Get Emergent: Leadership Development, Improved Communication, and Enhanced Team Performance

Emergent: Coaching businesses and individuals through complex professional and organizational transformations

Transformation is hard. Get Emergent makes it a little easier. Presented by Emergent, this bi-weekly conversation explores the latest techniques and proven best practices to guide businesses and individuals through complex professional and organizational transformations. Creative leadership development strategies, improved communication techniques, enhanced team performance – on Get Emergent, we’re talking about it and providing critical insights that can help you achieve your goals. Subscribe now and learn more about us at getemergent.com.

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Confidence
Nov 17 2022
Confidence
Confidence is critical to effective leadership. If you sometimes feel less than self-assured, there’s a five-step process that can strengthen your confidence and enhance your leadership. In this episode, Ralph and Bill break down the technique. Listen and give it a try. Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases it is incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors Bill Berthel: Welcome to the GetEmergent podcast, where we discuss various leadership topics, team and organizational development ideas, and current leadership challenges and successes. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: Ralph, today we’re gonna talk about this topic of confidence. I’ve been thinking about it. I’ve been reading Jordan Peterson’s 12 Rules for Life, and I think it’s rule number one, stand up, stand tall, he calls it. So this idea of confidence. Ralph Simone: Leaders need it, right? There’s a leadership presence. For anyone who intends to be influential, right? There’s a physiology that influences the psychology. But if we don’t believe, we’re not confident in our idea ourselves, how are we going to influence others to believe and support in it as well? So I think this is really an important aspect for leaders to have. And you don’t want it to be hubris, right? You want it to be confidence without arrogance. But we find a lot of leaders lack that confidence, don’t we? Bill Berthel: I think it’s why we start our Emergent Leader program with, you use the term leadership presence and it’s not hubris. It’s about finding your authentic values and purpose. So you can always anchor back to that. So that’s the spirit or the energy that is informing your decision-making, your activities, and your behavior. Ralph Simone: So I love the word you used, anchor. Cause one of the things that we’re gonna demonstrate later in the session is a leadership practice called a circle of excellence, which takes people through a process of anchoring back to a time when they were very confident in applying that forward to a situation where that confidence is going to be needed. Bill Berthel: It’s so important. I mean, even those of us that have, you know, a decent level of confidence and self-esteem, we may have had an experience that didn’t go quite as we hoped or quite as expected. We’re in the public speaking space all the time, and I, I gotta tell you, I actually, I get pretty nervous. Almost every presentation I’m going to make, and I’ve got a pretty big one coming up. You know, it, it shakes me a little bit. I’ll be really honest, you know, I’m a little nervous. Ralph Simone: Well, that’s understandable, but I think one of the things we have to be careful of before we actually go into shifting this energy is that that energy is okay. We’ve worked with a lot of high-powered leaders.
Confidence
Nov 17 2022
Confidence
Confidence is critical to effective leadership. If you sometimes feel less than self-assured, there’s a five-step process that can strengthen your confidence and enhance your leadership. In this episode, Ralph and Bill break down the technique. Listen and give it a try. Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases it is incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors Bill Berthel: Welcome to the GetEmergent podcast, where we discuss various leadership topics, team and organizational development ideas, and current leadership challenges and successes. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: Ralph, today we’re gonna talk about this topic of confidence. I’ve been thinking about it. I’ve been reading Jordan Peterson’s 12 Rules for Life, and I think it’s rule number one, stand up, stand tall, he calls it. So this idea of confidence. Ralph Simone: Leaders need it, right? There’s a leadership presence. For anyone who intends to be influential, right? There’s a physiology that influences the psychology. But if we don’t believe, we’re not confident in our idea ourselves, how are we going to influence others to believe and support in it as well? So I think this is really an important aspect for leaders to have. And you don’t want it to be hubris, right? You want it to be confidence without arrogance. But we find a lot of leaders lack that confidence, don’t we? Bill Berthel: I think it’s why we start our Emergent Leader program with, you use the term leadership presence and it’s not hubris. It’s about finding your authentic values and purpose. So you can always anchor back to that. So that’s the spirit or the energy that is informing your decision-making, your activities, and your behavior. Ralph Simone: So I love the word you used, anchor. Cause one of the things that we’re gonna demonstrate later in the session is a leadership practice called a circle of excellence, which takes people through a process of anchoring back to a time when they were very confident in applying that forward to a situation where that confidence is going to be needed. Bill Berthel: It’s so important. I mean, even those of us that have, you know, a decent level of confidence and self-esteem, we may have had an experience that didn’t go quite as we hoped or quite as expected. We’re in the public speaking space all the time, and I, I gotta tell you, I actually, I get pretty nervous. Almost every presentation I’m going to make, and I’ve got a pretty big one coming up. You know, it, it shakes me a little bit. I’ll be really honest, you know, I’m a little nervous. Ralph Simone: Well, that’s understandable, but I think one of the things we have to be careful of before we actually go into shifting this energy is that that energy is okay. We’ve worked with a lot of high-powered leaders.
Effective Resource Utilization
Nov 3 2022
Effective Resource Utilization
Too many organizations suffer from ineffective resource allocation. The problem may stem from various factors like inadequate delegation, employee burnout, or unclear direction, vision and goals. And the solution may lie in experimentation, for example reducing – yes, reducing – work hours, and studying what others who allocate resources well are doing and emulating them. Listen in for ideas you can bring to your organization. Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases it is incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast, where we discuss various leadership topics, team and organizational development ideas, and current leadership challenges and successes. I’m Bill Bertell. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: Ralph, we’ve got a great topic today. We wanna talk about effective resource allocation. What does that even mean to be effective in allocating our resources and our teams and our organizations? Ralph Simone: Well, I wanna start with what I recognize is an ungrounded assessment. I believe that many people in most organizations are underutilized, that we are not allocating our resources in the most effective or optimal way. And, and by the way, I wanna be clear, I don’t mean that people are working a hundred percent of the time because first of all, I don’t think that’s sustainable and it’s probably not, you know, really, uh, good for their performance over time. Bill Berthel: Well, I’m glad you said that because I think most of us feel busy. I know we like to overuse that word of being busy. We’ve talked in previous podcasts about that idea of being whelmed or overwhelmed. So what do you mean by utilized? Ralph Simone: Well, I think it’s being able to get the job done that’s assigned, but also to be thinking about how to do the job differently. Also, to be thinking about what doesn’t need to get done. So I think when we think about effective utilization of people, there’s gotta be space for doing, thinking, being, experimenting, and you know, I mean, you brought up the word busy. You know, we don’t like people to use that word because I think the, you know, work is the path of least resistance. But we don’t wanna just be doing the work. We wanna be thinking about the work. I mean, this is how companies get into these big cost overruns or margin erosion or too much overhead. They just kind of add, add, add, keep their headcount. And we’re really not looking at creative ways in which we could utilize the resources that are currently, uh, in our employment. Bill Berthel: So we’ve got an opportunity to think about how we utilize our people, their talents, their contributions differently in our organizations. Ralph Simone: Absolutely. I, I think one of the things that we, why we don’t utilize or allocate effectively is that we have many underdeveloped people. Mm. And you know, I, I think there are a lot of go-to people that are overutilized. You know, we rely on them, you know, too much. And so we have to kinda look at, well, why aren’t we utilizing these people for this? An
Accountability as an Empowering Principle
Oct 20 2022
Accountability as an Empowering Principle
90% of employees would say that effectively holding others accountable is one of the top priorities of leadership. But how can you do that without “weaponizing” accountability? Bill and Ralph offer some tips and exercises to improve accountability in your business and strengthen your leadership. Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast where we discuss contemporary topics of leadership team and organizational effectiveness. I’m Bill Bertell Ralph Simone: and I’m Ralph Simone. And today we’re gonna talk about a topic that often locks people up and the topic is accountability, and it is a topic that we have dealt with in previous podcasts, but we wanna deal with it a little differently. It’s broader much broader than people’s initial reaction to it. You know, Bill, how can we help people with this concept that they often get locked up around? Bill Berthel: You know, I think there’s some good reasons we get locked up around accountability. I think not gonna throw any stones. I’m probably guilty of the same in, in my leadership path, but, you know, do we use accountability as a tool or a weapon? Are we weaponizing accountability? And what I mean by that is the scorekeeping. Holding people back or making them feel like they’re getting caught, doing something wrong instead of that place of what we often call co-accountability and getting proactive and partnering on the response-ability. Ralph Simone: nice. Well, I think that it goes beyond jamming people up for not delivering on a commitment. And I exactly, I, I like when we in coaching, one of the last steps in coaching is accountability and support, you know, asking people to make a commitment at the end of a meeting and also inquiring as to how can I support you in achieving that commitment. Bill Berthel: I love that. I love the idea. of you know, supporting and then accountability model, you know, so the data shows that 82% of managers acknowledge that they have limited to no ability to hold others accountable successfully. So if, if managers and leaders are feeling at that level, there’s a challenge, right? Because 91% of employees would say that effectively holding others accountable is one of their company’s top leadership needs. And so there’s this fear around accountability, I think perhaps, especially in today’s organizations, where we wanna make sure that we’re encouraging individuals to bring their talents, bring their abilities forward. We’re almost gun shy of accountability. Ralph Simone: Well, you know, and don’t you think we’re gun shy because we don’t set it up well, in the beginning? I almost think a challenge with accountability is sloppy language. You know, that we’re not clear, what are we actually being held accountable to? And, and I think, uh, I’ve often said this and I believe it to be true is that if our commitments are clear and understood. That accountability is almost self-evidence. Bill Berthel: So we gotta make those clear requests and make sure that we’re making good promises. Right. Make sure we’re making clear requests. So it’s understood what we’re being accountable to and to make sure that we’re saying yes to those things, we can truly say yes to, you know, I, I dabbled it a little life coaching for a little while.
People don’t want to work anymore, right? Wrong!
Oct 6 2022
People don’t want to work anymore, right? Wrong!
Having problems recruiting and retaining employees? Change your thinking. There is not a shortage of good job candidates and people do want to work. Bill and Ralph discuss the benefits of shifting your perspective and being open to redesigning “work” to attract quality talent and keep them engaged. Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast where we discuss contemporary topics of leadership teams and organizational effectiveness. I’m Bill Bertell and I’m Ralph Simone: Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: Hey Ralph. So today we want to talk a little bit about, what we’re hearing from a lot of leaders. A lot of our clients, this difficulty in finding people that either want to work or there aren’t people out there. Ralph Simone: Well, you know, it’s interesting when I had lot energy. Now let’s at least say. As a record number of people have quit their jobs. Many sectors of the economy are struggling to fill vacancies. That is true. Yes, but we feel that the reason they’re having trouble is because they’re not changing the way they’re looking to fill those positions and they are not changing the positions that they are filling. Bill Berthel: So you’re suggesting that there is a way to find these people, that there are people out there that wanna work. We just need. Switch it up a little bit. Ralph Simone: Absolutely. I mean, I think it’s, you know, when we change the way we look at things, the things we look at change. Yeah. And I think the first we’ve gotta stop talking ourselves out of the fact, you know, that nobody wants to work. They may wanna work differently and the way in which we find them and not just find them retain them will require us as leaders. To think and act differently. I think this is an opportunity to think again, because this projection becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, and then we convince ourselves that we can’t get it done. Bill Berthel: I love that. You know, it, it reminds me so, uh, past career, as an HR director, I had recruitment reporting to me. And you know, this was the time when newspaper ads and ads in the classifieds weren’t catching people’s attention anymore. They were all of a sudden this new thing called social media. Right? And we, and we wanted to resist going to that new space cause we didn’t know much about it. And so we’d throw classified ads out in the paper and gosh, less and less people were answering those ads. We had to change it up. We had to do something different Ralph Simone: and we have done that. Organizations over time have made the shift. This is just another time to make another shift. And, you know, we both kind of enjoyed, one of the recent Harvard business review articles, which talks about designing work that people love. And it’s time to design and redesign the work that people love so that we can attract and retain people. I, I. I have two clients that are hardware space and logistic space. Okay. They have no trouble filling spots. Mm-hmm and it was interesting to me. I said, where do you get your, some of your best people, you know, waiters and bartenders. And, and, and I say, so what do you do? They go, we, we go out to eat a lot. We go down, we go out to drink a fair amount. And when we are engaged by somebody who shows a lot of energy, And
The Dilemma of the Working Manager
Sep 15 2022
The Dilemma of the Working Manager
Balancing “Working On” and “Working In” the Business. Effective working managers are adept at managing polarities – strategy vs. tactics, planning vs. executing, delegating vs. doing. Ralph and Bill discuss the challenges that many working managers face, and offer tips and exercises to help you achieve balance and scale your leadership and your business. Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast where we discussed contemporary topics of leadership teams and organizational effectiveness. I’m Bill Berthel Ralph Simone: and I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: Ralph, we’ve got a great topic. I think this is going to appeal to every listener today. The dilemma of the working manager balancing, working on and working in the business. What does that even mean? Working on. And in the business? Ralph Simone: Great question. You know, a lot of our people’s work involves getting people to think strategically relationship management, communicating direction. Those are the things that are more aligned with working on the business. You know, if we, if we put it into, Stephen Covey speak in the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, those would be the not urgent but important activities. If we’re gonna really scale our business and stay ahead of the curve, we have to invest time and energy on working on the business activities versus working in the business, which are the day to day tactical actions that were required to do to, uh, make products or create reports or write books, right. That’s the day to day stuff. So that’s the distinction. Bill Berthel: And so few working leaders or managers today are able to just work in one of those areas. Ralph Simone: Yeah. And I, I don’t even know if that’s the desired state. Right? But, but what we do find is when we’re working. Leaders as coaches, they struggle with finding time and energy to work on the business. And I think one of the problem I’ll use that word is this is not a problem to be solved. Right. This is what we were refer to as a polarity to be managed. So when you think about strategic and tactical work, those are two interdependent values. It’s not one or the other for the long term success of an enterprise. And so as we look at that relationship, we wanna optimize spending enough energy and time in strategic activities working on with optimizing spending