Generations United Podcast

Generations United

Join our host Donna Butts and other members of the Generations United team for the Generations United Podcast. Episodes feature candid and lively conversations with luminaries on intergenerational and grandfamilies/kinship families topics. Tune in to learn how to strengthen our communities and improve the lives of children, youth, and older adults through intergenerational relationships as well as better support youth and caregivers in grandfamilies.

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Kids & FamilyKids & Family

Episodes

BONUS: Building Resilience: Supporting Grandfamilies’ Mental Health and Wellness
Nov 9 2023
BONUS: Building Resilience: Supporting Grandfamilies’ Mental Health and Wellness
Generations United released our 10th annual "State of Grandfamilies" report on November 8, 2023.  The report, Building Resilience: Supporting Grandfamilies’ Mental Health and Wellness, outlines the reasons grandfamilies have mental health concerns yet have more trouble accessing mental health services and supports for both children and their caregivers due to lack of availability, lack of legal authority, and limited understanding of grandfamilies’ needs among providers, cost, stigma, and ageism. This situation has been exacerbated by Covid-19, racial violence, and opioid use, the report found. Children who have faced traumatic loss or traumatic situations which led to them growing up in families without their parents are particularly susceptible to experiencing mental health concerns. Additionally, gaps in America’s social safety net make it harder for these children to receive the care they need. This event highlighted the key facts, findings, and recommendations from the report and included poetry and spoken word from grandfamilies and a powerful conversation with members of grandfamilies and Dr. Joseph Crumbley about the importance of mental health. The discussion contains information related to mental health and wellness. It is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This conversation and the referenced report may contain sensitive or distressing material. If you or someone you know is experiencing a mental health crisis, please seek immediate help from a qualified mental health professional or contact the Suicide and Crisis Lifeline by dialing “988” on your phone.Speakers:Donna Butts, Executive Director, Generations UnitedSonia Emerson, Child Welfare and Social Justice Advocate, ChildFocus Partners Brittney Barros, Youth Advocate, Michigan Angela Clements, Generations United GRAND Voice, Wisconsin Dr. Joseph Crumbley, Trainer, Consultant, and Therapist Bob Ruble, Generations United GRAND Voice, California Special thanks to The Brookdale Foundation Group for making this report and event possible, and to Centene Corporation for their valuable support.Read the report: https://www.gu.org/resources/building-resilience-grandfamilies-mental-health-and-wellness/Support the show
Special Episode: Cultural Responsiveness in Intergenerational Programs
Aug 17 2023
Special Episode: Cultural Responsiveness in Intergenerational Programs
From the vaults!  Check out Generations United's webinar on the importance of cultural responsiveness in intergenerational programming. This virtual event held in August 2022 and made possible with support from the RRF Foundation for Aging, was co-hosted by the National Indian Child Welfare Association and the National Caucus and Center on Black Aging and included examples of organizations bringing younger and older people together in diverse communities and provided practical recommendations for designing programs and activities that reflect different cultural norms and values.About the SpeakersThis event was facilitated by Dr. Sarah Kastelic (Alutiiq), Executive Director of the National Indian Child Welfare Association, and featured opening remarks from Generations United's Executive Director Donna Butts.  They are joined by Marva Overton, the Executive Director of the Alliance for African American Health in Central Texas who operates Inter-generational Gardening Soul to Soul, a program that brings youth and elders together to construct and maintain vegetable gardens; Dr. Danica Brown (Choctaw) the Behavioral Health Director at the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board, a non-profit tribal advisory organization serving the 43 federally-recognized tribes of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho and Katherine Kim the Program Director for the Koreatown Storytelling Program, a multimedia oral history that brings together high school journalists and community elders from the Koreatown neighborhood of Los Angeles, California.Support the show
Episode 19: Mary O'Donnell and Ernest Gonzales on the Benefits of Intergenerational Programs
Jun 28 2021
Episode 19: Mary O'Donnell and Ernest Gonzales on the Benefits of Intergenerational Programs
A few months ago, Generations United released our latest set of free resources—developed with support from RRF Foundation for Aging—aimed to strengthen and expand intergenerational programs. The publications—Making the Case for Intergenerational Programs, Fact Sheet: Intergenerational Programs Benefit Everyone, and Staying Connected While Staying Apart: Intergenerational Programs & the COVID-19 Pandemic—support the growing field of practice by increasing the knowledge and skills of people working to connect and support older adults, children, and youth. Mary O'Donnell, president of RRF, joined our Executive Director Donna Butts and Ernest Gonzales, Ph.D., who led the development of Generations United's new resources. Dr. Gonzales is also an associate professor and director of the MSW Program at NYU Silver School of Social Work. This episode focuses on how the RRF Foundation for Aging came to include intergenerational programs in their funding priorities and what the Foundation has learned about intergenerational programs. The episode also explores what Dr. Gonzales and his research team learned while creating the intergenerational tools. Other resources mentioned during this interview include:Encore.org's The Power of Connecting the GenerationsGenerations United's Stronger Together: Funders Call to InnovationGrantmakers in Aging's Intergenerational Strategies Ohio State University's College of Social Work's Implementation of Evidence-Base Practices in Intergenerational Programming: A Scoping ReviewVisit gu.org for additional resources. Support the show
Episode 17: Ms. Genia, Keith Lowhorne, and Ana Beltran on Kinship vs. Guardianship
Mar 16 2021
Episode 17: Ms. Genia, Keith Lowhorne, and Ana Beltran on Kinship vs. Guardianship
Across the U.S., more than 2.7 million children are growing up in grandfamilies — families in which grandparents, other adult family members, or close family friends are raising children.Generations United, with support from the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, created a brief and national comparison chart, Adoption and Guardianship for Children in Kinship Foster Care, which focuses on adoption and guardianship for children in kinship foster care, so that these children can exit foster care into permanent families. In this episode, Ana Beltran, co-director of the National Center on Grandfamilies, is joined by Generations United's GRAND Voice Network Members Ms. Genia LaRese Newkirk and Mr. Keith Lowhorne. Ms. Newkirk took guardianship of her niece, Nadia, after becoming licensed as a foster parent.  Ms. Newkirk had never met Nadia before and didn’t know about her.  They were not offered North Carolina’s Guardianship Assistance Program because the state limits their program to children age 14 and older, and Nadia is about 8 years old. Mr. Lowhorne, with his wife, adopted three grandchildren from foster care in Alabama:  Kayren, about age 7; Kaiser, about age 6; and Harper about age 4.Ms. Newkirk and Mr. Lowhorne talk about the options offered and not offered to them when they decided to keep the children in their lives out of the foster care system.Ana offers resources for families in this situation. Show resourcesAdoption and Guardianship for Children in Kinship Foster Care: https://www.gu.org/resources/adoption-and-guardianship-for-children-in-kinship-foster-care/Generations United: www.gu.orgThe National Center on Grandfamilies: www.grandfamilies.org Support the show
Episode 16: Dr. Anita Rogers on How the Intergenerational Field Can Be More Inclusive and Effective in Engaging and Elevating Voices and Initiatives of People of Color
Feb 23 2021
Episode 16: Dr. Anita Rogers on How the Intergenerational Field Can Be More Inclusive and Effective in Engaging and Elevating Voices and Initiatives of People of Color
Dr. Anita Rogers has been involved with the delivery of education, civil rights, human services, reentry programming, violence prevention, victim assistance and mental health in various capacities. As a development consultant, she has raised millions of dollars to help nonprofit and government agencies provide services to underserved populations, especially people of color. She now serves as a senior fellow at Generations UnitedDr. Rogers joined Generations United's Executive Director Donna Butts for a discussion on civil rights work, how the activist landscape has changed, and the similarities between Black Power and Black Lives Matter. Resources mentioned in the show: The Official Campaign of the CROWN Acthttps://www.thecrownact.comThe CROWN Act stands for “Create a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair,” created in 2019 to ensure protection against discrimination based on race-based hairstyles by extending statutory protection to hair texture and protective styles such as braids, locs, twists, and knots in the workplace and public schools. Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH): https://asalh.orgToolkit for those working with African American grandfamilies: http://bit.ly/AfricanAmericanGrandfamiliesToolkit for those working with Native American grandfamilies: http://bit.ly/NativeGrandsGenerations United: https://gu.org Support the show