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We The Children - Kids Talk Climate Solutions

We The Children - Kids Talk Climate Solutions

Hi! My name’s Zachary Fox-Devol. You can just call me Zach. I might only be 12 years old, but I already have a lot of questions about the environment, how climate change will impact my generation and, most importantly, what we can do to help.


That’s why I started this podcast. We the Children is a place for kids like me to learn more about the climate crisis, and the environment, but have some fun along the way, too. On the show, we’ll explore things like climate change, climate action, severe weather and sustainable living, through conversations with experts, educators, and climate activists. I think that kids like me (and maybe you, reading this right now) have a lot to contribute to the global conversation about our environment. It's not about having all the answers; it's about asking big, important questions to the people who are spending their careers thinking about how we can all take climate action, practice sustainability and build a healthier Earth.


Questions like:


How can students effectively get involved in finding a climate solution? What responsibility do schools and administrators have to ensure students are taught about climate change and what life on Earth will look like in the coming years? Can we prevent biodiversity loss and preserve our wetlands and water sources? Why should we care about the conservation of animals like polar bears? Why do we need to pay attention to severe weather? What is the actual impact of our recycling efforts? What is a “green economy,” and who are the innovators that might help us achieve it?


Each episode is a chance to learn together. Air pollution, biodiversity, carbon footprints–sounds like an earth science class, right? But here's the thing: it's not just about learning big words and what they mean. It's about understanding these concepts’ impact on our world. Together, we’ll navigate the tricky terrain of climate action, exploring what it means for us, for the environment, and the world.


Teachers, consider this podcast a little extra help in your mission to educate the next generation about climate change. We the Children isn't just a show; it's a tool for your climate curriculum arsenal. Climate change is a massive topic but together we'll break it down, one concept, one question at a time. Conservation, sustainability, climate solutions – we'll explore them all.


As for you, my fellow students, this podcast is not homework! This is your invitation to be part of a green movement, to become Earth's guardians. From the green wonders and majestic animals on our planet to the pressing issues of global warming, we'll navigate it all with a sense of wonder and humility. Let's make sustainability cool, like the breeze on a hot day or the gentle rain after a storm. Do you hear a guitar? I might be writing a song here, sorry…


Anyway, I think this stuff is pretty cool, and I’ve learned a lot about it, but I’m not an expert on climate change yet. I'm learning as we go. We the Children is a shared journey of discovery, where your thoughts, questions, and ideas matter just as much as mine. Sustainability, plastic pollution, weather emergencies – they're not just terms; they're pieces of a puzzle we're solving together.


Let's embrace our curiosity, ask the questions that need asking, and, together, work towards a greener, more sustainable world because we, the children, can shape a sustainable and thriving Earth for generations to come.


Please visit wethechildrenpodcast.com for more information and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts!


Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

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Kids & FamilyKids & Family

Episodes

Exploring the Arctic (Part II): Climate Conversations on the High Seas
4d ago
Exploring the Arctic (Part II): Climate Conversations on the High Seas
SummaryIn part two of our special We the Children at Sea series, Zach continues his Arctic expedition aboard the National Geographic Resolution, this time focusing on conversations with three remarkable environmental experts. Join us as Alexandra Kristjansdottir, an environmental engineer with a rich global perspective, discusses her role in combating climate change through innovative engineering solutions. She shares personal observations of the alarming changes in the polar regions and emphasizes the need for viewing waste as a valuable resource. Jackie Weston, transitioning from human physiology to a dedicated naturalist, recounts her thrilling journey from guiding grizzly bear tours to studying polar bears in the Arctic. Her stories highlight the interconnectedness of ecosystems and her passion for educating others about wildlife and conservation. Kerstin Langenberger, a polar guide with deep environmental science expertise, shares observations on the rapid transformations in the Arctic. Her viral photo of a thin polar bear brings a stark visual to the discussion, underlining the urgency of addressing global warming.Together, they explore the significant challenges and changes they've witnessed firsthand in the Arctic's fragile environments, providing a powerful testament to the global impacts of local environmental changes.HighlightsAlexandra on environmental engineering and witnessing climate change (00:01:26)Jackie's journey from physiology to polar naturalism (00:06:36)Kerstin's on the visible effects of climate change in the Arctic (00:16:20)Discussion on innovative recycling solutions in Iceland (00:03:07)The role of sea ice in polar bear habitats (00:09:37)Impact of climate change on Arctic wildlife and ecosystems (00:17:22)Connect with UsSubscribe to We the Children on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/wethechildrenpodcast) and Instagram (@we_the_children_podcast). Also, please visit our website (wethechildrenpodcast.com) and leave us a voice message or email if you want to stay in touch or engage with episode questions! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Exploring the Arctic (Part I): Conversations on Marine Science and Conservation
Jun 18 2024
Exploring the Arctic (Part I): Conversations on Marine Science and Conservation
SummaryIn this special bonus episode, join Zach on a journey to the Arctic with National Geographic and Lindblad Expeditions, exploring Norway, Greenland, and Iceland. Aboard the National Geographic Resolution, Zach meets marine biologists Taylor Simpkins and Eva Prendergast to discuss their essential research on seaweed, ocean plastics, climate change, and marine mammal conservation.Taylor and Eva are two National Geographic scientists working to raise awareness about the environmental challenges facing the Arctic, and the role we all play in reducing the impact of plastic pollution and climate change in the region. While underscoring the importance of marine conservation and the critical role science communication plays in improving our stewardship of the natural world, Taylor and Eva also share innovative solutions and cutting edge technological advancements with Zach.From the vital role kelp forests play in capturing carbon, to the effects of climate change on polar habitats, this episode underscores how one of the planet's most remote areas is experiencing changes that resonate much closer to home.Enjoy, and join We the Children at sea next time for part two of this series.Links:Lindblad ExpeditionsTaylor SimpkinsEva PrendergastHighlights:All aboard the National Geographic Resolution (00:00)The Plastic Nurdle Problem (03:48)Importance of Kelp Forests in Carbon Sequestration (05:17)Innovative Solutions: Bioplastics from Seaweed (07:46)Impact of Climate Change on Polar Habitats (19:12)How to Classify Whales (13:45)The Unicorn of the Sea, Narwhals (18:18)Role of Scientific Communication in Environmental Protection (24:03)Connect with us!Subscribe to We the Children on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/wethechildrenpodcast) and Instagram (@we_the_children_podcast). Also, please visit our website (wethechildrenpodcast.com) and leave us a voice message or email if you want to stay in touch or engage with episode questions! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Voices for Change: The Power of Storytelling in Climate Action with Matt Scott
Jun 4 2024
Voices for Change: The Power of Storytelling in Climate Action with Matt Scott
Summary:Zach interviews Matt Scott, the Director of Storytelling and Engagement at Project Drawdown. Matt discusses his journey from feeling disconnected from the climate movement to becoming a pivotal voice for inclusivity and representation. He emphasizes the importance of “passing the mic” to underrepresented voices in the climate conversation, arguing that diverse perspectives are crucial for developing effective and inclusive climate solutions. Matt’s work focuses on amplifying stories from communities that are often overlooked, ensuring that their contributions and insights are recognized and valued.Matt shares his experiences working with various organizations, including NASA and the White House. He reflects on a transformative moment at a climate conference where he realized the power of personal stories over data-heavy presentations. This experience inspired him to create impactful narratives that resonate emotionally and inspire action. Matt’s storytelling approach highlights the humanity behind climate data, making the complex issue of climate change more relatable and engaging for diverse audiences.Throughout the episode, Matt provides examples of how storytelling has made a difference in his work, from connecting with underrepresented communities to creating the Global Solutions Diary, a community-generated library of climate solution stories from around the world. This initiative allows people from various backgrounds to share their experiences and solutions, fostering a sense of global community and collective action. Matt’s dedication to amplifying diverse voices and his belief in the transformative power of storytelling serve as a powerful reminder that everyone has a role to play in addressing climate change.Links:•Project Drawdown•Ayanna Elizabeth Johnson•Drawdown’s Neighborhood•Global Solutions DiaryHighlights:The Role of Storytelling in Climate Change (01:21)The Importance of Diverse Voices (03:55)Matt's Work with NASA and Project Drawdown (05:59)Understanding Project Drawdown (08:17)The Climate Action Venn Diagram (16:24)Environmental Justice Explained (24:59)Global Solutions Diary (26:40)Future of Project Drawdown (30:19)Embracing Our Superpowers (33:38)Connect with us!Subscribe to We the Children on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/wethechildrenpodcast) and Instagram (@we_the_children_podcast). Also, please visit our website (wethechildrenpodcast.com) and leave us a voice message or email if you want to stay in touch or engage with episode questions! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Green Futures: Corporate Sustainability Insights with Becky Martin
May 21 2024
Green Futures: Corporate Sustainability Insights with Becky Martin
Explore the role of corporations in the fight against climate change with Becky Martin, a sustainability manager at Toyota Motor North America. In this episode, we learn about Toyota’s ambitious goals for achieving carbon neutrality and the innovative projects they are spearheading to reduce their environmental footprint.Becky Martin’s journey from investment banking to a career in sustainability is an inspiring tale of following one’s passion to make a significant impact. With a strong background in business and environmental science, Becky is at the forefront of Toyota’s sustainability initiatives, focusing on renewable energy, biodiversity, and strategic partnerships with organizations like the Jane Goodall Institute's Roots & Shoots program.Join us as Becky discusses the critical importance of corporate responsibility, the intricate processes behind carbon offsetting, and Toyota’s efforts to align with global biodiversity frameworks. Learn how one of the world’s largest corporations is tackling climate change. What lessons we can all learn from their approach?Listen along with your friends, parents, and teachers as Becky explains the complexities of sustainability in the corporate world and shares her vision for a greener future.Highlights:- Becky’s career path to sustainability (02:45)- Understanding corporate contributions to climate change (04:32)- The importance of biodiversity and Toyota’s initiatives (07:30)- How Toyota aims to achieve carbon neutrality (09:50)- Becky’s work with the Jane Goodall Institute (14:32)- Advice for entering the sustainability sector (16:17)- The future of sustainability and Becky’s hopes for the planet (18:10)- Wrap Up & Quiz! (19:25)Links:- Toyota Motor North America Sustainability- Jane Goodall Institute's Roots & Shoots Program- Carbon Offsets, IllustratedConnect with us!Subscribe to We the Children on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/wethechildrenpodcast) and Instagram (@we_the_children_podcast). Also, please visit our website (wethechildrenpodcast.com) and leave us a voice message or email if you want to stay in touch or engage with episode questions! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Working Together: A United Approach to Climate Solutions with Tim Martin
May 7 2024
Working Together: A United Approach to Climate Solutions with Tim Martin
Uncover the intricate connections between geology and climate change with geologist and astronomer Tim Martin. Tim, a seasoned instructor at Elon University and naturalist with National Geographic, shares insights from his Arctic expeditions and his extensive research into Earth's geological past.Growing up with a passion for the outdoors and a curiosity about the natural world, Tim’s lifelong commitment to environmental education shines through as he discusses the vital role of geologists in understanding climate change. Tim's dual career as a scientist and artist enriches his approach to teaching and communicating about climate change. His work emphasizes how geological evidence from millions of years helps us comprehend and address the rapid environmental changes we face today. Tim explains the science of paleoclimatology and its importance in predicting future climate scenarios.Tim explains the significant financial implications of ignoring climate change, emphasizing that the costs of inaction far outweigh the investments required for sustainable solutions. The episode paints a vivid picture of the economic, environmental, and social stakes involved in global climate dynamics. Tim also illustrates the critical role of interdisciplinary research and public participation in shaping our response to environmental challenges.HighlightsThe science of paleoclimatology and its relevance to modern climate issues (00:02:13)Discussion on the rapid pace of climate change and its economic implications (00:07:01)The importance of combining various scientific disciplines to address climate challenges (00:13:11)How individuals can contribute to climate science through citizen science initiatives (00:20:28)Personal observations and their impact on understanding and combating climate change (00:24:13)Educational Wrap Up & Quiz to reinforce the episode's themes (00:29:26)Resources MentionedNational Geographic Resolution (website link)Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) (website link)Connect with us!Subscribe to We the Children on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/wethechildrenpodcast) and Instagram (@we_the_children_podcast). Also, please visit our website (wethechildrenpodcast.com) and leave us a voice message or email if you want to stay in touch or engage with episode questions! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Hope Rising: Youth Empowerment and Ocean Restoration with Philippe Cousteau
Apr 23 2024
Hope Rising: Youth Empowerment and Ocean Restoration with Philippe Cousteau
Join Zach and environmental advocate Philippe Cousteau in a captivating discussion on the urgent role of ocean restoration and the power of youth activism in environmental conservation. Philippe shares innovative techniques for coral restoration that have transitioned from experimental stages to significant global projects aimed at rebuilding healthy marine ecosystems. Zach and Philippe also talk about the pervasive issue of plastic pollution, discussing both its catastrophic impacts on marine and human life and the solutions that organizations like EarthEcho are spearheading to mitigate these effects.Philippe Cousteau dives into how his family legacy continues to inspire his environmental advocacy, particularly in empowering the next generation. He highlights initiatives such as the OurEcho Challenge, which encourages youth to explore and address biodiversity concerns within their communities, fostering a proactive approach to environmental stewardship. This episode not only illuminates the environmental challenges we face but also celebrates the promising efforts led by young people worldwide, underlining the profound belief that the younger generation holds the key to sustainable solutions.Philippe emphasize the importance of education and active participation in environmental issues. Philippe's stories and strategies offer a roadmap for listeners who are eager to make an impact, advocating for a united approach where clean air, clean water, and a healthy ocean are seen as fundamental and unifying global priorities.Listeners are encouraged to join the ongoing conversation about ocean preservation and youth activism by following the podcast on social media platforms and participating in community-focused environmental initiatives. This episode serves as a compelling reminder that while the challenges are significant, the opportunities for making a difference are immense.HighlightsPhilippe discusses the origins of coral restoration technology and its impact on ocean health (01:30)Discussion on the pervasive problem of plastic in our oceans and innovative responses to this global crisis (15:45)How the OurEcho Challenge is engaging young people in environmental science and stewardship (30:00)Philippe reflects on his grandfather Jacques Cousteau’s legacy and its influence on his life and work (45:20)Strategies for effective environmental communication and the critical role of education in fostering a sustainable future (58:40)Resources Mentioned- EarthEcho International (website link)- OurEcho Challenge (website link)Connect with us!Subscribe to We the Children on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/wethechildrenpodcast) and Instagram (@we_the_children_podcast). Also, please visit our website (wethechildrenpodcast.com) and leave us a voice message or email if you want to stay in touch or engage with episode questions! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Beneath the Waves: The Beauty and Fragility of Marine Life with Molly Timmers
Apr 10 2024
Beneath the Waves: The Beauty and Fragility of Marine Life with Molly Timmers
Dive into the mesmerizing world beneath the waves with Molly Timmers, a marine ecologist whose lifelong passion for the ocean has taken her on an extraordinary journey all around the globe.Growing up with a deep appreciation for nature, Molly's fascination with the ocean led her to pursue a career dedicated to marine research and conservation. From her formative experiences as a marine debris removal technician scuba diving in the pristine waters of Hawaii to her current role as a marine ecologist for the National Geographic Society's Pristine Seas program, Molly's commitment to protecting our oceans is evident in every aspect of her work.In this episode, Molly refelcts on the beauty and fragility of marine life. Drawing from her extensive fieldwork and research, she offers insights into the challenges facing coral reefs, the profound impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems, and the pressing need for innovative conservation strategies to safeguard our oceans for generations to come.Listen along with your friends, parents, and teachers as Molly delves into the intricacies of marine ecology, illuminating the wonders of the underwater world while underscoring the critical importance of collective action in preserving our planet's most precious resource – the ocean.Highlights:An underwater world (03:41)How Molly’s work with coral reefs began (05:50)What are coral reefs exactly? (07:21)Understanding organisms through eDNA (08:55)The role do coral reefs play in our global ecosystem  (13:52)What happens as the ocean's temperature warms? (17:35)How no-take zones protect coral reefs (23:37)Wrap Up & Quiz! (28:59)Links:Website: Nat Geo Pristine Sea's ProgramConnect with us!Subscribe to We the Children on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/wethechildrenpodcast) and Instagram (@we_the_children_podcast). Also, please visit our website (wethechildrenpodcast.com) and leave us a voice message or email if you want to stay in touch or engage with episode questions! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
A Conversation with Glaciologist Dr. Heïdi Severstre (Rerun)
Mar 26 2024
A Conversation with Glaciologist Dr. Heïdi Severstre (Rerun)
Today we revisit my conversation with Dr. Heïdi Severstre! Dr. Sevestre is a glaciologist. She is a top science communicator, educator and leads expeditions to cold places every year. Her studies have taken her around the world, but now she dedicates her time to science policy, outreach and research.In this interview, Dr. Sevestre explains how glaciers melting directly affects us all in two ways. The first is that glaciers hold 70% of freshwater reservoirs, which is what we use for everyday water usage. Secondly, when glaciers melt, the sea levels around the world rise. If all the glaciers in the world were to disappear, it would increase sea levels globally by 65 meters or 280 feet. This is important because there are 70 million people living between 0 and 30 feet of elevation. When the ice melts, people will have to adapt and move somewhere else. In order to combat this, we need to burn fewer fossil fuels. The more we burn fossil fuels like coal, gas, etc., the more the planet keeps the heat in and prevents it from going back into space. Our planet keeps getting warmer and has increased by 1.1 degrees Celsius since the pre-industrial revolution. This sounds like a tiny temperature increase, but a 1 degree temperature increase will continually get worse. NASA predicts that if we don’t make changes around the world, the global temperature is on track to rise by 4.5 degrees celsius in 2100.The key to tackling the climate crisis is to stop using fossil fuels as much as we are today. She suggests educating people on these issues and to calculate your own carbon footprint and water consumption. If everyone makes these slow solutions and shares these solutions with positivity and excitement, we can keep fighting to reduce the carbon footprint and stabilize our planet’s temperature.Website: Dr. Heïdi SeverstreInstagram: @heidisevestreConnect with us!Subscribe to We the Children on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/wethechildrenpodcast) and Instagram (@we_the_children_podcast). Also, please visit our website (wethechildrenpodcast.com) and leave us a voice message or email if you want to stay in touch or engage with episode questions! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Water Wisdom: A deep dive into wildfires and water conservation with Dr. Faith Kearns
Mar 12 2024
Water Wisdom: A deep dive into wildfires and water conservation with Dr. Faith Kearns
Summary:For the most arid areas of our planet, water conservation and wildfires have always been hot topics. Climate change and a warming planet, however, have escalated this important conversation. It is now more necessary than ever to understand the impacts climate change will have on our water supply and weather, and come up with strategies to address them.Having grown up in Arizona, one of the driest places in the United States, our guest this episode hasn't just learned about the importance of water conservation—she's lived it! Dr. Faith Kearns is a scientist and science communication practitioner who writes, works on, and talks about water, wildfire, and climate change issues in the southwestern United States. Author of the award-winning book Getting to the Heart of Science Communication, her work has been published in New Republic, On Being, Bay Nature, and more. Dr. Kearns is also co-host of the podcast "Water Talk."In this episode, we'll learn about the interconnectedness of water conservation and wildfires, and explore the effects climate change is having on both. We'll also explore the concept of "eco emotions" and how to communicate about climate change effectively and compassionately.Listen along with your friends, parents, and teachers as we share discussion questions and helpful definitions…there’s even a quiz at the end of the episode to practice what you learned. Now, let's all take a deep breath and plunge into the world of water conservation with Dr. Faith Kearns!Highlights:Dr. Kearns' childhood experience with wildfire (03:00)How are water conservation, drought, and wildfires connected? (07:12)Water's importance for humans and agriculture (09:35)What is science communication? (18:21)"Eco emotions" and climate-related anxiety in young people (21:15)Creative solutions to address drought and water conservation (24:34)How can individuals promote water conservation locally? (28:48)Wrap Up & Quiz! (30:24)Links:Website: Dr. Faith KearnsBook: Getting to the Heart of Science Communication by Faith KearnsBook: All the Feelings Under the Sun by Leslie DavenportPodcast: Water TalkConnect with us!Subscribe to We the Children on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/wethechildrenpodcast) and Instagram (@we_the_children_podcast). Also, please visit our website (wethechildrenpodcast.com) and leave us a voice message or email if you want to stay in touch or engage with episode questions! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Bee Sustainable: Saving our planet’s pollinators with Melanie Kirby
Feb 27 2024
Bee Sustainable: Saving our planet’s pollinators with Melanie Kirby
Summary:Bees and other pollinators have an important role to play in our planet's ecosystems. As they travel flower to flower collecting pollen, not only are they feeding themselves, but they're feeding us as well. By helping plants reproduce, bees ensure we have an abundance of the fruits, vegetables, and nuts that fuel our food chains. But that's not all...the honey bees make serves as both a sweet treat and a medicine.Bees take care of us, and in return we need to take care of them. Human activities and climate change are having a negative impact on bee populations globally, so our guest this episode, interdisciplinarian and beekeeper Melanie Kirby, is here to teach us all about bees and what we can do to help them thrive.Melanie is the co-founder of Zia Queenbees farm, which specializes in breeding regionally-adaptive bees. A Fulbright-NatGeo Storytelling Fellow, and a Grist 50 Climate Fixer with a graduate degree in Entomology, she advocates for broadening the narrative of marginalized farmers and communities as a mestiza of mixed Indigenous ancestry. Melanie collaborates across cultures and landscapes promoting whole system approaches to pollinator conservation with diverse communities and is a writer, researcher, artist, and mom. In this episode, we'll learn about different bee species and their habits, the impact of climate change on bees, and what we can do to support the health of local bee populations.Listen along with your friends, parents, and teachers as we share discussion questions and helpful definitions…there’s even a quiz at the end of the episode to practice what you learned. So, join Zach as We the Children gets the latest buzz on bees from Melanie Kirby!Highlights:Melanie's introduction to beekeeping (03:09)The importance of bees and pollinators in ecosystems (03:34)How Melanie connects culture and beekeeping (09:00)Bee types and traits (10:53)How health and habits (16:46)Impact of climate change on bees (23:45)How we can protect bees (26:01)Lessons we can learn from bees (31:22)Wrap Up & Quiz! (32:52)Links:Website: Zia Queenbees Farm & Field InstituteLinkedIn: Melanie KirbyInstagram: @nectarnomadBee City USAConnect with us!Subscribe to We the Children on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/wethechildrenpodcast) and Instagram (@we_the_children_podcast). Also, please visit our website (wethechildrenpodcast.com) and leave us a voice message or email if you want to stay in touch or engage with episode questions! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
On Thin Ice: Following Polar Bears to the Frontlines of Climate Change with Elisabeth Kruger
Feb 13 2024
On Thin Ice: Following Polar Bears to the Frontlines of Climate Change with Elisabeth Kruger
Summary:Polar bears have been a symbol of climate change for a long time—and for good reason. Their icy home in the Arctic is warming much faster than the rest of the planet, affecting the habits and lifestyle of polar bears and other Arctic residents in a big way. With these changes come new challenges for both polar bears and people alike.This week, we meet one of the experts leading the charge to help polar bears, humans, and other Arctic wildlife navigate these changes—World Wildlife Fund's Elisabeth Kruger.As WWF’s Manager of Arctic Wildlife, Elisabeth Kruger works at the forefront of conservation, mitigating threats to the marine wildlife of Alaska. Over the last 13 years, Elisabeth has worked with WWF to help polar bears and other Arctic marine mammal populations thrive alongside people in what’s becoming an increasingly warmer and ice-free Arctic.In this episode, we'll learn about the unique characteristics that make polar bears well suited to the extreme climate of the Arctic, find out how climate change is affecting polar bears' habits and creating conflict with their human neighbors, and discover the vital importance of Arctic conservation efforts.Listen along with your friends, parents, and teachers as we share discussion questions and helpful definitions…there’s even a quiz at the end of the episode where you can show off what you've learned! So, join Zach as We the Children visits the icy Arctic to learn about Arctic conservation and polar bears with Elisabeth Kruger!Highlights:Elisabeth on the challenges and beauty of living in extreme environments (03:17)How is climate change uniquely impacting the Arctic and creating challenges for polar bears? (04:24)Elisabeth's memorable polar bear encounter (08:33)Polar bear adaptations and characteristics (10:47)Local Weather Report! (16:23)Global polar bear conservation efforts (17:56)Why is it difficult to estimate polar bear populations? (22:44)How has climate change increased the potential for conflicts between humans and polar bears? (26:11)Indigenous knowledge and arctic food security (28:04)Wrap Up & Quiz! (31:47)Links:Guest Bio: WWF WebsiteLinkedIn: Elisabeth KrugerWWF Wild Classroom: Polar Bear Curriculum Connect with us!Subscribe to We the Children on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/wethechildrenpodcast) and Instagram (@we_the_children_podcast). Also, please visit our website (wethechildrenpodcast.com) and leave us a voice message or email if you want to stay in touch or engage with episode questions! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Ready to Run the World: Laetania Belai Djandam on Student Activism, Climate Advocacy & Community Building
Jan 31 2024
Ready to Run the World: Laetania Belai Djandam on Student Activism, Climate Advocacy & Community Building
When we think about protecting our environment for future generations, the job at hand seems really big. Huge, even. But what if the solutions to these problems start with actions that seem kind of small? What if parents and teachers start getting kids engaged with the natural environment in their own communities from a young age?This week, we meet Laetania Belai Djandam, a 22 year-old Indonesian Indigenous environmental activist. She was raised to care for her local landscape and people, with the understanding that if similar dedication was applied by everyone around the world, the Earth would be in a much better state.A member of the Dayak tribe, her main focus areas are Indigenous land rights, climate justice, and climate intersectionality. A 2023 University of Sheffield graduate, she earned a Bachelor of Medical Sciences, Health and Human Sciences, and has worked for organizations like Healthcare Without Harm to create a more equitable and sustainable world through planetary health. She believes that young people are creating positive change in the world and that right here, right now, powerful people are listening to what youth are saying about how we use and misuse our natural resources. In this episode, we’ll cover all of that, plus lessons about why Indigenous land rights are so significant, how to detect “youth washing,” and why connecting with your own community is crucial in securing support for climate advocacy. Belai shares her own journey with us and offers empowering advice to anyone feeling too small to make a big difference.Listen along with your friends, parents, and teachers as we share discussion questions and helpful definitions…there’s even a quiz at the end of the episode to practice what you learned. Highlights:Learning about Belai’s homeland and Dayak heritage (2:29)How to increase climate curriculum in schools (9:44)Local Weather Report: Bogor, Indonesia (12:35)Why indigenous land rights are such an important issue (13:43)What is climate intersectionality? (20:18)Youth empowerment but also “youth washing” (24:57)Climate advocacy career advice (29:30)Links:Belai on LinkedInBelai on InstagramArticle: Why This Youth Climate Activist Insists on the Importance of JoyConnect with us!Subscribe to We the Children on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/wethechildrenpodcast) and Instagram (@we_the_children_podcast). Also, please visit our website (wethechildrenpodcast.com) and leave us a voice message or email if you want to stay in touch or engage with episode questions! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Healthier Dirt, Healthier People: Digging into Sustainable Agriculture with Gabe Brown
Jan 16 2024
Healthier Dirt, Healthier People: Digging into Sustainable Agriculture with Gabe Brown
SummaryIf farmers update the way they grow food and raise livestock, can we all eat better and also fight climate change? Yes we can! There’s a sustainable farming approach called regenerative agriculture, which argues that by improving soil health, our food would be more nutritious and we’d improve biodiversity, limit air pollution, and literally heal the Earth.  Gabe Brown is a regenerative agriculture advocate who lives in Bismarck, North Dakota, where he and his family operate Brown's Ranch. He found his way to regenerative agriculture after the family farm he took over from his in-laws began failing. He turned things around by leaving age-old agricultural methods behind, and regenerated the farm using holistic management practices.Since then, Gabe's become a huge advocate for soil health. He's written a book, he's featured in documentaries, and he travels far and wide to teach people about regenerative agriculture. In this episode we’ll explore soil health, sustainable farming, weather and air pollution’s impact on farming, the need for more eco education and awareness, and how the food choices we make as consumers affect the environment we share on Earth.Listen along with your friends, parents, and teachers as we share discussion questions and helpful definitions…there’s even a quiz at the end of the episode to practice what you learned. So, join Zach as We the Children digs into soil health and sustainable farming with Gabe Brown!Highlights:How financial disaster led Gabe to more productive and sustainable farming (02:37)Six principles of soil health (03:56)Why old ways of farming lead to “desertification” (9:38)What happens when synthetic fertilizers and pesticides enter the food chain? (12:29)Are more farmers embracing regenerative agriculture? (15:40)Is eating sustainably more expensive? (23:43)Links:Brown’s RanchBook: Dirt to Soil: One Family’s Journey into Regenerative AgricultureFilm: Common GroundVideo: Gabe Brown - Bismarck, NDVideo: Gabe Brown: Keys To Building a Healthy Soil Connect with us!Subscribe to We the Children on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/wethechildrenpodcast) and Instagram (@we_the_children_podcast). Also, please visit our website (wethechildrenpodcast.com) and leave us a voice message or email if you want to stay in touch or engage with episode questions! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
We The Children - Educators Talk Climate Curriculum
Sep 8 2023
We The Children - Educators Talk Climate Curriculum
Welcome to the We The Children podcast, the podcast where kids talk climate change! The show is hosted by your resident kid, Zachary. He may be 11 years old, but he has big concerns for our future - concerns about how decades and even centuries of our forebears have done damage to our planet and profited at the expense of our future. Each week, we will discuss the most pressing climate issues and meet climate warriors who are working to protect our planet. You’ll get wacky weather reports, play fun trivia games, and learn ways that you can make a difference in your community. We may not have all the answers, but we will fight for climate solutions!  Today’s episode is all about Climate Curriculums with Eve and Jeremy from Community Roots Academy School in Southern California. Eve Fein is CRA’s Co-Founder and Executive Director of Operations and Research Development. She was a major force behind opening Community Seedlings Preschool. Jeremy Cavallaro is CRA’s Co-Founder and Executive Director of Education. Both of them wanted to provide quality education that was free. They shared a passion for project-based learning and realized there was no K-8 school like this in Orange County. The school is now so popular that they have to conduct a lottery for enrollment each year. Environmental sustainability has been a core value of the school since it opened. Students are taught to love and connect to the natural world before they are shown the importance of healing its wounds. The two major skills they are taught in project-based learning are advocacy and efficacy. Next, Eve and Jeremy offer their best advice for weaving environmental literacy and climate awareness into existing curriculums in schools without a specific program. From Jeremy’s experience, these lessons must come from a place of passion. It is all about building passion and compassion in children. They also recommend their favorite books and films on the subject. CRA is lucky to be surrounded by such a beautiful natural space, but urban cities don’t usually have the same opportunity for connecting students with nature. However, Jeremy reminds listeners that small things such as a tree, planted flowers or a windowsill box of herbs all can have a major impact when tended to with care. Links:Learn more about Community Roots Academy SchoolLearn more about We The Children.Reach out to us https://www.instagram.com/we_the_children_podcast/ Thanks for listening! And always remember, if we act together, we the children, can inspire hope and create change for our climate Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
We The Children - Community Building for Climate...by Kids
Jun 7 2023
We The Children - Community Building for Climate...by Kids
Welcome to the We The Children podcast, the podcast where kids talk climate change! Theshow is hosted by your resident kid, Zachary James. He may be 11 years old, but he has bigconcerns for our future - concerns about how decades and even centuries of our forebears havedone damage to our planet and profited at the expense of our future. Each week, we willdiscuss the most pressing climate issues and meet climate warriors who are working to protectour planet. You’ll get wacky weather reports, play fun trivia games, and learn ways that you canmake a difference in your community. We may not have all the answers, but we will fight forclimate solutions!Today’s episode is all about conservation with Shawn Sweeney, Associate Vice President ofCommunications and Policy at the Jane Goodall Institute. His career has spanned many yearsof combining his passion for the environment, research, and community relations. He shares thatwhile he has worked in conservation for about 15 years, his work in the field really began bystudying animal behavior and conservation psychology in college. He became aware of howblack-capped capuchin monkeys, were treated in the wild and the extinction they faced. He studied animal behavior at the College of Wooster and got to work on some really cool projects there. He shares hishistory of being a nature and wildlife champion. Shawn is a storyteller in his role at the JaneGoodall Institute. He emphasizes the importance of knowing your audience as a communicator.During college, Shawn was introduced to Roots & Shoots when they visited a local high school.He was so inspired by the power of the group that he started his very own on campus. Then,people were just beginning to talk about these conversations around sustainability and theclimate crisis. Jane Goodall began Roots & Shoots to give young people the opportunity tomake a difference in their own communities. They have developed a 4-step formula for youngpeople to follow in order to generate the most impact possible. Next, Shawn shares how youngpeople can get started on their own projects within their communities. These include identifyinga problem, utilizing community mapping and designing a project of your own. Shawn alsoshares how the Roots & Shoots team have leveraged Dr. Jane’s gift of storytelling to create aframework and training for the entire team. When telling these stories, it is important torecognize and give credit to the person who did the work in order for the story to be told. Beforewrapping up, he explains the oppressive systems in place which create unhealthy conditions forhumans and animals alike. Changing these systems is the key to fighting climate change andspecies extinction, and Shawn has hope for younger generations and the power of community.Links:Learn more about Shawn Sweeney and Roots & Shoots.Learn more about We The Children.Reach out to us @wethechildrenpodcastThanks for listening! And always remember, if we act together, we the children, can inspirehope and create change for our climate! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
We The Children - Habits of Waste
Apr 28 2023
We The Children - Habits of Waste
Welcome to the We The Children podcast, the podcast where kids talk climate change!  The show is hosted by your resident kid, Zachary James.  He may be 11 years old, but he has big concerns for our future - concerns about how decades and even centuries of our forebears have done damage to our planet and profited at the expense of our future.  Each week, we will discuss the most pressing climate issues and meet climate warriors who are working to protect our planet.  You’ll get wacky weather reports, play fun trivia games, and learn ways that you can make a difference in your community.  We may not have all the answers, but we will fight for climate solutions!  Today’s episode is all about wasteful habits with Sheila Morovati. Shelia is the founder of the amazing nonprofit Habits of Waste, which seeks to find and implement waste reduction solutions both locally and on a national scale. After a wacky weather report about how we can combat climate change with nature itself, Sheila is welcomed to the show. She is known for her success in reducing waste at restaurants by throwing out crayons kids use to entertain themselves. This was her first initial step into environmental work. She shares the story behind how she initially came up with this idea when she observed her own daughter tossing the crayon she just briefly used in the garbage. She began to collect the crayons herself before getting the restaurant in on the task to collect these lightly used crayons and donate them to schools. Small lifestyle changes ultimately amount to big changes. When we make these incremental changes in our own life, it becomes easier and easier to keep making positive changes. Sheila was involved in the banning of plastic straws in Malibu, the first city to do so. She encourages listeners to attend their own city council meetings to advocate for the positive change they believe in. She also urges listeners to incorporate more plant based foods into their diet rather than making a full jump to strictly vegan. Before wrapping up, she shares how listeners can help contribute to the work being done at Habits of Waste. This includes making sure you have no single-use waste in your daily lunches, raising money for Habits of Waste or establishing a crayon collection at your own school. Finally, she voices her biggest concerns about climate change. Links:Learn more about Sheila Morovati. Learn more about Habits of WasteLearn more about #8mealsLearn more about Lights, Camera, Plastic?Learn more about the Crayon CollectionLearn more about We The Children.Reach out to us @wethechildrenpodcastThanks for listening!  And always remember, if we act together, we the children, can inspire hope and create change for our climate! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
We The Children - Glaciers, We're on Thin Ice
Apr 6 2023
We The Children - Glaciers, We're on Thin Ice
Welcome to the We The Children podcast, the podcast where kids talk climate change! The show is hosted by your resident kid, Zachary James. He may be 11 years old, but he has big concerns for our future - concerns about how decades and even centuries of our forebears have done damage to our planet and profited at the expense of our future. Each week, we will discuss the most pressing climate issues and meet climate warriors who are working to protect our planet. You’ll get wacky weather reports, play fun trivia games, and learn ways that you can make a difference in your community. We may not have all the answers, but we will fight for climate solutions!  On today’s episode, Zach interviews guest Dr. Heïdi Sevestre. She obtained her PHD from the University of Oslo. She is a top science communicator, educator and leads expeditions to cold places every year. Her studies have taken her around the world, but now she dedicates her time to science policy, outreach and research. Dr. Sevestre is French and was born in the French alps. She fell in love with the mountains and knew from the age of 16 that she wanted to be a glaciologist. Dr. Sevestre is currently in Svalbard, which is in the center of climate change and permafrost, which is any ground that stays permanently frozen for two years. This place is covered with snow and ice everywhere year round, but the sea ice covering most of the arctic ocean has retreated. When temperatures increase, the permafrost thaws, which causes buildings to shift and releases greenhouse gasses. Dr. Sevestre says seeing polar bears and other arctic animals is magnificent, but the arctic is rapidly changing and is directly affecting them. Polar bears hunt from the sea ice and if that totally disappears, then these animals will be affected. Dr. Sevestre explains how glaciers melting directly affects us all in two ways. The first is that glaciers hold 70% of freshwater reservoirs, which is what we use for everyday water usage. Secondly, when glaciers melt, the sea levels around the world rise. If all the glaciers in the world were to disappear, it would increase sea levels globally by 65 meters or 280 feet. This is important because there are 70 million people living between 0 and 30 feet of elevation. When the ice melts, people will have to adapt and move somewhere else. In order to combat this, we need to burn fewer fossil fuels. The more we burn fossil fuels like coal, gas, etc., the more the planet keeps the heat in and prevents it from going back into space. Our planet keeps getting warmer and has increased by 1.1 degrees Celsius since the pre-industrial revolution. This sounds like a tiny temperature increase, but a 1 degree temperature increase will continually get worse. NASA predicts that if we don’t make changes around the world, the global temperature is on track to rise by 4.5 degrees celsius in 2100. The key to tackling the climate crisis is to stop using fossil fuels as much as we are today. She suggests educating people on these issues and to calculate your own carbon footprint and water consumption. If everyone makes these slow solutions and shares these solutions with positivity and excitement, we can keep fighting to reduce the carbon footprint and stabilize our planet’s temperature. Finally, Dr. Sevestre and Zach engage in a round of climate-related trivia and Zach shares the action step of the week: switch to a more plant-based diet to reduce your carbon footprint. Links:Learn more about Heïdi Sevestre. Learn more about We The Children.Reach out to us @wethechildrenpodcastThanks for listening! And always remember, if we act together, we the children, can inspire hope and create change for our climate! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
We The Children - Uncovering your "One Green Thing"
Feb 23 2023
We The Children - Uncovering your "One Green Thing"
Podcast: We The ChildrenEpisode: Episode 11 - Heather WhiteWelcome to the We The Children podcast, the podcast where kids talk climate change! The show is hosted by your resident kid, Zachary James. He may be 11 years old, but he has big concerns for our future - concerns about how decades and even centuries of our forebears have done damage to our planet and profited at the expense of our future. Each week, we will discuss the most pressing climate issues and meet climate warriors who are working to protect our planet. You’ll get wacky weather reports, play fun trivia games, and learn ways that you can make a difference in your community. We may not have all the answers, but we will fight for climate solutions!  Today’s episode is all about Heather White, author of One Green Thing. After a wacky weather report about understanding volcanic activity, we turn to our interview with Heather White. Heather is also the founder of One Green Thing, a nonprofit with the focus on finding practical ways to solve the climate crisis and help others turn climate anxiety into climate optimism. Growing up in eastern Tennessee, Heather spent lots of her childhood partaking in outdoor activities. It wasn’t until college that she focused on environmental science, working on Capitol Hill and in various political campaigns. Having children is what ultimately inspired her to write this book and take her climate action to the next level. Heather explains that climate anxiety is a new term recently defined by the Oxford Dictionary as a chronic fear of environmental doom. Climate optimism, on the other hand, focuses on the solutions we have to address these threats. With all of these solutions, what is really missing is the political will to take action. The premise of Heather's book is that older generations have an ethical duty to prove to young people that they are not alone in the fight to save our planet. So, how can implementing small daily changes really make an impact? Heather explains that the entire idea of individual carbon footprint was created by PR executives from the oil industry to try to shift the burden of the climate crisis onto people, rather than products. As humans on this earth, we all have the ability to inspire others to think about regular environmental impacts and solutions. When we inspire a ripple effect, we can together create the change our world needs. Next, Heather shares her top tips for families to reduce waste at home: reduce food waste, be mindful of the brands you are buying, invest in energy efficiency and ask young people how they feel about the future. Finally, Heather and Zach engage in a round of climate-related trivia and Zach shares the action step of the week: talk to your parents about your climate concerns. Links:Learn more about Heather White. Learn more about book One Green ThingTake your Service Superpower AssessmentLearn more about We The Children.Reach out to us @wethechildrenpodcastThanks for listening! And always remember, if we act together, we the children, can inspire hope and create change for our climate! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.