PODCAST

Hops and Box Office Flops

Wobam Entertainment

A film podcast dedicated to the underdogs — the disasters, the bombs, the much maligned! So sit back, grab a beer, and enjoy!
Terminator Genisys – Rotten Member Berries
Terminator Genisys is a hodgepodge of ideas from more beloved Terminator films. It gives us the gruff and tough Sarah Connor, as well as the sleek and dangerous T-1000; and it even features an Arnold versus Arnold face-off in 1984 amid the familiar backdrop of the original T-800's arrival. There's only one issue: None of it particularly works. Terminator Genisys feels more like half-baked fan fiction than it does a coherent narrative. Thus, despite how much we all love those elements and moments from the prior movies, they come across as shameless pandering here. Pair that with a convoluted script that hops through time more often than Dr. Sam Beckett, and it's a recipe for reboot disaster. Now, it's not all bad. There are some good ideas in Terminator Genisys. Establishing connective technology as sort of a Trojan horse for Skynet is not without its merits. But, there is just so much happening that is uninteresting. With two leads (Emilia Clarke as Sarah Connor and Jai Courtney as Kyle Reese) who lack even a semblance of chemistry, those flaws become even more apparent. Hence why this movie bombed with critics and domestic audiences. It sits at 27% on Rotten Tomatoes with 274 reviews; and it grossed just $89.7 million in North America. Its global cume helped it save face ($440.6 million), but it was still not enough to keep it out of the red. Listen, you could watch this, but these versions of the characters won't be back. So come with us if you want to drink some future-infused Spaten Optimator, while hunting down those goddamn time traveling robots! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Capt. Cash, and Chumpzilla are tumbling through time in our birthday suits! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – Woof ... where to begin? Never has a movie failed so hard to grasp what made the fans love the characters of its series. (00:00)Lingering Questions – The Double Turn Podcast heads to 1997 to prevent the Montreal Screwjob, and then we discuss what could've fixed this travesty. (53:23)The "Judgement Day" Trivia Challenge – We hear from our brothers in beer at Hop Nation USA, and then I challenge the field to trivia about the movie. (1:19:11)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We kick off "Hops and Jingle Bell Flops" with a movie that will make you root for the burglars, Home Sweet Home Alone! (1:32:23) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—the aborted sequels and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
3d ago
1 hr 38 mins
The Rocketeer – The Antifa Adventurer that isn’t Dr. Jones
The Rocketeer is a beloved 1991 Disney film. Based on Dave Stevens' comic series, which debuted in 1982, it revolves around stunt pilot Cliff Secord's (Bill Campbell) fortuitous discovery of a jetpack created by Howard Hughes. Of course, adventure ensues. The character was created as a tribute to the 1930s serials that had inspired wonder in the youth of their day. Both the comics and film execute that homage perfectly. The Rocketeer is indeed a cult classic. Loaded with charm—which is anchored by the majestic score of James Horner—it serves as a delightful reminder of the comic book films of yesteryear. Those films had to rely far less on CGI and far more on making the viewers organically believe in the magic they were presenting. They also had a much slimmer margin for error. They weren't the commodity they are now, so there wasn't an excess of "superhero" cinema. Unfortunately for The Rocketeer, it failed to take flight at the box office. It grossed just $46.7 million on a budget of $40 million, sending the sequel plans to the crap heap. The good news: Despite some dodgy green screen here and there, it remains a very enjoyable time; and its enduring appeal seems to be leading to a sequel series for Disney+! So sit back, blast off with a Hazecraft IPA from Great Lakes Brewing Co., and don't let Lothar snap you in half! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Capt. Cash and two special guests are punching Nazis and crashing zeppelins! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – 30 years later, The Rocketeer still packs plenty of fun. (00:00)Lingering Questions – The Double Turn Podcast tunes up the band, and then we discuss why this film should've soared, rather than crashed, at the box office. (56:16)The "Rocket Man" Trivia Challenge – We hear from our brothers in beer at Hop Nation USA, and then Capt. Cash challenges the field to trivia about the movie. (1:14:42)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We finish off "Hops and Attempted Franchise Flops" with the least self-aware Skynet creation, Terminator Genisys! (1:22:10) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—the upcoming reboot and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Nov 26 2021
1 hr 30 mins
Snake Eyes – Crapped Out
Snake Eyes continues the unfortunate legacy of the legendary G.I. Joe toys on film. As in, it's not particularly good, nor was it successful. Snake Eyes, like many films nowadays, is meant to serve as an origin story for its titular hero, but also as an introduction to a larger universe. We get appearances from Cobra's Baroness, as well as the classic Joe Scarlett. The issue is they don't necessarily fit. They are crammed into what's already a messy film. Thus, they are shortchanged and underdeveloped. What is developed is the film's inability to make Snake Eyes, played by Henry Golding, particularly endearing. From the jump, his motivations and behavior establish him as almost a villain, especially when compared to Tommy, future Storm Shadow (Andrew Koji). In more trustworthy hands, Snake Eyes' dilemma and traitorous actions may have seemed tortured, something the audience could empathize with. The script here just doesn't allow for that. Instead, he comes across as a jerk for nearly the entire runtime. It's honestly one of the stranger attempts at a Hero's Journey I've ever seen. Couple that with a shaky cam that even Paul Greengrass would find offensive, a MacGuffin too stupid for even Cobra Commander to want, and a gaggle of giant snakes not murdering Jon Voigt, you've got yourself a fairly painful night at the movies. Critics and audiences seem to agree. With 170 reviews, it sits at 36% on Rotten Tomatoes; and it grossed a measly $40.1 million on a budget ranging from $88 to $110 million. That, folks, is disastrous. Anyway, now you know and knowing is half the battle. So sit back, kanpai with an Asahi Super Dry, and don't jump into the snake pit! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, and Capt. Cash are overstuffing fish with guns for the Yakuza! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – Seems like an odd choice to make Snake Eyes the least likable character in your Snake Eyes movie. (00:00)Lingering Questions – We hear from our brothers in beer at Hop Nation USA, and then we offer our ideas for which cartoon episode or arc would make a great movie. (33:20)The "Three Challenges of the Warrior" Quiz – The Double Turn Podcast gets DQ'd because of outside interference, and then I challenge the field to trivia about the movie. (56:23)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We continue "Hops and Attempted Franchise Flops" with the beloved 90s flick The Rocketeer! (1:06:21) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—the Hasbro Movie Universe and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Nov 19 2021
1 hr 15 mins
The Lone Ranger – Wendigo Hammer
The Lone Ranger is a modern adaptation of the popular 1930s radio series, as well as the late 1940s/1950s television show. It features a masked hero, the titular one, and his trusty Native American sidekick, Tonto. After decades of inaction, Disney went big to bring the duo back. They re-teamed Gore Verbinski with Johnny Depp—who’d collaborated on the first three Pirates of the Caribbean movies; and they essentially wrote the director a blank check. In retrospect, that was a mistake, as was Depp’s baffling decision to play Tonto. With a budget ranging from $225 to $250 million, its modest $260.5 million take was disastrous for the House of Mouse. Depending on who you ask, the project lost them anywhere from $100 to $200 million. As for Depp, his decision to portray a Native American did little to quell the murmurs of the film’s problematic production. And it certainly only shed more negative light on the project. In the end, the mileage for this movie will vary for most viewers. It’s overlong, convoluted, a tonal rollercoaster, and lacks a charismatic lead. Armie Hammer, as The Lone Ranger, has less acting chops than his horse. But it also boasts incredible set pieces, gorgeous visuals, and a bit of the quirky charm that made the Pirates films so much fun. So sit back, grab your tin star and a Lone Star, and prime that silver bullet! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, and Capt. Cash are avoiding bad trades with railroad shysters! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – Johnny Depp as an eccentric character seems like his forte, but not this time around. (00:00)Lingering Questions – Our brothers in beer at Hop Nation USA offer a toast to progress, and then we assess where it all went wrong for Tonto and co. (57:28)The "Hell on Wheels" Challenge – The Double Turn Podcast uses the ivory leg as a foreign object, and then Chumpzilla challenges the field to trivia about the movie. (1:23:03)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We continue "Hops and Attempted Franchise Flops" with the latest G.I. Joe debacle Snake Eyes! (1:30:17) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—the spooky route this movie nearly went down and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Nov 12 2021
1 hr 36 mins
Dune – Spice Up Your Life
Dune, based upon Frank Herbert's classic 1965 novel, has been done before on both big screen and small, but never to this scope or scale. Denis Villeneuve—given the resources and technology—has crafted a faithful and awe-inspiring interpretation of the novel's first half. Thankfully—based upon recent remarks—Paul Atreides' adventure will not end here. This is literally half a story. And without the rest, it would not stand particularly well on its own. Unlike something like Zack Snyder's Justice League—which has a definitive ending, despite teasing more—Paul's story in this film ends on a cliffhanger. We won't spoil it here, as we do over the pod, but Baron Vladimir Harkonnen and his ilk have some serious comeuppance coming. Anyway, if you're not familiar with Dune, this movie's fade to black may either leave you jaded or hungering for more. It sort of depends on your appetite for sweeping science fiction epics; because, although this is a marvel to look at, it does throw a lot at you. Whether it is the Bene Gesserit testing Paul with the Gom Jabbar or it's relative lack of context to the mystery of Spice, Dune is not the most friendly film for non-fans of the book. That aside, this is definitely a voyage worth taking. It may even inspire you to seek out Herbert's other works in the series. Reading is super cool, and so are Dave Bautista and Jason Mamoa. The Spice must flow! So sit back, avoid the oppressive desert heat with a Corona Light and don't make a deal with the treacherous Baron! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, and Capt. Cash are getting Spicy with the Freman! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – How was Villeneuve's much anticipated adaptation of the classic novel? (00:00) The spoilers begin at 10:15. Lingering Questions – The Double Turn Podcast hits us with some Spice to the eyes, and then we debate whether the ending of Dune's first chapter worked. (45:43)The "Gom Triviar" Challenge – Our brothers in beer at Hop Nation USA imbibe in the Baron's finest ales, and then Capt. Cash challenges the field to trivia about the movie. (1:05:59)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We begin "Hops and Attempted Franchise Flops" with the recently even more problematic The Lone Ranger! (1:13:37) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—the extended lore of Frank Herbert's Dune and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Nov 5 2021
1 hr 21 mins
Club Dread – Naughty Cal
Club Dread—Broken Lizard's follow up to Super Troopers—is a riff on 80s slasher films; and it boasts a cast of characters that are eclectic, dumb, horny, and ripe for the picking. This, of course, is anchored by the Broken Lizard crew. There's Dave, the drug-addled DJ (Paul Soter); Putnam, the buttoned-up tennis coach (Jay Chandrasekhar); Sam, the chief of the Fun Police (Erik Stolhanske); Lars, the smooth-operating new masseuse (Kevin Heffernan); and Juan, the promiscuous dive coach (Steve Lemme). Their characters here are wildly different from their respective turns in Troopers, and not all are created equal. There are a few swings and misses in the bunch. That is entirely forgiven, though, by the presence of Bill Paxton as "Coconut" Pete. Paxton's Pete—a Jimmy Buffet-esque singer living out his days on his hedonistic vacation island—is just a treasure. The character is wonderfully realized. From album covers, to candid photos, to actual songs, the work the Broken Lizard crew put into crafting Pete is incredible. His vinyl greatest hits is actually available for purchase (I may or may not have bought it). That performance owns the film and is probably responsible for why it's now a cult classic. Its need for that status is actually surprising. Despite the massive popularity of Troopers, Club Dread fell flat on its face at the box office. On a budget of $8 million, it earned just $7.6 million. It was also diced up by critics. With 101 reviews, it sits at 29% on Rotten Tomatoes. To hell with them, this movie is a bloody good time; so sit back, slug down one of Cutwater's Pina Coladas, and don't ask "Coconut" Pete to play Margaritaville! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, Capt. Cash, and Mayor McCheese are never gonna lose those tails! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – How does Broken Lizard's sophomore effort fare? (00:00) Lingering Questions – The Double Turn Podcast stops by for some drinking Pacman, and then we choose out favorite moments and lines from the film. (44:51)The "Ponytails, Cocktails" Trivia Challenge – Our brothers in beer at Hop Nation USA offer libations for the slain staff, and then Mayor McCheese challenges the field to trivia about the movie. (1:05:25)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We take a trip to Arrakis with Denis Villeneuve's highly anticipated Dune. Let the spice flow! (1:13:18) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—the majesty of "Coconut" Pete's music and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Oct 29 2021
1 hr 22 mins
They Live – All Out of Bubblegum
They Live is a bonafide cult classic. And it works not only as a critique on rampant consumerism and Reagan-era economics, but also as a guilty pleasure action movie. The premise is simple: Nada—played by "Rowdy" Roddy Piper—is awakened to the horrific reality the world is actually living in through the lenses of special sunglasses. That world is one run by an unknown alien race, who are bleeding humans dry and lulling them into complacency through the content they absorb. Television, billboards, magazines, and even money all instruct people to do as they are told—to not think or have imagination. Carpenter's intentions are about as subtle as a Roddy Piper clothesline, but that doesn't make them any less resonant. Even if you have never seen They Live, you have no doubt seen its messaging. OBEY, one of the subliminal missives the aliens feed to humans to keep them compliant, is just part of the pop culture zeitgeist. Thus, despite earning just over $13 million during its theatrical run, They Live has lived on. And its conceit is just as relevant today as it was in 1988. Now sit back, BUY some Bubble Farm IPA from Clown Shoes, and CONFORM to our collective sense of humor! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, Capt. Cash, and Mayor McCheese are here to chew bubblegum and kick ass ... and we are all out of bubble gum! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – They Live is a potent social commentary wrapped up in glorious 80s action. (00:00) Lingering Questions – Our brothers in beer at Hop Nation USA ask you to DRINK 8 Hours, and then we rank the Carpenter classics to appear on the pod. (48:50)The "OBEY" Trivia Challenge – The Double Turn Podcast orders you to CONSUME more pro wrestling, and then I challenge the field to trivia about the movie. (1:05:21)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We sip on some pina coladas with "Coconut" Pete. That's right, "Hops and Floptober" heads to Pina Coladaburg with Club Dread. (1:14:52) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—Carpenter's reflections on the movie and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Oct 22 2021
1 hr 24 mins
Event Horizon – Brain Dead Space
Event Horizon was Paul W.S. Anderson's follow up to Mortal Kombat. At the time, he was highly sought after. In the wake of that movie's success, he was offered the sequel to MK and even an X-Men film, amongst other things. Wanting to veer away from PG-13 fare, Anderson settled on Event Horizon. The basic premise of the film is that a salvage crew is dispatched to secure the titular ship, the Event Horizon, which has been missing for seven years. What they find is not something they will ever un-see, even if they don't need eyes to do so. Why? Well, in the ship's journey through the pockets of space, it took a detour. As a result, its original crew slaughtered each other, bathing in blood and doing other unsightly things. This is a hard R, folks, and we don't even get the majority of the insanity he wanted to include. That last bit is unfortunate because, ultimately, Event Horizon feels like an unfinished film. Its slapdash editing, done over the course of just six weeks, is unable to hide its story flaws. It's not surprising then that the film was trashed by critics (29% on Rotten Tomatoes with 79 reviews); and failed to recoup its pricey $60 million budget, grossing just $42 million. Despite that, it is a pseudo-cult classic. Online fans have even attempted to insert what's left of the lost footage to build a director's cut the studio will never release. Its intense visuals, strengthened by dynamite sets and practical effects, also elevate what are mostly pedestrian scares. So sit back, unearth the cosmic horrors of a Hell Lager from Surly Brewing, and get off that ship! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, Capt. Cash, and Mayor McCheese are doing our best to avoid the creepy Dr. Weir as he prances naked around the Event Horizon! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – Pitched as "The Shining in space," Event Horizon can't quite reach the lofty heights of its comparison. (00:00) Lingering Questions – We hear from our brothers in beer at Hop Nation USA, and then determine what could've improved this movie. (1:02:24)The "Save Yourself from Hell" Trivia Challenge – The Double Turn Podcast enters a wormhole to Hell, and then Chumpzilla challenges the field to trivia about the movie. (1:23:02)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We get rowdy for "Hops and Floptober" with the John Carpenter classic, They Live.  (1:31:20) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—the lost footage and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Oct 15 2021
1 hr 39 mins
Tin Cup – Bland Trap
Tin Cup re-teams director Ron Shelton with his Bull Durham star Kevin Costner. The pairing, which was stellar in 1988’s Durham, fails to rediscover the magic of that film. That’s primarily because Roy McAvoy, the titular Tin Cup, just isn’t likable. He’s an obtuse man-child—much more akin to “Nuke” Laloosh than “Crash” Davis. And his foibles, which are on full display throughout, are never adequately addressed. One would be justified in arguing that his growth arc may actually be a negative one. Despite that, there is fun to be had on the back nine, especially if you ignore the forced romance sub-plot; and Tin Cup is at its best when it’s tapping into the more spirited aspects and nuances of golf. In addition, its ending holds to this day. McAvoy’s insistence on going for it all amplifies what could have been just a typical sports movie. That boldness is probably why critics appreciated it (72% on Rotten Tomatoes with 53 reviews). Audiences did, too. Though not a huge success, Tin Cup did manage to rake in $70+ million on a budget of $45 million. We’d say that’s at least a box office par. Now sit back, grip and rip the top off a Modelo Negra, and define the moment! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, Capt. Cash, and Mayor McCheese are letting the big dog eat! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – Tin Cup works very hard to stretch the limits of Kevin Costner's charm. (00:00) Lingering Questions – We hear from our brothers in beer at Hop Nation USA, and then assess whether this movie ended appropriately. (53:14)The "Golden Tassle" Trivia Challenge – The Double Turn Podcast shanks one out of bounds, and then Chumpzilla challenges the field to a series of questions relating to the movie. (1:09:17)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We begin "Hops and Spooky Flops" with the long-gestating episode, Event Horizon.  (1:24:55) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—the inspiration for Tin Cup's infamous 12 and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Oct 8 2021
1 hr 25 mins
Ed – Monkey Trouble
Ed is a movie centering around a chimpanzee who just so happens to be exceptional at baseball. As a concept, that sounds ridiculous, but kids movies have worked with that conceit—take Air Bud as an example. But Ed is a travesty. Plain and simple. It's unfunny, nonsensical schlock, and it probably killed the notion that Matt LeBlanc could be bankable as a leading man. The film's failings are not his fault. As devoid of charm as he may be in it, it's just a rudderless enterprise. Other than the novelty of a chimp—who once belonged to Mickey Mantle—having a golden glove, there's a distinct lack of focus. Ed ping pongs between plot points we've seen in other movies. Universally, they were done better elsewhere. It even shoehorns in a romantic subplot between Ed's raucous bowel movement jokes. One wonders how they found the time. It should come as no surprise then that Ed was panned by critics. It sits at 0% on Rotten Tomatoes with 16 reviews. It also tanked at the box office. On a budget $24 million, it made just over $4 million. This thing is like hitting into an unassisted triple play. Now sit back, ease the pain of watching Ed with a Golden Monkey from Victory, and keep the chimp away from your bathroom! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, and Mayor McCheese are stuffing our faces full of frozen bananas! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – Ed loves farting, frosty treats, and assorted hijinks. Sounds hilarious, right? It's not. (00:00) Lingering Questions – We hear from our brothers in beer at Hop Nation USA, and then make the difficult choice: Is this the worst movie we've ever done? (57:23)The "Houdini of the Hot Corner" Trivia Challenge – The Double Turn Podcast drops a sacrifice bunt, and then Chumpzilla challenges the field to a series of questions relating to the movie. (1:12:27)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We conclude "Hops and Sports Ball Flops" with the golf classic Tin Cup! (1:24:55) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—Matt LeBlanc's anger over appearing in the film and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Oct 1 2021
1 hr 33 mins
Side Out – Sponsored by MetLife
Side Out—which stars C. Thomas Howell and Peter Horton as Monroe Clark and Zack Barnes—is the quintessential beach volleyball movie. There is a distinct lack of competition in that field, but regardless, it is a 1990s filmmaking delight. The central conceit of Side Out is that Clark, an aspiring lawyer, comes to California to intern for his uncle Max—an unscrupulous attorney who's always out for money. This fortuitously leads him to Barnes, an aging and disgraced former "King of the Beach." From there, it's magic. All of it. From the Kenny Loggins needle drop, to the ultra 90s aesthetic, to the incredible montages, Side Out is so bad it actually transcends its absurdity and attains greatness. Honestly, I'm clearly in the minority on this. Side Out grossed well under $1 million on a budget of $6 million—a cost apparently offset by its insane amount of product placement. It also bankrupted one of the studios that backed it. But, who cares!? We're here for the sand, beers, and babes! And this movie has an abundance of those. Plus, there is enough neon and Mossimo apparel to make your head spin. So sit back, relax by the ocean with a California Honey Blonde Ale from Pizza Port Brewing Co., and take a tour of the dead stars! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, and Mayor McCheese are entering the Jose Cuervo Classic for a shot at glory! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – Side Out is perhaps the greatest beach volleyball movie ever, though that is admittedly not saying much. (00:00) Lingering Questions – We hear from our brothers in beer at Hop Nation USA, and then we tackle Side Out's most enduring mystery: Does Zack Barnes conquer his crippling gambling addiction, or does he squander his new found winnings? (42:48)The "King of the Beach" Trivia Challenge – The Double Turn Podcast sets us up for a spike, and then I challenge the field to a series of questions relating to the movie. (1:03:18)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week, honor the late Norm Macdonald, and next up: We continue "Hops and Sports Ball Flops" with the all-star chimpanzee shortstop Ed! (1:13:21) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—the odd amount of volleyball video games and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Sep 24 2021
1 hr 23 mins
The Program – Place at the Table
The Program is a highly embellished glimpse at the perils of big time collegiate football. The prioritization of wins over the actual molding of young minds is at its center, but so is football's innate ability to form lasting bonds. The men who take the field put their bodies on the line for each other. It's a brotherhood. It nails both of those aspects. The shadiness of the folks in charge is omnipresent; and the central cast of characters is relatable. Their foibles, as cliché as they may be, are distinctly human. You've got the young upstart running back Darnell Jefferson (Omar Epps), whose education entering college isn't up to snuff. There's the overachieving special teams player, Lattimer (Andrew Bryniarski), who has bulked up through suspect means for a chance to start. And then, perhaps the most well rounded of the core, are linebacker Alvin Mack (Duane Davis) and quarterback Joe Kane (Craig Sheffer). Kane is an alcoholic who's struggling with the pressures associated with a Heisman campaign. And Mack is a season away from pro stardom and the type of money that can change his family's fortunes forever. Yes, all the scandals, drama, and injury, sack this team at once, but none of them are beyond the realm of belief. This is high level college football—warts and all. And, honestly, their journeys are why this movie has endured. The physicality of football is also well represented, a testament to the work done by the folks at NFL Films. It immerses you in the game and the atmosphere. Thus, despite its more outlandish elements, The Program is a film that has stood the test of time and remains widely regarded as a cult classic. Poor reviews, controversy, and a lukewarm box office couldn't prevent it from becoming so. Now sit back, crush some Dankful IPAs from Sierra Nevada, and get ready to peel some caps! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla and Capt. Cash are putting the women and children to bed, so we can go looking for dinner! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – Is the program overexaggerated? Sure. But it's certainly pulling back the curtain on the more unsightly elements of college football. (00:00) Lingering Questions –  Is it even possible to improve this movie? (47:03)The "Kill 'Em All" Trivia Challenge – Chumpzilla challenges the field to a series of questions about the movie. (1:10:46)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We continue "Hops and Sports Ball Flops" with the beach volleyball classic Side Out! (1:21:59) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—ESPN's oral history and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Sep 10 2021
1 hr 28 mins
Last Man Standing – No, Not the Tim Allen Show
Last Man Standing is the American reimagining of Akira Kurosawa's Yojimbo (1961), though it wasn't the first reinterpretation. The Spaghetti Western A Fist Full of Dollars (1964) had tread this ground before—a man with no name caught up in the exacerbating violence of warring gangs. Unlike the Italian-produced film, Last Man Standing was given Kurosawa's blessing. Unfortunately, it can't replicate either of its predecessors results. Directed by Walter Hill, it's a movie that struggles mightily to present a coherent story. Sure, it revolves around Irish and Italian mobsters vying for bootlegging dominance in a remote Texas town, but what happens around that is often nonsensical. That is no fault of the director's. Last Man Standing, like many other films we've covered, fell victim to the demands of the studio. Nearly 30 minutes of its original runtime was sent to the editing room floor. Its lack of connective tissue is made evident by John Smith's (Bruce Willis) forced bits of narration. The muddled narrative no doubt hurt its critical reception. With 30 reviews, it sits at 37% on Rotten Tomatoes. It's also the biggest financial failure of our "Hops and Bruno Flops" series. On a budget of $67 million, it grossed just $47.3 million. Yet, and this may be a stretch, some now consider it a cult classic. That is all credit to its gratuitous violence. Smith, the pseudo-hero of the film, dishes out lead in hefty amounts—rarely stopping to breather or even reload. As ludicrous as the gunplay is at times, it does make Last Man Standing a moderately enjoyable endeavor. Now sit back, sip on a cool Furious IPA from Surly Brewing Co., and tip your hat to the undertaker! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Capt. Cash, and Mayor McCheese are running moonshine through Mexico with Colt pistols in hand! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – When Bruce Willis strolls into a gang war in Prohibition-era Texas, bullets fly. (00:00) Lingering Questions – Somewhere out in the ether, a director's cut of this movie exists. Would we like to see it one day? (53:47)The "Jericho" Trivia Challenge – I challenge the field to a series of questions about the movie. (1:07:56)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We kick off, literally, "Hops and Sports Ball Flops" with The Program! (1:18:08) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—Walter Hill's reflections on his films and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Aug 31 2021
1 hr 23 mins
Hudson Hawk – Scat Burglar
Hudson Hawk is as bold a movie as an A-list star could possibly choose to make. And that's a compliment. Bruce Willis, most famous for playing gruff cop John McClane, stars as cat burglar Eddie Hawkins—the titular Hudson Hawk. He's tasked with stealing artifacts crafted by Leonardo da Vinci that are capable of turning lead into gold. On the surface, that sounds like a fairly standard action-centric plot. What it actually entails is anything but. Hudson Hawk boasts a deluge of slapstick tomfoolery; dynamic duets between Willis and Danny Aielo, who plays his partner Tommy Five-Tone; a secret com device crafted out of a crucifix; and a gaggle of candy-themed thugs—one of which is played by the generally self-serious David Caruso. Unfortunately, its charms weren't embraced upon its release. It grossed a shade under $100 million on a budget of $65 million; and it was scorched by critics. Its 33% on Rotten Tomatoes is unkind, but it's not nearly as mean as all the Razzie nominations Hudson Hawk received. This isn't high art, folks, but Willis is having an absolute blast. Provided you don't take it too seriously, you will, too. Now sit back, harmonize your way through an Atomic Pumpkin from New Belgium Brewing, and catch some air in the ornithopter! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, and Capt. Cash are swinging on a star! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – Hudson Hawk is a bizarre delight, but it's certainly not for everybody. (00:00) Lingering Questions – In the pantheon of actors' passion projects, where does this rank? (1:07:30)The "Side by Side" Trivia Challenge – Capt. Cash challenges the field to a series of questions about the movie. (1:13:25)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We finish off "Hops and Bruno Flops" with Last Man Standing—no, not the Tim Allen Show! (1:22:02) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—how Hudson Hawk came to be and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Aug 27 2021
1 hr 28 mins
Cop Out – Bruce is Too Old for This S**t
Cop Out is a humorless retread of the buddy cop trope. Directed by Kevin Smith, though not written by him, it lacks the key ingredient to this tried and true formula—charismatic leads. Bruce Willis, as Jimmy, sleepwalks through the entire film. Tracy Morgan, as his partner Paul, tries dutifully to carry his lifeless husk across the finish line. But, alas, he cannot. No amount of improv or overacting can inject life into the flat script. More than likely, Willis' on-set tantrums and open disdain for Smith's direction played a role in Cop Out's failures. He just didn't commit to the material, which forced Morgan to overcompensate. It should come as no surprise then that critics and audiences hated it. It sits at 19% (163 reviews) and 39% with them respectively. And, like Andy Pafko did 477 times in his career, it struck out at the box office. It earned just $55.6 million on a budget of $40 million. Yet, in the end, Cop Out's biggest sin is how negatively it affected Smith. The experience shook him, nearly causing him to abandon making movies all together. Thanks, Bruno. Now sit back, pound several Summer Ales from Brooklyn Brewery, and stop spying on people with a nanny cam! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, and Capt. Cash are on a stakeout dressed as cellphones! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – Kevin Smith's shot at the big time lacks the laughs of his own scripts. (00:00) Lingering Questions – What, if anything, could fix this film? (34:04)The "Andy Pafko" Trivia Challenge – Chumpzilla challenges the field to a series of questions about the movie. (58:16)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We continue "Hops and Bruno Flops" with Hudson Hawk—the movie that once again graced us with the angelic pipes of Bruno! (1:10:04) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—the on-set turmoil and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Aug 20 2021
1 hr 15 mins
The Suicide Squad –  Passion Fruit Starfish
James Gunn's The Suicide Squad, which is a pseudo-sequel to 2016's film, is an unapologetic, Troma-inspired, super heroic gore fest. And it is glorious! This is Gunn's superhero magnum opus. He dives deep into DC's bag of obscure characters to assemble a ragtag group of expendable heathens. Make no mistake, many of these oddballs are here to die. And they do so in a series of grotesque ways. This is a hard R, folks. Unlike Birds of Prey or Zack Snyder's Justice League, which could've curbed their foul language to earn a PG-13, The Suicide Squad basks in the magnificence of its unfettered violence. Bullets are sprayed, a man is murdered with his pants down—literally—and a dimwitted humanoid-shark feasts on all manners of fascist goons. Heads not only roll, they're eaten! Unfortunately, with COVID's resurgence, The Suicide Squad was a box office casualty. It netted just $26.5 million domestically in its opening weekend. Fortunately, though, like all of WB's 2021 slate, you can stream it in all its disgusting glory on HBO Max. We highly recommend you do so. So sit back, struggle your way through a Milwaukee's Best Premium, and throw the Weasel a life raft! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK) and Chumpzilla are storming the beach guns blazing! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – Does Gunn's film wash out the bitter taste of its predecessor? (00:00) General Impressions and Initial Questions – We engage in a spoiler-free discussion about DC's latest big screen team-up. (8:08)Lingering Questions – Where does this rank in the DCEU? Who's our favorite of this entry's additions? We tackle those questions, among others, in our second segment. (27:04)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We continue "Hops and Bruno Flops" with the Kevin Smith-directed Cop Out. Yes, even Mr. Smith acknowledges it's a turd. (59:38) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—the Peacekeeper series and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Aug 13 2021
1 hr 7 mins
A Good Day to Die Hard – Davai Hard
Die Hard is arguably the greatest action movie ever made. A Good Day to Die Hard, on the other hand, is a soulless husk that's related to the prior entries in name only. Certainly, the character of John McClane, Bruce Willis, became progressively more absurd with each sequel. He'd gone from isolated cop, surviving on instinct and guile, to literally a super human battling a fighter jet on a highway. In A Good Day to Die Hard, that trend continues. Worse, though, there's just no story or a compelling villain to balance it out. The plot of this movie makes no sense—not even a semblance of it. It's so stupid, in fact, that its twists and turns will just aggravate you. That's not an exaggeration. Everything that happens is blatantly obvious, which is a problem on multiple levels. One, knowing what's coming creates a dearth of suspense. Two, and this was mentioned above, the things that happen are utterly nonsensical. When you factor in the lack of character development, an unending headache ensues. Jack McClane sucks. It's like the creative well of McClane kid angst was so exhausted by the prior film that Jai Courtney's Jack is just reduced to a cacophony of whining. The same can be said for the action. There are inspired bits, to be sure, but for the most part, it's just Robo-McClane standing directly in the line of fire as he massacres the hapless Russian henchman who dare face him. It's all so ludicrous. Critics and audiences took note of these issues. At just 15% with 231 reviews on Rotten Tomatoes, it's by far the worst reviewed entry. It's also the lowest grossing of the Die Hard films domestically, taking in just $67.3 million. It did make its money back overseas, but its poor critical reception doomed the franchise going forward. Well, enough of that negativity. Sit back, pop the top on a White Russian Imperial Coffee Stout from Sun Up Brewing Co., and heartily cheer "здоровье" [zda-ró-vye]! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, Capt. Cash, and Mayor McCheese are competing for the gold in the Chernobyl Diving Championship! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – A convoluted mess, A Good Day to Die Hard shames the franchise! (00:00)  Lingering Questions – After this, is it worth attempting to revitalize the character of John McClane? (54:32)The "Yipee-Ki-Yay Mother Russia" Trivia Challenge – I challenge the field to trivia about the Die Hard series. (1:11:26)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up, we take a break from "Hops and Bruno Flops" to discuss James Gunn's The Suicide Squad. (1:23:13) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—why Die Hard is a movie that made us and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Aug 6 2021
1 hr 29 mins
F9: The Fast Saga – Space Cars
F9: The Fast Saga—as utterly absurd as it is—is the natural progression of a series that's always running on overdrive. Dominic Toretto, Vin Diesel, and co. were destined for this film's convoluted, bloated, and baffling narrative. Now, those may sound like knocks against it, but that couldn't be further from the truth. I just don't care how illogical the plots of these films have become. They are just too much damn fun. Dom has a secret spy brother? Sure. Why they hell not?! Magnets! How do they work? Doesn't matter. Just bask in the awesomeness of the high octane action! Han, who was killed twice technically in cannon, returns out of nowhere, you say? Bam! Check that shit off of my bingo card and let's roll! That is F9: The Fast Saga in a nutshell. It's bonkers; it's spectacular; and we'll keep watching them as long as they want to make them. And it appears we're not alone. F9: The Fast Saga is cruising its way to well over $600 worldwide; and its doing so faster than a 10-second car at Race Wars. So sit back, sip on a Corona with a slice of lime, and toast to family! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, and Mayor McCheese are living our lives a quarter mile at a time! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – Magnets, cars, and family! (00:00)  Lingering Questions –The Double Turn Podcast cashes in the Money in the Bank briefcase, and then we continue to celebrate the glory of this movie's insanity. (40:41)The "Nothing's Stronger Than Family" Trivia Challenge – Mayor McCheese challenges the field to trivia about the franchise. (56:44)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up, we kick off "Hops and Bruno Flops" with the indescribably bad and disheartening A Good Day to Die Hard. (1:05:42) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—the tangled web of the Fast movies and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Jul 23 2021
1 hr 14 mins
Legend – Glitter and Bubbles
Legend is a bizarre fantasy fever dream—one rife with an excess of pollen, bubbles, and glitter. These things are literally everywhere, folks. They flood the beautiful scenery and are unrelenting. Also unrelenting is the film's glaring lack of plot. If you kill the unicorns, the world will be cloaked in darkness. That's the movie. Jack o' the Green, Tom Cruise, must atone for his mistake of introducing his crush Lili, Mia Sara, to the wonderous creatures by killing the Lord of Darkness, Tim Curry, and taking back the severed alicorn. It's pretty to look at, wildly dumb, and almost entirely remembered for Curry's dazzling turn as the Lord of Darkness. His performance, as well as the make up, are perfection.  Directed by Ridley Scott—who'd just rocked the cinematic world with Blade Runner and Alien—Legend just never lives up to its potential. In 1985, critics and audiences agreed. It boasts a paltry 38% on Rotten Tomatoes with 40 reviews; and it grossed just $23.5 million on a budget of $24.5 million. Technically—and again, solely because of Curry—it is sort of a cult classic, though. So sit back, stab a hole in a Narwhal Imperial Stout from Sierra Nevada with an alicorn, and don't give in to Darkness' temptations! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, Capt. Cash, Mayor McCheese, and a special guest are besting all of Gump's riddles! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – Is the power of nostalgia enough to sustain the pretty, but often hollow Legend? (00:00)  Lingering Questions – After a word from our beer bros at Hop Nation USA, we discuss the greatness of Tim Curry. (1:09:22)The "Is Your Love Strong Enough?" Trivia Challenge – The Double Turn Podcast hits a hot tag, and then Capt. Cash challenges the field to a series of questions about the movie. (1:27:44)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We finish off "Hops and Fantasy Flops" with the absurd, but incredible F9. (1:40:00) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—the Director's Cut differences and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Jul 16 2021
1 hr 48 mins
Krull – Murder Frisbee
Krull is a pseudo cult classic. It's got some kick ass box art and a host of ideas that nostalgia clouds as being awesome. But when revisiting it, neither of those two things amount to much. Why? Well, Krull is chock full world-building. It's got a Cyclops, a cannibalistic spider, horses whose speed creates a trail of flame, and so much more. But none of them are fleshed out all that well; and most of it is just ripped from better properties. And that's because Krull was a cash grab—meant to capitalize on the popularity of those other IPs. Fantasy, in particular space operas, were kind of a thing in the late 70s and early 80s. Premiering just two months after Return of the Jedi, this just never does enough to set itself apart from the things that inspired it. Hence why it made no money—$16.9 million on a budget of $30 million; and why it was trounced by critics—32% on Rotten Tomatoes with 22 reviews. With all that said, if Krull was a movie of your youth—as it was mine—you will still enjoy the hell out of it. Despite all the horrific fight choreography and cringe worthy green screen effects, it still packs plenty of charm.  Now sit back, slash the top off of a Viking Space Probe Hazy Double IPA from Stone Brewing, and mount your Firemare! I, the Thunderous Wizard (@WriterTLK), Chumpzilla, and Mayor McCheese are triumphing over evil with the power of love! This Week’s Segments: Introduction/Plot Breakdown – Krull throws a lot at you, but not much of it is executed well. (00:00)  Lingering Questions – After a word from Hop Nation USA, we analyze why this fantasy failed to hit it big. (1:00:01)The "Not the One with Kevin Sorbo ... Thank God" Trivia Challenge – The Double Turn Podcast sends you for an Irish Whip, and then Chumpzilla challenges the field to a series of questions about the movie. (1:29:32)Recommendations – We offer our picks for the week and next up: We continue "Hops and Fantasy Flops" with Ridley Scott's under appreciated 80s classic Legend. (1:40:50) And, as always, hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to check out all the interesting factoids—the glory of the Glaive and more—from this week’s episode! You can find this episode of Hops and Box Office Flops on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Acast, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Vurbl, and Amazon Music!
Jul 9 2021
1 hr 47 mins

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