Mind Body Plants

Tommy Moore

The Mind Body Plants Podcast, hosted by Tommy Moore, explores the science and philosophy of the human brain and body. Tommy is a qualified Nutritionist and Exercise Scientist, and passionate Spiritual & Mental Health Advocate.

#15 - Tom Earls: Why We Need To Protect Bee Populations
Jun 24 2021
#15 - Tom Earls: Why We Need To Protect Bee Populations
Tom Earls is a beekeeper and educator in Surf Coast, Victoria, and the founder of Coastal Nectar.Subscribe to the podcastSpecifically, we discuss: Why we need to protect bee populationsRole in the ecosystemPesticides and insecticidesMedicinal properties of honeyHow to help local bee populations thriveCoastal Nectar links:Coastal Nectar on Facebook Coastal Nectar on InstagramMind Body Plants links:Mind Body Plants on InstagramEducation and further resources:Bringing bees back to Australian backyardsSupporting native bee populationsEnsuring our food securityBees are dying. What can we do about it?Worldwide, bee populations are on the decline. This is caused by the use of pesticides and herbicides, climate change, loss of habitat, and agriculture services like monoculture farming, contributing to a loss in plant biodiversity. Without plant biodiversity for bees to pollinate or feed on, bees are hindered to provide their colony and subsequently, the ecosystem at large.  Why do we need to protect bee populations? Bees are keystone species, meaning they are an organism that helps hold the system together. Without keystone species, the ecosystem would be drastically different or cease entirely. If bees die off it will end most life. Throughout nature, animals depend on bees for their survival because their food sources, things like berries, fruits, seeds, and nuts, rely on insect pollination. Pollination is needed for the growth of flora, providing the habitat and nutrition for animals.
#6 - Tania De Jong AM: Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy
Jul 14 2020
#6 - Tania De Jong AM: Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy
Tania De Jong is an inspirational speaker, singer, business woman and social entrepreneur who has founded a number of successful businesses including Creative Universe, leading innovation conference Creative Innovation Global, Inspiring Minds leadership programs, MTA Entertainment and Events, Dimension5 co-working space and acclaimed singing group Pot-Pourri, started 3 charities in Creativity Australia, With One Voice, The Song Room and in relevance to today's episode Mind Medicine Australia. Tania performs, speaks and presents leadership workshops across the globe. As the title suggests, this episode is about the therapeutic potential for psychedelic medicines. I've wanted to talk about them for a long time now. I've been researching them for a number of years now and after finding Mind Medicine Australia, I thought it would be the perfect opportunity to do so. Before we get into this conversation, I want to provide you with a bit more of an understanding of what conventional psychedelics are doing on a physiological basis. In clinical research settings across the globe, investigations are taking place for the use of psychedelic substances, particularly psilocybin, for treating illnesses such as addiction, depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Since the termination of research from the 1970, most psychedelic substances were classified as "drugs of abuse". And unfortunately, due to the government propaganda from this time, psychedelics were considered unsafe for human consumption and of no therapeutic use. Central to the revival is reestablishing it's set and setting, set being mindset, psychological expectations and intentions for using these substances, and setting being the physical environment, as well as the therapeutic clinician-patient relationship. Set and setting are crucial elements for facilitating paradigm shifting mental patterns and recognizing positive outcomes. The general public is certainly well-versed on the potential harms, and the dangers are absolutely real, however much of this is from cases involving patients who used illicit substances in uncontrolled, undesirable, unsupervised non-medical contexts. Currently, 1 in 5 Australian adults have a chronic mental illness. That's 4.8 million of us. 1 in 8 are on antidepressants and over 45% of Australians will experience mental illness in their lifetime. There has been no improvement in treatment in mental illness for decades. 50 years, in fact. This screams for innovation. The FDA has now granted psychedelic medicines as "breakthrough therapy designation" to fast-track the approval process. This is not just a preposterous idea, but a potentially quantum leap forward for mental illness. Links: *@mindmedicine.au* *mindmedicineaustralia.org*
#5 - Allira Potter: Racial Disparities, Meditation and Truth
Jul 2 2020
#5 - Allira Potter: Racial Disparities, Meditation and Truth
Indigenous Healer Allira Potter and I "open the conversation". Note - this was recorded 1 week after the death of George Floyd - a huge week for the world and particularly for people of colour, so at times it was a difficult conversation, but one that needed to be had. Talking to your relatives, friends and immediate family can be challenging and scary when talking about racism and systemic racism. That even if no one was racist, people of colour are still at a disadvantage. When we're speaking to our folks, it's important to be mindful of how we go about the conversations. If we want to teach people about this, we need to act as teachers. This requires understanding, patience, vigilance. There are 2 types of people; those who are uninformed and those who are bigoted. Bigoted just means that they're unreasonably attached to a particular belief or belief system and are essentially intolerant to other people's beliefs. The discussion is never easy, but doable. We can't just wait around for the boomers to die out. We need them, and with the right strategy, respect, patience, we can teach them. Let's start with the uninformed folks, all you need to do is inform them BUT be careful with language and tone. Please don't say "Educate yourself" it's not the right way of doing it, instead say "here are some materials you can read and watch" and leave it at that. For those who are bigoted, this is a little more challenging. It comes down to a lack of empathy. You must understand the mindset. When someone isn't affected by a problem, they can have trouble understanding why anyone would care about it. They struggle imaging being hurt, or putting themselves in another perspective or another person's shoes. So we need to talk to them about these concepts in ways they can understand, and framing the ideas with language they resonate with. Instead of saying things like "white privilege" or "black lives matter" use phrases like "Your life has been hard, but the colour of your skin didn't make it harder" or "everyone's life must be protected, but right now black people are in danger and they need our help". It may be uncomfortable to let go of words you identify with often. Never tell them they're wrong, but say things like "that's what they mean when they use the word privilege" instead of "that's privilege". Conversations don't have to be 60 minute conversations like this, but it's just a matter of opening the conversation. Believe in people; that we can all grow and learn and adapt. Connect with Allira - *@allira.potter*
#4 - Fiona Tuck: Building A Healthy Gut
Jun 20 2020
#4 - Fiona Tuck: Building A Healthy Gut
Fiona Tuck is one of the most well-respected skincare and nutrition experts in Australia. She has over 25 years of experience in the professional skincare and wellness industry and is known in the media as 'the myth buster'. Fiona takes a forensic and often challenging approach into all things nutrition and skincare. ​ Fiona is an Author, Nutritional Medicine Practitioner, Skincare Expert, member of the British Dermatological Nursing Group and an accredited member of the Australian Traditional Medicine Society. Fiona's extensive experience in the professional skincare industry includes roles as International Training Manager for Dermalogica, Corporate Trainer for Aspect and Cosmedix Cosmeceuticals, Managing Director of Skinstitut and founder of Vita-sol nutraceuticals. Her experience ranges from nutrition client consulting, hands on skin treatments, industry educator to product innovation and development culminating in both brand and company development. ​ Fiona founded Vita-sol in 2017 with a mission to support skin, health and well-being with the highest quality natural wholefoods without the use of synthetic vitamin supplements, fillers, excipients or petrochemicals. ​ Fiona hosts a fortnightly podcast called "The Forensic Nutritionist" and her in-depth knowledge and insight into future trends within the wellness industry has made her a sought-after media commentator and one of Australia's most televised nutrition and skin experts. ​ An impressive resume. In this episode I really wanted to zone in on gut health. I've talked about the gut and the gut microbiota in other episodes but I wanted to get a full understanding of gut health from the ground up. Fiona and I talk about fiber, prebiotics, probiotics, postbiotics, what causes inflammation and intestinal permeability, FODMAPs, some skin conditions and their relationship to gut health, the importance of plant based diversity, hormone appetite, hunger regulation and so on. LINKS: *@fionatucknutrition* *www.fionatuck.com*