03:40] Elaine Lindsay: Right. It, it had to be very difficult, especially in a small town because everybody does know what's going on with everyone else. Yep. Are you an only child? [00:03:51] Katie Thornton: No, I have a younger brother. He is three years younger than me, so it's the two of. , we have very different lives. . You would think that we have [00:04:00] different parents and grew up in different houses, but yep. Here we are. Same parents, same house . Yeah. It's, it's funny how we can be that different. My sister was five years younger than me. Mm-hmm. and chalk and cheese . Other, other than, you know, the family ResSem. We were absolutely nothing alike, . But how old were you when you first traveled on your own? I was, it was after college, after my undergrad. So I went to college at 18 and I intentionally picked a university where basically no one from my high school was going. I think two people from my class went. , I mean, isn't that many? So I was like, okay, I'm fine with that. So I intentionally picked a college that no one else was going to, so no one else would know me. I ended up transferring two years in and I [00:05:00] ended up transferring to the school that most of my high school went to . But it's, I mean, it's a large school. It's, it's Ohio State, so it's a large school, so Oh, yeah. I saw plenty of people from high school, but I also made a lot of connections outside of my high school. So it was good. And then I graduated from college in 2010, and then in 2012 I moved to Korea and I lived there for two years. , and that's where like my traveling really started is any long weekend or any break that I had from work, I would go to another country. And then when my, I did that for the two years, so 2014 I was working on my master's and I had to come home for my internship basically. But instead of coming straight home, I took the long way around and traveled around Southeast Asia and traveled Oh wow. For like three months. I got back in 2014, but I did three months of traveling at that time. Oh, wow. Were [00:06:00] you an adventurous child? I think it's always been in me. I like to, I, I mean, I grew up camping and sailing and all of that with my, my dad was a sailor, so that's what we would do all summer. Every summer was go to the lake and we would camp and we would, would sail or get, we had a power boat too, so we did those. As a kid our traveling as children always kind of revolved around my dad's sailing. Ah, okay. So it's not like we did a lot of international travel or anything like that. So it was around either sailing or soccer cuz I played soccer. So Uhhuh it was that. So I think it was always kind of in me, but it looked different because of life situations and I didn't have the power and the say or the money to go where I wanted to go as. . Yeah. It's a little different when you're a kid because you, you are at the mercy of your parents mm-hmm. Right. Right. And what it is they wanna do. For sure. [00:07:00] Did your father compete in sailing mm-hmm. , or was it just He did. He did. Yeah, he did. He did. Every Sunday. . Wow. Ooh, okay. . That's it's a, it's a, a huge community, the sailing community. Mm-hmm. , but it's a, it's a very it's very different. , let's say from land lovers. Mm-hmm. . Yeah. It's a very, very different community. Yes. and, and your mom. Mm-hmm. . How did this affect your mom at the time? I think, I mean, her and I have talked about it a little bit, and I won't totally speak for her, but I think it was a rough time. They were, they were still married, they were still together. It. In our house that it happened. So it was, I mean, I don't know. I, it would be really, really hard. I can't imagine to lose your husband is one thing, [00:08:00] obviously. So she lost her husband. She lost the father of children. Of her children. And then so navigating, how do you, how do you grieve that loss but still show up for your kids? And I don't know how she did. . She did it , but I don't know how it is. I would imagine a very, very hard juggle to have to, to have to juggle, so, oh my God. Yeah. We thankfully have a, a lot of really amazing supports between friends or family. So I think that that is the number one way that we all kind of got through it is, I mean, the night that it happened, we probably had 25 people all there. whether it be help take care of us or help take care of her, help take care of the house or him, or whatever the case may, may be. They were there the next day to be like, okay, my, my dad was the one that made the most money. So finances were, were a struggle and we didn't have [00:09:00] life, life insurance. Oh. Right. So figuring out like, how do we navigate this whole thing financially? So she had friends show up and like, here's this application, here's what you need to do. Mm-hmm. , I will do it. This is what I'm doing. So I had a lot of people really take the reins on things and help us out. Oh, thank God for that. [00:09:21] Elaine Lindsay: Cuz that doesn't always happen. Right? [00:09:23] Katie Thornton: No, we were very, very fortunate that we have, we have a good team. Mm-hmm. . And it must be a good small town too. It, it is. I have my moments on how I feel about it. Yeah. but there, there are definitely good things that have come out of it. [00:09:41] Elaine Lindsay: Yeah. I, I think that, I think that's normal. I think we all have mixed feelings about where we grew up and mm-hmm. and the people around us. It is of course, harder when you go through something traumatic, especially in high school. [00:09:57] Katie Thornton: Right. [00:09:59] Elaine Lindsay: You know, it, it's [00:10:00] hard for, it's hard for younger children and, and I'm, I'm sure it was very hard for your brother as well, but being in high school, on top of it being an awkward time as a human being, right. There's all those hormones and, and you know, as you said, you didn't know who Katie was.. and this certainly didn't help. [00:10:24] Katie Thornton: Right. [00:10:24] Elaine Lindsay: But you're to be commended because not all of us who had a loss in our teenage years chose a good path or, or chose any path for that matter. Mm-hmm. in some cases because some people freeze. Some people hide. Some people. , take the bull by the horns and, and mm-hmm. , go on and live their life. And, and you obviously did that, which I think is quite incredible. Yeah. Yeah. And also speaks to probably the, the strength of your mom. Mm-hmm. [00:11:00] did, was there, was there any indication, like, do you, you ever ask yourself, did you see something in your dad? [00:11:13] Katie Thornton: I knew that night. Oh, we were we were supposed to go, well, we weren't, I wasn't going to go, but I ended up being in the car somehow, . We were supposed, the circus was in town, so we were supposed to be going to the circus that night. [00:11:26] Elaine Lindsay: Okay. [00:11:26] Katie Thornton: And there was like a whole thing of events that happened that day in that evening before going, so I ended up, I'm like, fine, I'll just go with everybody too. and he was in the car, but he was still upset about the things that happened before. And he actually got out of the car and started to walk home. [00:11:46] Elaine Lindsay: Oh. [00:11:46] Katie Thornton: And my brother was like, let's go to the circus. I'm like, Nope. We're go like, we need to go home. And my mom knew we needed to go home. So I knew, and that's not the first time I knew like he had been in the hospital before. Not that it had always been [00:12:00] communicated with me. Yeah. On that I. . I also knew at that time that there was something going on, whether I knew the extent of it or not, I don't, I don't know. But I knew something was going on, but I knew that night that things were not normal and not okay. And that we needed it to go home. [00:12:19] Elaine Lindsay: Yeah. Yeah. And, and that in itself were you closer to your dad than your. mom? [00:12:27] Katie Thornton: My dad was always my coach for soccer, so we spent a lot of time together for sports. My mom and I are still very similar on a lot of things and I think that that caused a lot of tension and a lot of issues growing up. Yeah. My mom is my best friend now as an adult and everything, so I don't, I mean, I probably was closer with my dad cuz I just spent more time with him. with soccer and everything. [00:12:56] Elaine Lindsay: But the reason I asked is because [00:13:00] often when it's children, if you are very close to the parent that you lose, you do have thesenot premonitions, but maybe feelings ahead of time. [00:13:13] Katie Thornton: Mm-hmm. , [00:13:13] Elaine Lindsay: even, even when you don't know as a child, you, you know, there's so. . [00:13:19] Katie Thornton: Right. [00:13:19] Elaine Lindsay: You may not be able to articulate it. [00:13:21] Katie Thornton: Mm-hmm. , [00:13:23] Elaine Lindsay: but that does make it difficult. And one of the reasons that I do this podcast is because I, I want us all to end the silence and, and deal with the stigma and the shame that people go through, [00:13:40] Katie Thornton: right. [00:13:41] Elaine Lindsay: Because, You lose a loved one. It does not matter to me how it happened. Mm-hmm. , you, you are suffering a loss of someone that you loved and [00:13:51] Katie Thornton: Right. [00:13:51] Elaine Lindsay: And that's what we need to remember. [00:13:54] Katie Thornton: Mm-hmm. , what was your dad's first name? Mike. [00:13:58] Elaine Lindsay: Mike, okay. [00:14:00] That's, that's I don't know. It's something that I've always asked people because I think it's important to. To give voice to the names of those we've lost. [00:14:11] Katie Thornton: No, I agree. I agree. I like making sure when I'm working with other people and talking to people that we are using their names too, so I like it. [00:14:24] Elaine Lindsay: And do you have children? [00:14:26] Katie Thornton: I do. I have two. [00:14:28] Elaine Lindsay: Okay. And what are your thoughts on age appropriate for children when. As a therapist. [00:14:38] Katie Thornton: Mm-hmm. [00:14:39] Elaine Lindsay: when do you believe it's a good time to share? Like, maybe not in excessive detail, but share that you've lost someone? [00:14:49] Katie Thornton: So, I mean, our kids are young, so I have a four, she'll be five in March, and then the other one is four months, so she's still itty bitty. [00:15:00] Our four year old. . She, well, she looks at pictures of my dad and she, yeah, looks at him. She knows that that's her grandpa. She'll ask like, what's his name? Cuz she knows, like she knows that my mom is her grandma, but she doesn't call her grandma. So I let her name him cuz she's. also their first grandkid. So I'm like, you get to, you get to name him, what do you wanna call him? So she calls him Pop Pop. She has pictures of him. She has her favorite pictures of him. She does ask, she has asked before, like where he is or if she can see him or visit him or something. I can't remember how it all happened exactly, but she has asked where he is. and the conversation kind of threw me off guard at first cuz I'm like, you're two and a half where, why are you asking where pop pop is . Yeah. But we've gone to, and I think every family's gonna be different on how they handle the conversation and yeah, granted our [00:16:00] family is not super religious or anything like that, but I don't know. The first thing that kind of came to both of us, cuz her other grandpa has also passed. . So the first thing that kinda came to both of us is like, your grandpas are in heaven. Yeah. And right now that's good enough for her. And she's like, yeah, they're in heaven. They're happy. So cuz we've had the conversation too of like, we've lost our dog. So we've had to, to explain what happens and like why that's where her dog is. So then she's like, , our dog is with pop Pop, like they're having fun. So it gives her like that sense of peace and comfort, I guess. I don't know. And content. That's where, yeah, that's where we are with the conversation right now is pop, pop is in heaven. And that's all she really knows. And that's all she's really asked. I'm sure that as she gets older she might ask more questions. . And I think that it's important too that at some point, whenever that point is, and I don't know when that's gonna be, , it is gonna be [00:17:00] important for her to to know at least a little bit. She doesn't need to know the details if she doesn't want to kind of thing. But I think family history is important in mental health is part of her family history and our medical history. So at some point I think it is gonna be important for her to know. I just don't know when that time is gonna be yet. We're just playing our cards as she throws them at us a absolutely. [00:17:23] Elaine Lindsay: And that's actually why I asked because. , we are seeing kids younger and younger, not, not only not understanding [00:17:33] Katie Thornton: mm-hmm. , [00:17:34] Elaine Lindsay: but not understanding the thoughts in their own brains. [00:17:37] Katie Thornton: Mm-hmm. [00:17:37] Elaine Lindsay: And the fact that we don't talk about it, we need to bring it out so kids know. Not every thought that runs through your head. [00:17:45] Katie Thornton: Mm-hmm. [00:17:45] Elaine Lindsay: is real. Or, or is true. And, and sometimes we, we can talk about those things now. and allow you to get that out of the way and, and not, [00:18:00] I don't wanna say cover up, but [00:18:01] Katie Thornton: mm-hmm. , [00:18:02] Elaine Lindsay: you know, not, not push it aside. [00:18:05] Katie Thornton: Right. Right. [00:18:06] Elaine Lindsay: It's, it's important for, for us to acknowledge all of our mental health [00:18:12] Katie Thornton: mm-hmm. [00:18:12] Elaine Lindsay: and the fact that, you know, people in the family have gone through something, and you know, after P T S D affects so many people for so many reasons. I think it's really important that kids understand that as well. [00:18:30] Katie Thornton: Yes, I think this kid is definitely a therapist child because we're very big on using our words and she's very big on her feelings. [00:18:39] Elaine Lindsay: Oh, that's good. That's good. , you probably don't think so all the time, [00:18:46] Katie Thornton: but not all the time. There are times that it can be challenging as a parent. But then I just remind myself of like, we want strong, independent women and that's what we're raising her to be, and. . It'll all be good. [00:19:00] It'll all be good for her in the long run. [00:19:02] Elaine Lindsay: Yeah. Yeah. There are challenge, there are definitely challenging days with children, for sure. . But I wanted, I wanted to say, and, and do you, do you think your, your father's death led you down the path of your career? or was it something you, it wasn't something you were leaning towards prior? [00:19:29] Katie Thornton: I was always thinking about being in the field of like working with people and helping people. So yes, in that aspect that's always been a thing. But specifically working on therapy and mental health? No. No, I think his death and the way that he did die is absolutely what pushed me into the mental health direction of helping people and working with people.. Because I was looking more like the medical side and the medical aspect, but after that I was like, no, that's [00:20:00] not the route that I want to go. [00:20:01] Elaine Lindsay: I, it's, it's a very double edge sword that we have to live through these things to have full empathy for others who are going through these things. [00:20:15] Katie Thornton: Right. [00:20:15] Elaine Lindsay: And, and that makes you. very good therapist because you, you understand, right? [00:20:22] Katie Thornton: I think, I mean, it definitely, it definitely gives me kind of that benefit is I've been through something too. So yes, it gives that relatability and I, I say that all the time when I'm meeting with potential clients is like I can have the entire alphabet behind my name and I can have all the degrees and all the certificates and all the training in the. , but if you feel like I can't relate to you or I don't understand you, or you just don't like my personality, cuz that's a big thing too, I'm not the right therapist for you because that relationship between a therapist and a client is so [00:21:00] important and that is gonna be more important and more impactful and lead to more success than having the whole alphabet behind my name. [00:21:11] Elaine Lindsay: Absolutely. I totally agree with. and it's, it's interesting cuz I've had this discussion about the medical field in general. . Mm-hmm. , I firmly believe that doctors, all doctors need to go through the process of surgery before you can fully understand how to be a good surgeon. [00:21:34] Katie Thornton: Right, right. [00:21:35] Elaine Lindsay: You know, and, and the same for dentists. And I think it's really important for you to be able to have had that, that knowledge, that understanding, so that you can be much more empathetic. [00:21:52] Katie Thornton: Right. No, I agree. I agree. [00:21:54] Elaine Lindsay: And it will resonate, I'm sure, with your clients as well. Yeah, yeah. [00:22:00] And you have a, you have a rather broad based practice as well. [00:22:06] Katie Thornton: I've definitely been in a lot of different areas throughout my career for sure. Whether it be in working with children, working with families, working in schools, working in child protection. So I've definitely been in a variety of areas and then also working in like nonprofits or community mental health agencies. Oh, okay. So, and then private practices. And then I have just recently gone out on my own. So now that I'm out on my own, I am being a little bit more like strict and narrow about what I take and like really honing in on my skillset and my area of expertise and all of. So now that I'm on my own, I am being a little bit more picky and strict about who I'm working with, but I feel like I kind of can be, and that's how I'm gonna be the most successful, is just really absolutely honing in on my, my [00:23:00] strengths. [00:23:00] Elaine Lindsay: Absolutely. Because when, when that's what you bring to the table, then that's where you can be most effective. Absolutely. [00:23:07] Katie Thornton: Mm-hmm. [00:23:09] Elaine Lindsay: on that note we talked briefly before this about some, I think, I think it's exciting upcoming news. [00:23:19] Katie Thornton: Yeah. [00:23:20] Elaine Lindsay: What is it you're going to be doing in March? [00:23:22] Katie Thornton: No, I am excited about it. It's something that I have been wanting to do for a, a while in. life kept happening. So it hasn't happened yet, but it's going to, in March, I am going to start a group for people that have lost someone to suicide and working on helping people to find that strength again after losing a loved one to suicide and, and helping them through that process and that journey. And I think in the mental health world, we always say it's okay to not be. Yeah, and that's absolutely true. Like it is okay for us to not have good days all the time because that's reality. Mm-hmm. , [00:24:00] we're human beings. And I feel like the other thing, especially with a suicide loss, is reminding people that it's also okay to be okay. [00:24:10] Elaine Lindsay: Yeah. [00:24:11] Katie Thornton: Because we have so much guilt, I think when it comes to suicide of like they were obviously in this not so good head space and that's where they were. And they were clearly struggling and battling and. fighting with themselves internally. So I think sometimes when we, we work through that grief, grief is hard and it's complicated and there's all these different things. Yeah. And then when we get to that acceptance stage of grief, we can also be like, Ooh. Then there's this guilt of I shouldn't be okay. I shouldn't just be like going and living my happy life when. This person was going through all these terrible things and this is what happened. Like how can I, how can I be okay and live my life and be happy and excited? So you feel guilty? And I [00:25:00] think it's a normal part of grief, especially with the suicide grief. [00:25:04] Elaine Lindsay: Yeah. [00:25:04] Katie Thornton: And I also want people to know that like, it's okay to still like be happy and excited about life. . [00:25:12] Elaine Lindsay: And another piece to that is there is no timeframe. [00:25:20] Katie Thornton: No, there's not a timeline on on grief, unfortunately. And just because there's the stages of grief and you've gone through the stages of grief. doesn't mean that it's not gonna come back up for you another time. Life events seem to bring that grief back up where it's like, I've already gone through these things, so why am I going through, like, why am I depressed again? I was, I went through depression. Mm-hmm. . So why am I depressed? But life events seem to bring. those things back up. [00:25:50] Elaine Lindsay: I totally agree. I I've often thought it's kind of like a merry-go-round. Mm-hmm. , I, I don't wanna get back on, [00:26:00] but it's there and, and it's attached to me and there are things that. that are part of my history. Mm-hmm. and, and you find yourself sometimes right back on there. [00:26:11] Katie Thornton: Mm-hmm. . Yeah. [00:26:15] Elaine Lindsay: I know that over the years that's, that's been a, a common question for people is, well, how long is too long? Like, or How short is too short? And, and I think it's really important that we reinforce the fact. , everybody is individual. [00:26:37] Katie Thornton: Mm-hmm. . Absolutely. It's gonna look different for everybody. Yeah. And it's gonna feel different for everybody. [00:26:42] Elaine Lindsay: Yeah. [00:26:43] Katie Thornton: And I mean, you can go back to the fact that my brother and I are in the same family and the same household, and we had the same like upbringing, but we grieved differently. And that doesn't mean that either one of us grieved right or wrong. No. We grieved the way that we needed to grieve at that.[00:27:00] and, and that's a really super point. There is no right or wrong. Mm-hmm. [00:27:07] Elaine Lindsay: to grief. It just is however it is for you. [00:27:13] Katie Thornton: Yeah. Yeah. [00:27:16] Elaine Lindsay: And, and that's the other reason that I do the podcast is because we found that in sharing your story, it can somewhat lighten your. and can give you the opportunity to sometimes bolster the good memories and remember to say their names. [00:27:40] Katie Thornton: Right. No, I think , I think it can be really empowering to share your story because there is so much stigma and there's so much judgment and negativity around mental health and around suicide specifically. . Where II think that there's times that we can be shamed for, [00:27:58] Elaine Lindsay: yeah. [00:27:59] Katie Thornton: For our [00:28:00] lives and our stories and our journeys, but when you go through it and you finally find your voice to be able to share your story and know that it can actually impact other people in yes, really positive ways. It is also really empowering and therapeutic to just like get it out of you so it helps you and it can help other. . [00:28:21] Elaine Lindsay: Yeah. And sometimes that's the, just that extra incentive you need. Mm-hmm. to deal with. Another little piece of your grief is to share your story. [00:28:32] Katie Thornton: Yeah, absolutely. [00:28:35] Elaine Lindsay: So is there something you would like to leave the audience? That either something you find useful, something that, that you tell your clients, something that's intrinsically you. [00:28:53] Katie Thornton: Ooh, I don't know. That's a hard one. I mean, [00:29:00] I do remind my clients like making, making yourself a. Especially as like as a parent you still have to put yourself first. And I know not everyone agrees with that, but we do have to make ourselves a priority so that we can take care of ourselves and we can show up the best way that we can show up in all of our other areas of life. And then I also do, I like to, especially when it's suicide and those that have lost someone to suicide, is just reminding them that it is okay to be okay and it's okay to be happy and excited about life again. because that's what you deserve. [00:29:41] Elaine Lindsay: That was beautifully said, Katie. Thank you so much. [00:29:44] Katie Thornton: Of course. [00:29:47] Elaine Lindsay: I really appreciate Katie Thornton being with us today, and I look forward to perhaps talking with you again, Katie. [00:29:56] Katie Thornton: Absolutely. Absolutely. [00:29:58] Elaine Lindsay: I'm Elaine Lindsay. This is [00:30:00] Suicide Zen Forgiveness. As per always make the very best of your today, every day. I look forward to seeing you next time. Bye for now.
Coach Nathaniel J Brown S4 E1
Jan 10 2023
Coach Nathaniel J Brown S4 E1
I'm thrilled to begin the new season with my amazing guest, Coach Nathaniel J Brown. From childhood I was always curious. Taking the time to disassemble things for the sake of seeing how they work, and questioning things that didn't quite add up. But, at the age of 8 something happened that silenced me and for nearly 3 decades. I was sexually molested. The fallout from that trauma had taken its toll on my entire world. I battled with PTSD, night terrors, mis-identity, inferiority, anger, isolation and the overall feeling of not being enough. I hurt and betrayed so many people, and I knew that I could not sustain this way of living without utter self sabotage. Everything around me was crumbling and I had to take action if things were going to change. So, I got help. And, with that help, I began understanding how important it was for me to shift my perspective. After doing the deep inner work and shifting my mindset along with my perspective, I have made it my mission to help everyone, especially men, reconnect to who they truly are, separate from their traumas and outside of the "masculinity" labels of society.  I believe that men and women who have taken the time to "re-see" their traumatic experiences with a new perspective, engage with life differently. They become better Fathers, Mothers, Husbands, Wives, Entrepreneurs and Leaders. "There is a life worth living on the other side of trauma and I believe that when we embrace "that" life, we can truly Be, Do and Have whatever we desire."  "Change Your Perspective. Change Your Story. Change Your Life." “𝐼𝑛𝑠𝑝𝑖𝑟𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑌𝑜𝑢 𝑇𝑜 𝐿𝑖𝑣𝑒 𝐵𝑒𝑦𝑜𝑛𝑑 𝑌𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝐿𝑖𝑚𝑖𝑡𝑠!“ "The Most Important Thing That You Can Do For Your Future Is Take A Step NOW" 💘Hᴜsʙᴀɴᴅ 🥰Fᴀᴛʜᴇʀ 🎙 Pᴏᴅᴄᴀsᴛ Hᴏsᴛ  CLICK HERE to listen to the INSPIRE Beyond Podcast!! 🎤 𝕀𝕟𝕤𝕡𝕣𝕒𝕥𝕚𝕠𝕟𝕒𝕝 Sᴘᴇᴀᴋᴇʀ/Teacher 🧠𝕀𝕟𝕥𝕦𝕚𝕥𝕚𝕧𝕖 Clarity Cᴏᴀᴄʜ linktr.ee/nathanieljbrown Links Instagram  TikTok LinkedIn Clubhouse   Email
Holiday Info • sign off.. and Hiatus S3 E10
Dec 20 2022
Holiday Info • sign off.. and Hiatus S3 E10
This episode is a little different... With this being the Holiday Season 2022, I want to talk a little about some of the holidays that happen this December. We are taking a hiatus until the 10th of January  so this is the final show of season 3... I’m going to mention a few of the holidays coming up..with a little info on each of them. Dec 18th Hannukah began Dec 18th this year and continues for 8 nights until de 26th The Jewish Festival of Rededication, also called the Festival of Lights, is an eight-day celebration that falls each year on the Hebrew calendar date of 25 Kislev, which generally falls in December in the Gregorian calendar. (In 2022, Hanukkah is December 18 through December 26.) Hanukkah, also referred to as Chanukah, celebrates the rededication of the second Jewish temple in Jerusalem. The holiday is celebrated with the lighting of the menorah, traditional foods, games, and gifts. Dec 21st  Blue Christmas (US) Blue Christmas is a Western Christian tradition that happens on or around the longest night of the year, usually December 21 the Winter Solstice. It is about comforting fellow Christians who are grieving and struggling to find joy and hope during the season. Winter Solstice The Winter Solstice marks the day with the shortest period of daylight and the longest night of the year (in the Northern Hemisphere), all thanks to the tilt of the earth. In many cultures, the day is a day of feasting and celebration, but even if you’re totally agnostic, you can still find a reason to rejoice, because after today, you’ll see gradually shorter nights and longer days, which means you can look forward to the emergence of spring. Yule (UK) Yule comes up on December 21, on the winter solstice. It is the shortest day and longest night of the year, as the Sun gets its lowest elevation in the sky. Apart from the marking of a new season, the winter solstice also holds a significant symbol for the Sun. It appears to stand still on this day, it’s believed that the Sun is going through a rebirth. It would then gain momentum after the solstice. The holiday also depicts several pagan beliefs, especially that of the Holly King handing over power to the Oak King, ushering in a new season of light. Dec 23rd  Festivus  Festivus is on December 23 and it’s perfect for those who don’t have a traditional holiday to celebrate. Although it sounds paradoxical, its purpose makes a lot of sense. Not everyone has a major holiday to celebrate like Christmas, Hanukkah, or Kwanzaa and they can feel left out. This holiday gives many people a non-denominational and non-commercial holiday to call their own. Festivus is for everybody! Dec 25th Christmas Every year on December 25, we celebrate Christmas, a day for spending time with family, observing an important Christian holiday, partaking in lighthearted traditions, or just spreading some holiday cheer! Christmas has evolved over several millennia into a worldwide celebration that’s both religious and secular and chock full of fun-filled, family activities. Dec 26th  Kwanzaa  Heri Za Kwanzaa! Kwanzaa, celebrated from December 26 to January 1, is an African American and pan-African seven-day cultural holiday that celebrates family and community. During the holiday, families celebrate with feasts, music, and dance, and end the holiday with a day dedicated to reflection and recommitment to the seven principles.  Boxing day Boxing Day is held every December 26th in many countries associated with the British empire. It started as a day to give gifts to the household staff of Britain’s upper classes but has morphed into a sort of shopping holiday of its own. In fact, its one of the most popular days to return Christmas gifts to the stores. St Stephen's day in Ireland Dec 26th St. Stephen’s Day is still referred to as the Day of the Wren, especially in rural Ireland. Due to its Catholic roots, St. Stephen’s Day has been a holiday in Ireland for many years. It was only in 1871 that it became a public holiday after the Bank Holidays Act of 1871 was passed. Dec 28th National Call a Friend Day  Christmas is over and New Year’s is on its way. But in the meantime, December 28 is National Call a Friend Day! Between the stress of the daily grind at work, the needs of your family, and ensuring you have a little time for yourself, our lives can get awfully hectic. National Call a Friend Day reminds us all to take a few minutes, pick up the phone, and call that friend you’ve been meaning to get back in touch with. In modern times, technology has the capacity to unite us more than ever before. The internet isn’t fazed by distance, time zones, or how much money you have in the bank. But in our day to day lives of whizzing from one task to the next (or even multi-tasking on all our projects at once), technology often has the opposite effect. Checking emails, answering texts, responding to Facebook notifications, and other tech-based tasks can fill up our lives and actually make us feel less connected to the people we’re spending all our time connecting with! So with the holiday season rapidly drawing to a close this year, make an effort on December 28 to reach out with a phone call and connect, voice to voice, with a good friend.   Dec 31st Hogmanay Hogmanay is a Scottish word meaning “the last day of the year.” It’s celebrated in Scotland on New Year’s Eve, when Scots host house parties and exchange gifts. The celebrations are often followed by parties on both New Year’s Day and January 2, which is a bank holiday in Scotland. While the origins of Hogmanay are hard to pinpoint, its roots are thought to lie in Norse and Gaelic traditions. New Year’s Eve New Year’s Eve comes but once a year on December 31, the last day of the last month of what usually feels like the longest year ever but somehow passed too quickly. Most of us give little thought as to why we ceremoniously say goodbye to one year and hello to a new one on December 31.  Even those who don’t make special plans to greet the arrival of a new year at the stroke of midnight on December 31 pay homage to the rite with thoughts of the year gone by and hopes for the year to come. This was a bit lighter fare, with a few interesting dates and information.  However,  this can be such a tough time of year for anyone.   Thinking of  each of you through this  often difficult time.    Many folks struggle during the holidays. Some people are overwhelmed with sadness. Some are simply overwhelmed.  Reach out and talk to someone.. say hello. to a neighbour, a store clerk, someone you pass on the street..    Smile   Facial expressions do more than express emotions, they also provide feedback to the brain, which influences our emotions.   A new global collaboration led by researchers at Stanford University has shown that even fake or posed smiles can make people feel happier.   May the light of the holidays bring warmth and love into your household, and here's to hoping for a better year ahead. Thank you for listening.  Season 3 of The suicide Zen Forgiveness podcast comes to a close..  I will be taking the next few weeks to take stock of the year that has passed...and prepare for the new year to come... Let us know if there are topics you would like me to cover..  Guests you would like me to talk with..  I will return on January 10th, 2023
Cynthia Shelton S3 E7
Nov 28 2022
Cynthia Shelton S3 E7
In today's episode we discuss losing a parent as an adult.. And the pain and guilt it can cause.. even though its not your fault. Learning how to go forward.  Cynthia Shelton Youthful Aging Advocate CEO at Vibrant Living Former Director, Career & Technical Education at Oak Harbor School District Former Director Applied Learning at Shoreline School District Former Director Vocational Eduction at Federal Way School District Former Executive Director at Private Initiatives in Public Education (PIPE) Studied at Colorado State University, University of Montana and Gonzaga University Studied at Central Washington University  Originally From Walla Walla, Washington Married 55 years to her wonderful husband John  Cynthia says "What excites me is to inspire women (and men) who really want to live with vim, and vigor having a vibrant lifestyle, like I do at 78.  And, I don’t want to keep this information to myself, any longer. After a 4-decade career as an education administrator, working long days, with long commutes, lacking a balanced life for more fun time with family and friends; Cynthia realized there was more to life and she wanted: - More play time - More financial security and stability - More money for extras, travel, contributions and gifts - More time for me It was when her dear friend said, she had “freed herself both physically and financially”, no longer working “time for dollars” and created financial freedom from home….  Cynthia  LISTENED and leaned into the opportunity! Since then, she’s been mentoring others to build an exit strategy from the daily grind and earn a lucrative income from home - for free. Today, Cynthia is on a mission to reverse the effects of aging. Cynthia Shelton is Youthful Aging Advocate, I say expert who inspires you to have physical and financial wellness. Cynthia helps people who. . .  want to age with grace. . .complain about aging and don’t realize that accepting the downward slide does not need to be their norm.  want to alleviate or eliminate the side effects of aging. In today's episode we discuss  losing a parent as an adult.. And the pain and guilt it can cause.. even though its not your fault. Learning how to go forward.  Social Media links: Follow on Facebook  Connect on LinkedIn    Follow on Instagram     Cynthia's Website
Finding the Root of Your Limiting Beliefs with Elaine S3 E6
Nov 22 2022
Finding the Root of Your Limiting Beliefs with Elaine S3 E6
This episode is about delving into my self-limiting beliefs and finally finding the root of a really huge one…Being locked away. I always thought you could get locked up for your weirdness or negative thoughts... I unravel the story of that belief and mourn the consequences of the actions of society back in the 60s and 70s.  My friend Michel was one such casualty. In this episode I discuss the Rideau Regional Centre,known to me as the Rideau regional Hospital School: located in Smiths Falls, Ontario, opened in 1951 as the Ontario Hospital School. Along with similar residential institutions throughout Ontario, this was the largest such facility. On approaching the semi-circular drive that curved up to the front entrance it was an imposing sight. RRHS was designed to house individuals who were deemed to have cognitive and physical disabilities. Individuals could be admitted by parents and guardians, training schools, or the Children’s Aid Society.  This institution left its mark on those who lived there and those of us who worked there as well.  In researching for this episode I came across a number of articles that actually reinforced my silence and aversion to authority and authoritative decisions.  I do not know where my friend Michel was sent once the facility closed.. nor do I know for sure he was there until the end. I simply know the injustice of him being dumped at a facility, stuck in my craw, and added to the litany of things that made me question all i knew in terms if authority, religion, and what was right  in my heart, my mind, my soul)  That first day of work in the Summer of 1970, I had to traverse the entire length of the main building the minute we arrived. That buildings’ corridor was an eighth of a mile long! I was to check in at what was called Female Admission although, truth be told some of the residents, like young Lizzie,( I met her when i was a volunteer) had been there for years. (Lizzie was about 11- 13 at the time. Lizzie was unaware of her own strength and had a mercurial temper. When she was happy there was sunshine radiating from her smile) Remember I said the main corridor was an eighth of a mile long. Only 2 days before I started my summer job there, I had the cast on my leg,(hip to ankle), removed after eight long weeks.  My leg had required a meniscectomy, and at the time, after surgery, the surgeon placed your leg in a cast to restrict movement. Two months had gone by with my knee unable to bend. This long trudge a few times a day was definitely trial by fire.. an eighth of a mile one way, 4 to 6 times a day. The photo below is only one small section of one of the corridors which were endless.  Suicidal ideation like any other uncomfortable topic, was not something we ever spoke about like so much else in the sixties and early seventies.  I am so enamoured of millennials and gen Z who are taking out all the hidden, taboo subjects and working through their feelings in the open, more and more.  This is why this podcast exists.. to continue the much needed, often difficult conversations. Thank you for tuning in... Make the most of your today, every day!
What is Your Go-to Emotion? S3 E3
Oct 18 2022
What is Your Go-to Emotion? S3 E3
I find that all of us have a single emotion which is our fall back. I realize this sounds odd but hear me out.   In any given day one can run through the gamut of emotions. I find I seem to always gravitate to one emotion: NOT that the particular emotion actually fits the scenario it just seems to be the comfort zone of emotion. for many many years that emotion was anger. It wasn't always appropriate. in fact, probably most of the time, 'anger' was not the emotion that fir the scenario. It seemed to be the first response to a lot. i now know it was triggered by pain.  Living in pain 24/7 can be exhausting, and frustrating and can make you feel like a pot about to boil over at any moment.   “When someone suffers from pain for an extended period, this can affect their mood negatively,” Dr. Cosio explains. “These mood changes can negatively impact their levels of activity. People begin to engage in more unhealthy behaviors and less in healthy ones.” Interestingly, a study Conducted by Dr Cosio's research team. in 2018 looked at the prevalence rates of different psychological domains among veterans with chronic pain, they found that women (88%) reported anger more often than men (72%.).  They say anger can be a coping mechanism in response to pain.  Chronic pain is actually proven to be worsened by anger.  Anger releases cortisol, adrenaline and other chemicals that make things worse all round. When you Look for more... As I began to explore alternate modalities to deal with my pain, like meditation, visualization mindfulness and gratitude, I found myself less likely to become angry and had to learn to feel all the other emotions more freely, and allow them to flow and go.  Did you know the lifespan of an emotion is about 90 seconds? ( attributed to Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor, a Harvard-trained neuroscientist who specialized in the anatomy of the brain.) Yet, we humans are so attached to the story.. we can drag the emotions out for ages, based on the stories we tell ourselves... I have seen a huge change over the years, where my first go-to was anger, now I find gratitude is my go-to. Finding the gratitude in all the little things seems to increase those things I can be grateful for, all around me. This is an incredibly important shift for me.  Not only has it changed how and if I react, this change to mindfulness and gratitude has allowed me to significantly lower my pain medications.  I am so grateful for this new lease on life. Being able to interact without the haze of heavy medication lets so much more joy into my day.  I learned that all of it was my choice.  Viktor Frankl wrote, “When we can no longer change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves... Everything can be taken from a human but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”  in his book Man’s Search for Meaning,  Being present in all the moments you can, gives you a better appreciation for the little things. Mindfulness can show you a wealth of gifts both large and small for which to be thankful. And making the choice to improve yourself, is the greatest gift you can give to you. This is why I all ways make an effort to make the most of today, every day!  And why I sign off my correspondence the same way!
Lois Hollis Shame-Guilt: one of the most forbidden subjects.S2 E13
Sep 6 2022
Lois Hollis Shame-Guilt: one of the most forbidden subjects.S2 E13
Lois Hollis, RN, BSN. REV. shifts our opinion on one of the most forbidden subjects, shame and guilt. Her passion is to show the way to self-love by releasing shame guilt (not shame and guilt.) Shame and guilt reinforce each other to produce negative emotions such as anger, depression, anxiety, addictions, traumas, etc. They infiltrate our emotions with stealth precision that causes our struggles from low confidence to suicide. Depression, anxiety, 30 years of migraine headaches, and pain were Lois’ way of life until she learned about the dangers of shameguilt. She realized that shame guilt was within her anger, depression, migraines, rage, fears, and physical pain. The solution was to confront shameguilt.   She shares her 15 years’ experience as a ShameGuilt Educator, Counselor, Filmmaker, author to give us a way to health, wellness, and spiritual maturity. Lois began as a Nurse’ Aide at 12 and continues today at 78 to be a health advocate. Lois experienced spiritual encounters after severe childhood abuse.   Lois is a trailblazer. She developed one of the first Kidney Hemodialysis centers in the United States. Today, Lois brings shame and guilt together as a new field to study. She has authored three books and the 'I'm good' films. Her newest book, contains her Spirit to cancel the shame guilt hypnosis.   From Lois I’m a Trailblazer As a student and teacher, I am educating others on the dangerous impact of shame and guilt upon each of us. My I’m Good” Docu-series further illustrates how changing the shame/guilt system solves our mental health crisis. In 1964 as a registered nurse, I joined the University of Maryland open-heart surgical and nursing team. I modified my traditional nursing skills to meet the challenges of the new field of open-heart surgery. In 1966 I was a Nurse Entrepreneur. I helped establish one of the first kidney hemodialysis units in the United States at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. I assisted with research, teaching, and consulting to support other dialysis centers. Before the availability of the hepatitis vaccine, I contained a hepatitis epidemic at Thomas Jefferson Dialysis Unit and developed protocols for hepatitis management in hemodialysis to other units. I co-founded the AANNT American Association of Nephrology Nurses and Technicians in 1971 to standardize procedures for hemodialysis nursing. With sadness and the resistance of colleagues, I left traditional medicine in 1980 for holistic health to save my daughters’ life and my own. I know firsthand the importance of healing and the spirit of living. I am blessed for extra years by overcoming heart disease, kidney dysfunction, brain traumas, rib fractures, and 30 years of migraine headaches. I had three miscarriages, but God gave me three beautiful daughters. Why I chose shame and guilt for study? Shame and guilt reinforce each other to produce negative emotions such as anger, depression, addictions, etc. Shame guilt harms our physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual states. Lack of knowledge and their secrecy gives them power. Connect With Lois lois3hollis@gmail.com https://loishollis.com https://www.imgoodfilm.com/ https://truthissimple.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/loishollis/ https://www.facebook.com/lois3hollis https://www.facebook.com/LoisAHollis https://www.facebook.com/groups/1362596790752033 https://youtube.com/user/ShameGuiltSurvival https://www.instagram.com/shameguilt_ @shameguilt_ https://twitter.com/loishollis3 __________________________________ Lois spoke of DR. DAVID HAWKINS here His map of Consciousness
Suicide Prevention With Fiduciary Advisor Lawrence ‘Larry’ D Sprung CFP® S2 E11
Aug 9 2022
Suicide Prevention With Fiduciary Advisor Lawrence ‘Larry’ D Sprung CFP® S2 E11
Lawrence “Larry” Sprung, CFP®, is the founder and wealth advisor at Mitlin Financial, Inc. Larry is also the host of the Mitlin Money Mindset™ a podcast that’s all about getting your mind right when it comes to all things money. One of Larry’s greatest passions is raising awareness for mental health. He spent over 12 years serving on the National Board of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) and sits on its financial and investment committees.  As a fiduciary advisor, he and his team are dedicated to facilitating the customization of clients’ portfolios as they work toward reaching their financial objectives.   Larry and the Mitlin team prioritize clients first and consistently help clients make healthy financial decisions and offer a tremendous client experience that leverages today’s top tools and technology. Larry has appears on numerous podcasts and in the media speaking most recently on CNBC about money and parenting. He is also a member of the Experian Credit Chat panel and has presented to romance authors at numerous conferences, speaking about financial planning and business structure.    Larry has received several industry recognitions, including being named an Investopedia Top 10 Advisor in 2022 and a 2019 finalist for the Invest in Others For Community Service Award.   Outside the office, one of Larry’s greatest passions is raising awareness for mental health. He spent over 12 years serving on the National Board of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) and sits on its financial and investment committees.    With his wife, Denise, he has raised more than $1.7 million for the organization through the Keith Milano Memorial Fund. The fund was created at AFSP in memory of his brother-in-law.   Larry values his family tremendously and his desire to do right by his wife and two sons drives who he is in and out of the office.    You’ll likely find Larry at any number of ice hockey events on any given weekend or excited for his wife to plan their next Disney vacation.  Connect on Social:    Larry Sprung,  CFP® https://www.linkedin.com/in/lawrencesprung/ https://www.facebook.com/lawrencesprung/ https://twitter.com/Lawrence_Sprung https://www.instagram.com/larry_sprung/
Cid Fernandez Suicide Attempt Survivor S2 E9
Mar 15 2022
Cid Fernandez Suicide Attempt Survivor S2 E9
Originally from Miami, FL1st generation Cuban-AmericanMother born in Cuba Athlete and high school social butterflyHusband to GabyMarried at 19 yrs old Father to 2 teenagersBrianna 14Caiden 13Cecilia – Coming in Aug Joined Marines Corps in 2004 (18 yrs old)Deployed to East AsiaElectrician on helicopters Joined Air Force in 2012Flight EngineerDeployed to Middle East in 14’Flew over 18 missions to Afghanistan Spent over 12 years in AeronauticsTraveled to 23 countriesFluent in 3 languagesEnglishSpanishSarcasm Suicide Attempt SurvivorIn 2001 my parents went through a bad time with one another. The arguments got bad and my mom finally threw my father out of the home that year. During that time I lost the ability to play basketball due to terrible grades. For me Basketball was my form of expression and my therapy. When it was taken away, I hit a real bad point. Obviously perspective is huge in life, as a 15 yr old it felt that everything was caving in and felt the only way out was not being here. I’m thankful the rifle never went off and believe that there was higher calling for me. Since then I’ve dedicated myself to sharing my raw truth with the hopes of empowering others to do the same.These stories have become so tainted and looked at as non-shareable content, but honestly.. It’s time to quit that. Our truths aka our story, shouldn’t be frowned upon. We all come from different paths with similar rest stops and that’s where connection really flourishes.