Peak | The Psychology of Performance

Larry G Maguire

A show about the psychology of human performance from coaching psychologist and writer Larry G. Maguire. On Peak | The Psychology of Performance, you can get tips and advice on how to improve your results in work, business, sport, the arts, career and all domains where human beings perform. We’ll examine aspects of performance such as wellbeing, behaviour, expertise, intelligence, habits, perception, attention, confidence, cognition and emotion. Learn to manage performance anxiety, cope under pressure and produce consistently higher-level performance at work and in sport with the psychological skills of experts. Read more at theperformatist.com read less

[Excerpt] Dr Jonathan Murphy on Work
Jul 27 2021
[Excerpt] Dr Jonathan Murphy on Work
Over lockdown, I had been considering formats for some new content on work. Settling on an audio series, the loose plan was to meet up with people from diverse backgrounds and record our conversations around the question; how do you feel about daily work? So as restrictions eased last month, I nabbed Dr Jonathan Murphy, a former psychology lecturer of mine and now senior executive learning and development at Enterprise Ireland for a chat. Cumiskey's Pub, Dublin 7 was the venue and over several hours we discussed topics such as social media and free speech, Chomsky on academic freedom, the meaning and purpose of work, and in this short clip, the benefits of a psychology degree to all areas of life and work. (No pints - unfortunately!) The following 4 min clip is an intro to the longer publication of our conversation due out in September as part of the series on Work. I'll be asking supermarket workers, barristers, dentists, unemployed people, nurses, and a variety of other professions, how they feel about daily work. Subscribe to The Performatist to receive these personal and sometimes moving conversations. Guest Profile Dr Jonathan Murphy Dr Jonathan Murphy is a learning & development specialist with Enterprise Ireland. A former lecturer and researcher, he currently works with senior business leaders and c-suite teams to enhance their non-cognitive skills and strategic leadership capabilities. His background is in the cognitive neuroscience of learning & memory, decision making, human performance, and entrepreneurship and innovation. LinkedIn | Twitter Transcript Larry (00:00):When you were a kid, what was the goal? What did you want to be? Jon (00:08):I can't honestly remember when I was, like under 10 or 12. I think as a teenager, I dabbled with the idea of being a musician and did the whole thing as a teenager, played in the band and I actually went to college to study that. I studied music and media management at college, and I loved the first year of doing that. And then in second year, I realised as with most things in life that it's going to be who you know in the industry and not what you know. And I think one of the things that I'd tell this advice to anyone coming out of college or anyone in a job that they're not happy with, you know, it's; try and build your network, try and like the importance of human relationships actually getting in and sitting down in front of somebody and building a relationship that way is really, really important. Um, the importance of saying yes to opportunities. So oftentimes we're really busy. We tend to limit what we do. We limit ourselves to stuff that we're comfortable with. I think, one of the things we introduced for final year students was the employability and action module, was going out and doing volunteer work. Now I'm in two minds on volunteer work because I think there are exploited practices that go on there massively in psychology. Huge, right. I wrote an article in the Irish Psychologist in 2017 or 18, that was around the health of academic psychology. And it was [advocating for] making a better future for psychology graduates, and also showing them opportunities outside of academia and outside of the usual stuff. So I can remember, you would have been told in first-year and maybe throughout the degree, would have been all of your various sub-disciplines in psychology, but it wasn't really expressed to an extent it was, but the skills that you develop the way in which you can transfer them over to be very useful in areas of whether it be, project management or whether it be sales roles or whether it be in eh… Larry (02:18):It really is fundamental, isn't it? Like I found that... I mean, I did it the other way around. I had a practical life experience and then went into academia. Jon (02:29):And how did you find that then? Did you find that it was stuff that was completely out of whack with your experience?
EP003 The PERMA Model of Wellbeing
Jun 27 2020
EP003 The PERMA Model of Wellbeing
Read more about The PERMA Model; humanperformance.ie/what-is-resilience In the late 1960s, the father of positive psychology Martin Seligman and his research associate, Steven Maier, were part of a team that discovered the phenomena “learned helplessness." They found that dogs, rats, and mice, when subjected to mild electric shock over which they had no control, would learn to accept it, making no attempt to escape. It was later shown that human beings act the same way. They learn to be helpless. Over many years of research, Seligman and colleagues discovered that about 30% of subjects never become helpless. The reason why, he says, is optimism. Seligman subsequently developed a means to assess responses as either optimistic or pessimistic. They discovered that people who refuse give up, have the habit of seeing setbacks as temporary and changeable. In other words, they feel they can do something about it. The researchers realised they could, as Seligman said, “immunise people against learned helplessness, against depression and anxiety, and against giving up after failure by teaching them to think like optimists.” Over his years of research, Seligman found that the most satisfied, contented people were those who had discovered and exploited their unique combination of what he called “signature strengths,” such as humanity, temperance and persistence and developed the PERMA model of psychological wellbeing. Support my work