The F*ck It Podcast

Caroline Dooner

for chronic dieters & people who struggle with food read less

This Podcast is Ending + The Nervous System with Irene Lyon (again)
Sep 16 2022
This Podcast is Ending + The Nervous System with Irene Lyon (again)
Big update! The chaos is ending. Listen to this episode's intro for the explanation. This podcast is about to become an archive of old episodes, dedicated to The F*ck It Diet. But before it ends, I need one more chaotic moment: having to repost this episode that I already posted last month. Why? After all of that, trying to merge my old podcast into substack, I decided instead, to "split" my podcasts again, and leave The F*ck It (Diet) Podcast as it's own, standalone archive, that's specific to the food healing journey. This way, it will better be able to support new people who are reading the book, or just finding the information for the first time. But because I had the podcast merged for a few months over on substack, there were a few episodes that were posted on the new substack feed, that were not posted on the old feed. My episode with Irene on our nervous systems is one of them, so now that I've "split" the podcasts, it has to be "reposted" over here again, if I want it to be on this feed. And, I think this episode is really relevant to "The Emotional Part" of The F*ck It Diet. So I want it to be here! You may have already listened to my conversation with Irene back when I posted it last month! If that's the case, you can just listen to my new intro where I explain why I'm ending this podcast, and starting fresh somewhere else. My new podcast will be over at carolinedooner.substack.com (there, you can find the actual podcast link listings. So if you want to find my new podcast on spotify or apple, you're going to have to separately follow me over there!) Also! If you've listened to my conversation with Irene already, she is currently enrolling her yearly program Smart Body, Smart Mind through September 19th, 2022. If you've been wanting to go deep on nervous system and trauma work, make sure to check it out. To get some of her trainings for free, check out her free video series (it's like 2 hours worth of video lessons!). My Conversation with Irene Today I am sharing my conversation with Irene Lyon, a trauma expert, educator, and trained somatic practitioner. We talk about some of the basics of the nervous system, the body holding onto trauma, and some myths and misconceptions about how healing works. If you’ve read The F*ck It Diet or Tired as F*ck, you know how passionate I am about this method of healing, even though… I have been thinking about how much I should be getting back into focusing on it... And, as I say at the end of the episode, I actually just now am back into focusing on it. I just took Irene’s 21 Day Nervous System Tune Up. And I love it all so much, that I am now an affiliate for it. What that means is, if you use my link for her program, and sign up, I will get a commission. As I mentioned above, Irene is currently enrolling her yearly program Smart Body, Smart Mind through September 19th, 2022. If you've been wanting to go deep on nervous system work, make sure to check it out! To go through some of her trainings for free, check out her free trauma healing video series (it's like 2 hours worth of video lessons!) You can also find Irene on instagram here. *** If you're reading the F*ck It Diet book and want some structure + extra belief work + bonus content + 32+ hours of video Q&A replays? You can check out my F*ck It Diet Self-Study, it’s the book companion course that uses the book as a text book. Woo.
All of the mistakes I made with Intuitive Eating
Jan 11 2021
All of the mistakes I made with Intuitive Eating
This post and episode is brought to you by my live program, The F*ck It Diet Club. It's only running one time in 2021. Two months of live support, community, video Q&As, daily prompts, weekly beliefs to focus on, and all of us using TFID book as a textbook. Enrollment closes January 14th. Six years before I started my own "F*ck It Diet," I read the Intuitive Eating book by Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch, and decided I was going to heal my eating. I was 18 years old, and I'd already been extreme dieting for over 4 years. I was an extreme dieter, and an extreme binger. My weight violently yo-yo'd up and down every few months. And I was sure I was a food addict. Reading the Intuitive Eating book was the very first time I had any idea that dieting was toxic, and wired to backfire. It spoke to me. I wanted to heal. But I was young, and desperate, and still stuck in extreme self-objectification. I was about to go to school at NYU for Musical Theater, and I also had a lot of health issues that I'd been trying to heal with my extreme diets. I wanted to heal my relationship with food, but I wasn't ready. I also didn't really understand some very important parts of the journey to food and body freedom. Remaining thin was still my top goal, and there was really no way to fully heal while continuing to prioritize weight control. So over the next 6 years, while I thought I was eating intuitively, I was actually not. I was still dieting, and obsessing over my hunger and fullness cues, and calling it "intuitive eating." Then I'd read the books and blog posts from other "mindful eating" gurus, and assume they were continuing my education on intuitive eating, when in reality, they were taking me further and further away from true intuitive eating. Sometimes people read my work and think I'm ragging on Intuitive Eating and saying it doesn't work. I promise you, I am not. Intuitive eating is life changing, evidence based, and the dietitian authors of the book are trail-blazing experts who have changed more lives than anyone could begin to count. But people do misinterpret intuitive eating, en masse. A lot of those people become influencers themselves, and water down the intuitive eating teaching. There are a lot of deeply ingrained diet beliefs that many of us hold, that will keep us from truly eating intuitively, and instead, keep us in a quasi-healed state, where we're still sneakily micromanaging our food intake, which will inherently still keep us obsessed with food, and feeling out of control around food. I made a lot of mistakes during those 6 long years, so I'm sharing those mistakes in the hopes that you won't make the same mistakes I made. Ready???   1. I thought I had to listen really, really closely to my hunger and fullness cues Listening to your body is one thing. It's what we want! But listening obsessively? Not exactly what we want. And not exactly what is gonna lead to a better relationship with food. Here is the thing: after years of dieting, we usually feel REALLY out of control around food, so it makes sense that we assume that we need to pay extreme attention to every bite we take, and our exact level of hunger or fullness. The problem is, we don't trust ourselves or our bodies. We are still operating under the belief that our appetite has to be micromanaged. It actually doesn't. In the beginning of stepping away from diets, we are often extremely hungry, hungrier than we think is ok or healthy or rational. And we think it's a sign that we are out of control, and that our hunger needs to be curtailed. But actually, our hunger needs to be fed. Which brings me to....   2. I thought I would immediately eat a small / "perfect" amount of food Along the same lines, I thought when I started 'eating intuitively' - I'd eat small, perfect intuitive amounts of food. But that is still diet culture. That is still making assumptions about how much we "should" need to eat. Guess what?!?!
Chat with My High School Best Friend: Healing Our Disordered Eating & Diet Culture During Pregnancy
Jan 4 2021
Chat with My High School Best Friend: Healing Our Disordered Eating & Diet Culture During Pregnancy
Today I'm sharing my chat with Annie, one of my very best friends from all the way back in High School. We talk about our disordered eating that started in high school, and how we got out of the diet cycle in our twenties. Annie also just had a baby and has things to say about toxic diet culture during pregnancy. Content Warning: Talk about disordered habits, disordered thoughts, and pregnancy weight gain amounts. Annie's current favorite pregnancy & post-partum accounts: @Drsterlingobgyn @drcassidy @mypelvicfloormuscles @ourmamavillage @prenatalyogacenter @karrie_locher @drnicolerankins @onestrongmamaprenatal Annie also mentioned that if anyone has questions for her about pregnancy/post-partum, they can follow her private instagram @anniebmccarthy and DM her :-) *** Sponsors: -TANYA MARK. Tanya is a non diet nutritionist, body image coach, and she’s professionally certified in Intuitive Eating and Eating Psychology. She gets it. It’s not easy ditching diet culture’s BS messages. And she has a plan for you. If you’re ready to ditch food guilt and body shame for good, grab her free guide: 5 Steps to Stop Feeling Crappy About Your Body & Make Eating Easy. Grab the free guide and get started today. And follow Tanya on Instagram! -SIDE BY SIDE NUTRITION. Side By Side’s dietitians work to empower people to become their own nutrition experts. Their team of health at every size and weight inclusive nutrition therapists work virtually all over the United States - and locally in Colorado. They work both individually with clients of all ages, genders, and diagnoses in addition to running ongoing online groups - including an IE and body image support group, meal support groups, Binge Eating Disorder Support Group, and Restorative Yoga. They put out free weekly content on their YouTube channel, blog, and instagram to help inspire your journey to a trusting and self-compassionate relationship with food and your body. They offer one on one nutrition and body image therapy to those who struggle with eating disorders, disordered eating, chronic dieting, they also take a variety of insurances including the large commercial insurance companies Cigna, Aetna, and United Healthcare. If you are ready work one-on-one, you can email contact@sidebysidenutrition.com or call 708-717-7394. sidebysidenutrition.com
The Problem With (Most) New Year’s Resolutions
Dec 21 2020
The Problem With (Most) New Year’s Resolutions
Today I'm chatting with Kara Loewentheil, host of the Unf*ck Your Brain podcast, and former women's rights lawyer turned Master Certified Coach. And today we chat (mostly) about New Year's resolutions, and why they usually backfire, and how to approach them (if you even want to - which you don't have to want to!!!) Kara's Website Unf*ck Your Brain Kara's Podcast Unf*ck Your Brain   Sponsors!   Tanya Mark is a non diet nutritionist, body image coach, and she’s professionally certified in Intuitive Eating and Eating Psychology. She gets it. It’s not easy ditching diet culture’s BS messages. And she has a plan for you. If you’re ready to ditch food guilt and body shame for good, grab her free guide: 5 Steps to Stop Feeling Crappy About Your Body & Make Eating Easy. Grab the free guide and get started today. And follow Tanya on Instagram!   Lu Uhrich is a  Certified Eating Psychology Coach and Body Image Mentor Lu Uhrich (pronounced YER-ick) and her online course, The Mend Sessions. The Mend Sessions is a self-paced, 10-week course for the woman who’s ready to find food freedom, befriend her body and move on with her life.It serves as a powerful starting point OR a comprehensive refresher for those committed to anti-diet, weight-neutral living. The Mend Sessions is full of downloadable lessons, resources, and worksheets on the topics of intuitive eating, body image, joyful movement, self-compassion, intuition, self-talk, binge and emotional eating and more. Plus you’ll get access to expert interviews, optional community support and monthly Q+As with Lu. To learn more about the Mend Sessions and hear from past participants visit Lu’s website at luuhrich.com. And exclusively for our listeners: Use code “fuckit” at checkout to get $30 off your Mend Sessions enrollment. And follow Lu on Instagram!
What to Say to a Doctor
Dec 7 2020
What to Say to a Doctor
What to Say To a Doctor, when intro-ing anti-diet stuff   This episode's sponsors are Juliette Sakasegawa - Your Empowered Life, and StitchFix (and my desire for as many $25 coupons I can get). More info on both all the way at the bottom 👇🏼   This week I had an appointment with a cardiologist because my dad has a heart condition that can be genetic, so I was being screened for it. Turns out I DON’T have it, but while I lay there getting the echocardiogram he asked me what I did, and I said that I was a writer. "About what?" Sigh, here we gooooo. "I write about diet culture." I don't always know how to approach the subject with people in the medical field who I USUALLY assume will be extremely indoctrinated with food-fearing, weight centric beliefs. I usually tread lightly because I never know how people are going to respond. I said, "I think we have a blind spot when it comes to disordered eating. There's nuance of course, but it is more rampant than we tend to think." He seemed open, and said was interested in hearing more about it, because he is often put in the position of telling people to make changes to their diet, but he knows it’s not his area of expertise. He also said he is rather “atheistic” about diets, and that he is aware that different things work for different people. Which all seemed like a good sign! So he said he may want to follow up with me on the subject so he could learn more. So! I went home and figured out what I would want to say to best intro the subject to someone who is likely entrenched in diet culture already, and a weight-centric paradigm. What I wrote: First and foremost, we have a problematic way of approaching weight in the pursuit of health - or in the pursuit of improved health. There is an assumption that weight is just a simple calorie math equation, and that is inaccurate for lots of people who have naturally higher weight set ranges, genetically or because of underlying health issues- and that belief leads to a dysfunctional way of approaching weight and weigh loss, and often leads to a dysfunctional relationship with food, that will ironically lead to poorer health outcomes long term. This hyper-focus on weight is a cultural issue first and foremost, but what we tend not to understand, is that health habits can and do change people’s overall health for the better, often without any change in weight. When there is a change in weight, longterm, thanks to better health habits, it’s usually because the dysfunctional relationship with dieting (and often bingeing in response to dieting) has been healed.  There is a lot of talk about people having a “food addiction” or “sugar addiction” which doesn’t actually have data to back it up - in fact the studies that show food addiction actually starve and restrict the subjects (rats) beforehand, and then the rats act food addicted, and it lights up pleasure centers of the brain (that also light up with things like hugs and playing with puppies). So the “addiction” part is actually the consequence of the restriction. Simply… restriction leads to something that looks a lot like food addiction, and then often starts a viscous cycle. Another issue is the lack of fluency around the social determinants of health, as well as how much weight cycling, not weight alone, accounts for a lot of health issues- and weight cycling is a direct results of attempted weight loss. The following quotes are pulled from this article: Weight Science: Evaluating the Evidence for a Paradigm Shift, and if you want to find the references for the quotes below, they can all be found at that link above by going to the referenced study number below. "Ob*se people who have had heart attacks, coronary bypass [50], angioplasty [51] or hemodialysis [52] live longer than thinner people with these histories [49]. In addition, obese senior citizens live longer than thinner senior citizens [53]. " "Weight cycling can account for all of the excess mortality assoc...
Laziness Does Not Exist
Nov 23 2020
Laziness Does Not Exist
Today I'm chatting with the author of the upcoming book Laziness Does Not Exist, Dr. Devon Price. Most of us think of ourselves as inherently lazy - but what if we are just tapped out? Burnt out? Overworked? Overwhelmed? And what if laziness is actually just... normal? Protective? Even... helpful? There is almost always a pretty legit reason we *feel lazy* whether it be mental health struggles, not having the support we need, or just... being burnt out. Did you know that the 40 hour work week is too long? And studies show that the max work time you can really "get" out of people is 3-4 hours a day??? YEA!!! Listen to this one. Find Devon on instagram Devon's website Laziness Does Not Exist   Sponsors! SIDE BY SIDE NUTRITION. Side By Side’s dietitians work to empower people to become their own nutrition experts. Their team of health at every size and weight inclusive nutrition therapists work virtually all over the United States – and locally in Colorado. They put out free weekly content on their YouTube channel, blog, and instagram to help inspire your journey to a trusting and self-compassionate relationship with food and your body. They work both individually with clients of all ages, genders, and diagnoses in addition to running groups -including a body image group and binge eating group. They offer one on one nutrition and body image therapy to those who struggle with eating disorders, disordered eating, chronic dieting, they also take a variety of insurances including the large commercial insurance companies Cigna, Aetna, and United Healthcare. If you are ready work one-on-one, you can email contact@sidebysidenutrition.com or call 708-717-7394. sidebysidenutrition.com   Topaz Trauma Healing. Often, anxiety, depression, body disconnection, substance use, and negative self beliefs can actually be trauma responses, and a sign that there is trauma to process in your healing journey. If you are interested in exploring trauma work, Caroline Pegram is a SLC based licensed clinical social worker and somatic practitioner - for anyone new to the concept, somatic work is about accessing healing by feeling and getting back into the body, and is very effective for addressing trauma. Through her practice Topaz Trauma Healing, she offers online tele-mental health therapy and somatic work to folks across the country. Her approach is centered around  embodied presence, empathy, connection, and deep listening. Her work is attachment-focused, which helps to reshape relationship patterns. She is also inspired by polyvagal theory, an approach to create a sense of safety using the nervous system. Caroline embraces a HAES framework, is motivated by restorative justice, and is allied with those who are LGBTQQIA identifying. She works with ages 13 and up, as well as families who are seeking a safe environment to take up space. If you are curious about integrating this kind of work into your healing journey, you can connect with Caroline through her instagram @topaz.healing or visit her website at www.topaztraumahealing.com