Redshirt Collective

Nic & Mike

Join Nic and Mike as we boldly go...through every single episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation! We post every other Thursday, covering one episode of TNG in each episode of the podcast, giving our takes as radical leftists and connecting themes in the show to our personal experiences. Looking to create a welcoming space for all those in the fandom that are usually kept at the margins; we want our comrades from around the world to laugh and rage along with us as we analyze a show that functioned as dangerous heteronormative neocolonial propaganda, but also as a heartwarming attempt to find humanity, tenderness and curiosity within ourselves. Welcome aboard, comrade!

S1E5 Where No One Has Gone Before: The One in Which Wesley Meets the Traveler
Apr 7 2022
S1E5 Where No One Has Gone Before: The One in Which Wesley Meets the Traveler
Star Trek: The Next Generation analysis of season 1 episode 5 (Where No One Has Gone Before) OMG Y'ALL WE DID IT! We made it to an episode that is good, actually. No racism, no antisemitism, no sexism; just a good ol' space adventure heavy on philosophy and queer vibes. This episode is Wesley Crusher-centric and you KNOW that makes us happy! In this episode we meet The Traveler, who won't come back until season 7 in terrible episode that we're dreading having to talk about, an alien from another realm who is able to use thought to shape reality. An intriguing concept that the show unfortunately doesn't spend much time on. We learn through him that Wesley is officially the most special boy in space, as he compares him to Mozart. The rest of the episode is an absolute sausage fest with Riker and guest Engineer Kosinski trying to out-mansplain each other and jocky for dominance, to our delight. In the background of their macho shenanigans, the soft exchanges between Wesley and The Traveler gives us queer vibes and an alternative to the usual patriarchal masculinity on display aboard The Enterprise. The subtext of their exchanges is that of an older queer who sees queerness in the younger person, and their conversations about Wesley needing to hide his "dangerous nonsense" have the tone of a mentorship centered on fear and protection through hiding. Wesley shows The Traveler care and kindness, doting on him like a mother hen, and feels a very strong connection to him, as if sensing something in him that he recognizes instinctually but does not yet realize about himself. It's all very sweet and we absolutely love it. We also discuss how much this episode parallels our experiences at our jobs with projects that don't make sense and arrogant middle-management walking around terrorizing everyone with their demands coded in corporate jargon and emails scheduled to send at 3 am. Where No One Has Gone Before also features a wonderful scene between Picard and his dead mother, acted to perfection by Patrick Stewart, and some genuinely hilarious moments as Kosinski baffles and irritates the crew. It's the first episode that feels like TNG and we look forward to more of these in the future. Support the Show!Financially support us on Patreon! You'll get access to rad merchandise and bonus content at ( us on Instagram to enjoy our juicy episode-related memes at ( us with others by leaving us a review on iTunes or your preferred podcasting app, sharing us on social media, and/or recommending us to friends!
S1E4 The Last Outpost: The One in Which Star Trek Does an Antisemitism
Mar 24 2022
S1E4 The Last Outpost: The One in Which Star Trek Does an Antisemitism
Star Trek: The Next Generation analysis of season 1 episode 4 (The Last Outpost) After some subtle but intriguing build-up over the last three episodes, we finally meet the Ferengi and they are...not great. Falling into the "Space Jew" trope, the Ferengi encapsulate a lot of issues discussed in the last episode: Orientalism, colonialism/anti-Indigeneity, white feminism, racism. Beyond being antisemetic, this episode is also insufferable philosophy bro navel-gazing, seemingly written by That Guy TM who thinks he's the first person to read The Art of War. It's not all bad though: this episode was an absolute convoluted mess that gave us incredible moments like Geordi's "woowee!" and Data's "nothing to write home about." We get a lot of mileage out of the "power converter" that the Ferengi purportedly stole, unable to say it without channeling Luke Skywalker's legendary whininess and devolving into giggles. We talk about how human Data is in this episode as writers still (and basically will always) continue to struggle to write him as an actual android; how actor LeVar Burton kicks the energy level up to ten while Jonathan Frakes gives him back a one; how Deanna Troi is the only reasonable, logical person in this episode; how, as always, the security team are written as trigger happy dolts for Picard to yell at; and how the Chinese fingertraps go absolutely nowhere. Support the Show!Financially support us on Patreon! You'll get access to rad merchandise and bonus content at ( us on Instagram to enjoy our juicy episode-related memes at ( us with others by leaving us a review on iTunes or your preferred podcasting app, sharing us on social media, and/or recommending us to friends!
S1E3 Code of Honor: The One in Which Star Trek Does a Racism
Mar 10 2022
S1E3 Code of Honor: The One in Which Star Trek Does a Racism
Star Trek: The Next Generation analysis of season 1 episode 3 (Code of Honor) The focus of today's show is (arguably) the most notorious Star Trek episode of any series, an episode so overtly racist that the director of it was fired DURING production. In the '80s. Mike and Nic do their whitest best to analyze the harmful themes presented within while tying specific scenes, dialogue, wardrobe choices in the episode to their white supremacist colonialist roots via conversations about anthropology, museums, Orientalism, and more. We also note the white-feminism-via-the-male-gaze undercurrent running throughout the episode. While Tasha Yar is (yet again) objectified, she also objectifies; her role is instrumental to the racist narrative. She is white woman kidnapped, and also 'girl boss' warrior who can fight her own fights. She is victim and victor and prize. Nic includes a bunch of trivia about this particular episode in this one, including what cast members and fans think of it. Her favorite resources linked below (read the comments!): References (Is “Code of Honor” the Worst “Star Trek: The Next Generation” Episode?) (The Take) (Star Trek: The Next Generation: Code of Honor director fired during filming) (Redshirts Always Die) (Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch: “Code of Honor”) (The Viewscreen) (Star Trek: The Next Generation "Code of Honor") Trivia (IMDB) Support the Show!Financially support us on Patreon! You'll get access to rad merchandise and bonus content at ( us on Instagram to enjoy our juicy episode-related memes at ( us with others by leaving us a review on iTunes or your preferred podcasting app, sharing us on social media, and/or recommending us to friends!
S1E2 The Naked Now: The One in Which The Crew is H*RNY
Feb 24 2022
S1E2 The Naked Now: The One in Which The Crew is H*RNY
Star Trek: The Next Generation analysis of season 1 episode 2 (The Naked Now) Inexplicably, the second-ever episode of TNG finds the crew drunk off dying dwarf star juice and lookin' to bone DOWN. In an episode that is mostly nonsense, we find many things to laugh about and a few to analyze. The first thing we noticed was that this episode hits different in COVID-times. Between the severe lack of hygiene protocols and the uncontested application of the vaccine, it is really hard not to draw parallels to our post-2020 reality! Though most of the lusty shenanigans in this episode have little bearing on the series as a whole or the characters within it, one event DOES bear scrutiny and that is the hookup between Data and Tasha Yar. We talk in-depth about how that scene was handled, in terms of Tasha's status as a victim/survivor, as well as Data's autistic coding. This pairing could've been a really beautiful moment but unfortunately fell into a few problematic tropes - specifically sexualizing a survivor from the male gaze, and supporting the idea that sleeping with autistic/disabled people is embarrassing. Our sweet baby boy Wesley officially saves the day for the first time, Data imparts some words of wisdom, Bev develops a vaccine, and everyone's sweaty upper lips dry in relief. Support the Show!Financially support us on Patreon! You'll get access to rad merchandise and bonus content at ( us on Instagram to enjoy our juicy episode-related memes at ( us with others by leaving us a review on iTunes or your preferred podcasting app, sharing us on social media, and/or recommending us to friends!