Get Emergent: Leadership Development, Improved Communication, and Enhanced Team Performance

Emergent: Coaching businesses and individuals through complex professional and organizational transformations

Transformation is hard. Get Emergent makes it a little easier. Presented by Emergent, this bi-weekly conversation explores the latest techniques and proven best practices to guide businesses and individuals through complex professional and organizational transformations. Creative leadership development strategies, improved communication techniques, enhanced team performance – on Get Emergent, we’re talking about it and providing critical insights that can help you achieve your goals. Subscribe now and learn more about us at getemergent.com. read less
BusinessBusiness

Episodes

Leading Up
5d ago
Leading Up
Even leaders have leaders. And sometimes it’s challenging for leaders to express concerns and offer feedback to those at a higher level of leadership. The solution lies in learning to lean into the inevitable discomfort of sharing your perspective with whomever needs to hear it, regardless of their position, and in creating conditions throughout the organization that allow others to feel safe in doing the same. Listen as Ralph and Bill discuss and make suggestions to help you “lead up” effectively.     Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors     Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast. This is the space where we discuss leadership and team organizational topics and better practices. We like to provide concepts and ideas that you can turn into pragmatic experiments to help you develop your higher potential in your work and in your leadership. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: Ralph today’s topic of leading up means a lot to me. You know, I’ve, in my past, and maybe still do to some extent, I hold back a little bit. You know, I’ve kind of bitten my tongue on a good idea or I won’t speak up. And it’s usually out of concern or even as strong as a fear. I’m afraid of the other person’s reaction, whether it’s my boss, whether that’s my partner, whether it’s my colleague. Right. I’m holding back. Ralph Simone: I think it’s normal. I think we all do it to a certain extent, and I think part of it could be fear based. Part of it’s the power dynamic. Bill Berthel: Yes. Ralph Simone: In the context of the work we do with organizations, I think leading up can be a scary proposition because we don’t know how it’s going to land with our boss or we don’t know if it will be well received. But it’s a vital practice because what we know with our work with emotional intelligence, the higher up in an organization you go, the least amount of meaningful feedback you get. So how are you going to make good business decisions and choices if you don’t have all the information? So I think this is a vital practice to make people less uncomfortable. I’m not going to say make them comfortable. And I think part of leading up is leaning in the discomfort of sharing your perspective with whomever needs to hear it. Bill Berthel: Yeah, I like reframing it, maybe away from comfort, more towards more practiced. I might not get comfortable with it in the end, but more practice will provide more familiarity with this. And can you unpack just for a second for me, this idea that the higher up in an organization you go, you may be getting less meaningful feedback? Is that what you said? Ralph Simone: Yeah, I think people hedge their bets. I think they’re reluctant, and this could be because of baggage they bring from other organizations, but I think they’re reluctant to let the emperor know that he or she has no clothes on. And it could be that the organization doesn’t have enough psychological safety. Bill Berthel: Sure. Ralph Simone: Yeah. My kids challenged me on this because they said, dad, you seem to remember all these stories when you spoke up a lot. How about the times you didn’t. Obviously, those aren’t the stories I’m telling. I know there were plenty of times that I have bitten my tongue and that sa
Old School Credibility
May 2 2024
Old School Credibility
You’ve probably heard the saying “I wouldn’t ask anyone to do anything I wouldn’t do myself.” Perhaps you’ve said it yourself. But is it actually a sustainable leadership philosophy? After all, as leaders, we can’t possibly do everything ourselves. In fact, that’s precisely why we have teams. And it’s not practical to think leaders on their own can keep pace with the exponential changes shaping every industry today. If this hits home for you, this episode is a must-listen.     Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors     Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast. This is the space where we discuss leadership team and organizational topics and better practices. We like to provide concepts and ideas that you can turn into pragmatic experiments to help you develop your higher potential in all of your work and your leadership. I’m Bill Berthel Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone Bill Berthel: Ralph, I’m excited to talk about this idea of old school credibility. You know, we hear the declaration, I wouldn’t ask anyone to do something I wouldn’t do from leaders. Ralph Simone: Really I would. I built a whole career on doing that. Bill Berthel: Well, you’re maybe more a progressive guy than some people we work with, but I agree with this topic when it comes to ethics and morals. Right. I would not ask anyone to do something I wouldn’t be willing to do from an ethical and a moral perspective. But I don’t think that’s what folks are saying. They’re really talking about this idea that, you know, if I’m not a subject matter expert in this space, I’m not going to have credibility to lead others. And I’m really excited to introduce Geoff Storm. Geoff is with us today. Geoff is with us every recording. Ralph Simone: Yes. Bill Berthel: But today we asked him to join us in this conversation because as we were preparing, he had some beautiful examples of this in his career. Geoff welcome. Geoff Storm: Thank you very much. It’s a pleasure to be here. on the mic this time, I guess. Bill Berthel: Yeah, yeah. Ralph Simone: So we already has the better voice. Bill Berthel: Well, Geoff does have a voice for radio, but he’s got a handsome face too. So he’s not one of those guys with just a face for radio. But Geoff is our support from MPW and he is our recording technician. And Geoff it’s awesome to have you here every time, but to hear your voice today and your examples of where this has shown up in your career. Could you share with us a little bit what you were sharing with Ralph and I earlier about how you felt in your leadership role? Geoff Storm: I said, as soon as you started to sort of lay out what your plan was for today and where you were going to go with this podcast, I just kind of chimed in and said, this one really hits home for me because as you alluded to, my background is actually in this sort of thing, recording video, audio, that kind of thing. And then I went, twelve years ago now, I came to work for MPW, which is a full service advertising agency. So I mean, there are many people in that organization who do things that I cannot do, that I still, after twelve years, cannot do. They have skill sets and knowledge bases that are beyond the scope of mine. And suddenly I was in a leadership role with these people on
You’re Not Paranoid, There are Patterns
Apr 18 2024
You’re Not Paranoid, There are Patterns
There really are patterns in life. Effective leaders can recognize those patterns and use them to optimize the performance of their teams. Listen as Bill and Ralph give examples of patterns you can exploit to enhance your leadership – and how to do it.     Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors     Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast. This is the space where we discuss leadership team and organizational topics and better practices. We like to provide concepts and ideas that you can turn into pragmatic experiments to help you develop your higher potential in your work and your leadership. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. And Bill, I’m fascinated with this topic today because I have no idea what it means. Bill Berthel: Ah, you do. You do. Bill Berthel: Once we get into the conversation, you’re gonna. So the title of you’re not paranoid, there are patterns, right? It’s really about looking for and looking at the patterns. The reference to paranoia, right? Paranoia is defined as an ability or a sensing of patterns and sequences. Typically, the paranoid think those patterns are out to get them, right. It’s a negative thing, but we’re going to flip that. There really are patterns in our life, in the world. The way things are structured and really effective. Leaders can read those patterns and utilize them in their leadership to optimize the results of their teams and their organizations. That’s what we’re talking about today. Bill Berthel: I love it. Ralph Simone: I’d actually like rather look at that paranoia as an intuition, so much. Bill Berthel: Is that right? It’s this beautiful ability to tap into that, right? We can take cues from the patterns and the models that are around us when we start to see that, whatever you believe in, intelligent design, divine creation, nature’s blueprint, right? These are all possible sources. Wherever these patterns come from, they’re abundantly around us. They’re very real. They’re very real. What kind of patterns would leaders be looking for or uncovering in their organizations Ralph Simone: Preston, I’m curious, what kind of patterns would leaders be looking for or should they be looking for or uncovering in their organizations? Bill Berthel: I can think of three specific to leadership and really talk about those kind of meta, patterns or models, if you will. But we’ll give some specific examples. But just think about the simplicity of most people on this planet live somewhere where there’s a change of seasons, right? We experience that pattern, right? Especially here in the northeast of the United States. We have four pretty distinct seasons. I guess our winters are getting more mild and our summers might be getting hotter and drier, but still pretty distinct seasons. Summer always follows spring, winter always follows autumn. While not completely forecastable, we can understand whether patterns each season will bring. So a really simple model of patterns most of us could relate to. We can look at just about any leadership model that’s been published for patterns. So the Harvard business School is notorious for their two by two models, right? Almost every theory Harvard provides follows, that specific pattern right. Plotted on a quadrant and x y axes gives us four different dynamics to think a
Redefining AI
Apr 4 2024
Redefining AI
In the context of today’s episode, AI means more than artificial intelligence. It means Applied Impact. Listen as Ralph and Bill demystify artificial intelligence and discuss ways to harness technology to drive productivity and make a positive impact on your leadership and within your organization.     Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors     Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast. This is the space where we discuss leadership team and organizational topics and better practices. We like to provide concepts and ideas that you can turn into pragmatic experiments to help you develop your higher potential in your work and in your leadership. I’m Bill Berthell. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: So, Ralph, we’re going to talk about AI today. That’s a pretty hot topic. Ralph Simone: Yes, it is. And, you know, I was a front-runner on AI. I have to tell you this. You, in m my old consulting days, I remember this is 1520, maybe 30 years ago, I was talking to my wife about AI, and she goes, what’s that stand for? I said, artificial intelligence. She goes, well, you ought to be pretty good at it because you got what I would describe as artificial intelligence and spades, my friend. So I was always interested in it. Bill Berthel: But today, we are going to talk. Ralph Simone: A little bit about artificial intelligence, but I’m looking at it from a little bit different angle, and this may help demystify AI, but applied impact. So when we think about AI and coaching, our, work with leaders, we’re thinking about the applied impact. I think the same thing holds true with artificial intelligence. I think are so nervous, and some of that nervous, probably rightfully so, because there’s a trend that over the next, right? In seven or eight years, millions of jobs will be changing or potentially eliminated. Bill Berthel: Right, right. Ralph Simone: But I think that there will be other jobs that will be created, and there will be other opportunities, and I think there will be other opportunities to really get the applied impact out of all this AI buzz. That’s what I’m kind of excited about. Bill Berthel: Yeah, absolutely. I mean, there are centuries of changes in technology, right. Something usually, you know, is the predecessor to the technology we have now. And there’s often some legitimate resistance to that change. Right. There might be some fear of the way in which I do something is going to go away, or I think in this case, it’s really close to the human element possibly being compromised or taken away from some work. Ralph Simone: Trey, it was interesting. I hadn’t thought about this, but as you know, and I’m very excited about this year, hopefully have a book coming out slow down to go faster. Yeah, yeah. And the applied impact of utilizing AI in the process. And this is a story that I know you’ve heard before, but I’m probably a better speaker than writer. I, tend to be clearer, perhaps tighter in my spoken word than in my written word. And I remember I’ve been working on this book for a number of years, and a breakthrough came from my son coaching me. He saw me grinding out. I would dedicate 90 minutes, four days a week to work on this because I read somewhere that, you know, if you’re going to write a book, you have to spend time writing every day. And he was lookin
Focus
Mar 21 2024
Focus
Today’s advice: limit the essential elements of your leadership to a vital few. Listen as Ralph and Bill discuss the critical importance of focus, and learn how you can sharpen your focus to optimize your leadership, and ultimately energize your team or organization.     Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors     Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast. This is the space where we discuss leadership, team and organizational topics and better practices. We like to provide concepts and ideas that you can turn into pragmatic experiments to help you develop your higher potential in your work and your leadership. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: So, Ralph, we’re talking about the topic of focus. Ralph Simone: I love this topic. Bill Berthel: You do? Bill Berthel Simone: Oh, yeah. This is what I call one of my natural gifts, one of my unique strengths, the ability to focus. Bill Berthel: Well, I’m ready to learn a lot from you because I see it as a, pretty significant gap for myself. So I’m excited about this one. Ralph Simone: I think the gap exists for all of us, including me. But I want to start with a story because I think this story, coming from a client experience, puts this in perspective. The challenge that we have. I was doing a meeting between a manager and a leader who we are coaching. And they had three goals for the coaching process. One was to improve their ability to hold others accountable. Bill Berthel: Okay. Ralph Simone: The second was to get their arms around the 10,000 things that they have to do. Now, I’m sure it was hyperbolic. However, I very quickly pointed out if they saw the relationship between the inability to hold people accountable and, the 10,000 things they have to do. Bill Berthel: Oh, interesting. Probably a correlation between accountability and the number of things we have to do and the capacity we have to do them in. Ralph Simone: Yeah. So which things do I focus on? What do I follow up on? What is okay to let go of? And I think organizations are constantly, they have so many things, and this is where focus comes in. And I play around with this. I love to play around with variations of. I think this is a variation of either an Emerson or a Thoreau quote. But focus, focus, focus. Make the essential elements of your life and your leadership number a vital few. We think we have this infinite capacity that we can do more. The more automated things become, the more things we think we can do. And I think it’s causing us to lose that discipline of really focusing on those essential items. Bill Berthel: Yeah, I think you’re right. I think we’re well intended. Right. We have a lot of interest. We want to get a lot of things done. We see a lot of opportunities. But even with that good intention, we’re overwhelming the capacity of our resources. And so focus is a way to get it back to what you call it, the vital few. Ralph Simone: The vital few. I like to get Paredo in the mix. Bill Berthel: Right. Ralph Simone: Wilfredo Paredo, the Italian economist who studied the unequal distribution of wealth, 20% of our tasks yield 80% of our results, 20% of our customers. And we seem to intellectually know that. I hear people talking about it all the time, and yet we’re trying to do everything. And I remember some of my Covey training. He said, if we see everything as important, we try to do everything. And what do we get? We get overwhelmed. B
Mapping What Matters Most
Mar 7 2024
Mapping What Matters Most
We often make critical decisions and changes before doing the introspective work necessary to identify what really matters most to us. Being more intentional about identifying what’s most important to us in our lives and careers is the first step in creating a roadmap to get there. Listen and learn more.     Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors     Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast where we discuss leadership Team and organizational topics and better practices. We like to provide concepts and ideas that you can turn into pragmatic experiments to help you develop your higher potential in your work and leadership. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Rolf Simone. Bill Berthel: Rolf, this topic today I’m really intrigued to learn more mapping what matters most. As our title, what does that entail? What does that mean? Mapping what matters most? Ralph Simone: Well, first of all, it implies that we’ve done the introspective work to identify what really matters most to us in our careers, in our lives. And then we create the map, or the plan, or the roadmap, if you will, to get there. And I think too often people are in action, they’re on the road before they even know where they want to go. Ralph Simone: Right? Ralph Simone: it happens at different ages and stages, but this idea of being more intentional, not only about what you want to do, but who you want to do it with. And I think sometimes people would benefit before they even make a career choice to think about the type of lifestyle they want to have. Bill Berthel: Interesting. Ralph Simone: What matters most then begins to drive the plans and the activities and the actions along the way. Bill Berthel: So, this really starts with identifying what matters most before we go in action with a plan or a map. The map is a plan in a way, but first it’s really identifying what matters most. Ralph Simone: Begin with the end in mind, where do you intend to end up? And then begin to create the plan to get there. We talk in a lot of other podcasts about why. Ralph Simone: So why precedes what and how and why I want to do this. Is it something that really lights me up? Is it my calling? Is it my purpose? And so, we spend a fair amount of time in mapping what matters most. Identifying what matters most through having people reflect on their purpose, activities and things that provide meaning to them. The m things that they value. We’ve talked about in other podcasts, you value what you do, you do what you value. But really giving some thought to what are those five to seven self-chosen, self-selected values that you will use to guide your behavior along the way? Some intentions. What are your intentions for what matters most? And then ultimately creating some weekly plans to get there. Ah, I think it starts with a couple of key questions. I like to ask people to identify essential relationships and activities. So sometimes people get a little hung up on what their purpose is. We can certainly take people through the creation of a mission statement and values, but just simply sitting back and identifying essential relationships and activities that Manor most. Because those things will inform what’s most important to you. Bill Berthel: I love this. I was just, coaching a young engineer the other day. And this is where he was starting. He was talkin
Judging Judgment
Feb 15 2024
Judging Judgment
There’s an old saying: we judge others by their actions, we judge ourselves by our intentions. For example, we might assume an employee who’s late for work is lazy or unreliable, without considering that there might be a valid, unavoidable reason for their tardiness. Such “attribution errors” are among the most common causes of conflict on teams. Listen and learn to identify and avoid unfair judgments.     Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors     Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast, where we discuss leadership team and organizational topics and better practices. We like to provide concepts and ideas that you can turn into pragmatic experiments to help you develop your higher potential in your work and in your leadership. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. And I’m almost coming out of my chair over the title of today’s podcast because I’m judging why you have me on as a guest. Bill Berthel: Stop. Ralph Simone: So, the title. You got to tell people the title. Bill, what’s the title of today’s podcast? Bill Berthel: Well, Judging  Judgment. Ralph Simone: Oh, beautiful. Beautiful. So, it’s my wheelhouse. Making judgments, Right. Wrong. Good. Bad. Ralph Simone: Let’s go. What are we even talking about here? Bill Berthel: I knew you’d be able to contribute  to today’s conversation Ralph Simone: Maybe more so than you would like. Bill Berthel: Never. Bill Berthel: Never. No. In social psychology, it’s known as the fundamental attribution error Bill Berthel: Come on. Really want to talk about this concept that. Honestly, Ralph, I think we’re all attuned to. unless you’re a saint, I think we’re all doing this. In social psychology, it’s known as the fundamental attribution error. Let me give you an example. Instead of the fancy title. Ralph Simone: That sounds fancy, though, I kind of like that. Bill Berthel: It’s rooted in our bias. It’s an attribution effect. Bill Berthel: Right. Bill Berthel: Examples help me. Bill Berthel: Right. Bill Berthel: An example of this fundamental attribution error would be, attributing a coworker’s lateness. They’re tardy for work. To the fact that they’re unreliable rather than they got stuck in traffic. Ralph Simone: Unreliable. Flaky. Bill Berthel: Yeah, whatever, right. Ralph Simone: I get this. Right. Okay. Bill Berthel: The adjectives are coming out. Bill Berthel: Right? Bill Berthel: So, in turn, one, would give themselves grace if they were late. Bill Berthel: Right. Bill Berthel: Because we’d know what happened, perhaps. Bill Berthel: Right. Bill Berthel: What’s the old saying? We judge others by their actions. We judge ourselves by our intentions. That’s really the heart of this attribution error space. Ralph Simone: So the attribution error becomes an ungrounded assessment. We’re actually drawing a conclusion without all of the information. Bill Berthel: Absolutely. And particularly in the social psychology place, which this is really important for leaders to think about because we are leading people. It’s typically a judgment about that person’s character or personality is where we make the attribution error. Bill Berthel: Right. Bill Berthel: So the example of that person was late. They’re unreliable. All of a sudden, we&
The Power of Not Knowing
Feb 1 2024
The Power of Not Knowing
In this episode, Bill speaks with Newell Eaton, a seasoned leadership coach and creative facilitator and frequent Emergent collaborator. As leaders, we can’t possibly know everything or have a solution to every problem. Consequently, there may be a temptation to pretend we have knowledge we actually don’t. But pretending can compromise trust. Listen as Newell discusses the importance of recognizing and admitting the things we don’t know, and learning to count on others for their expertise.     Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors     Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast. This is where we discuss leadership team and organizational topics and better practices. We like to provide concepts and ideas that you can turn into pragmatic experiments to help you develop your higher potential in your work and your leadership. I’m Bill Berthel and today I have a very special guest with me. He’s a longtime friend for all of us at Emergent. He’s a fellow coach, a colleague, who has what I’ll describe as a beautiful mastery and perspective on human interactions. Bill Berthel: Newell, welcome. Newell Eaton: Thank you, Bill. It’s really a pleasure to finally get around to having, ah, one of these conversations with you. Bill Berthel: Yeah, absolutely. Well, one that we’re going to get to record at least, right? Newell Eaton: Exactly. Bill Berthel: I always enjoy our conversations, and we were kind of joking just a moment ago that it’s a shame we only have, well, we have as much time as we want. We’ll only make about 20 minutes or so of this. We could talk all day. Newell Eaton: We sure could. Bill Berthel: So today’s topic is near and dear to both of us. It’s this idea of not knowing. The power of not knowing. Can you help me frame this concept of not just not knowing, but that there’s a power in not knowing? Newell Eaton: Yeah, it’s interesting because so often we have this notion that as leaders, we’re supposed to be competent and know. Right. Newell Eaton: We’re hired, we think, because we’re supposed to know, and we do know a lot, but there are many things we don’t know that sometimes we think we should know. Bill Berthel: Absolutely. Newell Eaton: And so from an integrity perspective, when we kind of pretend we know those things, we usually start to reduce. When people discover we fact don’t know, it really reduces trust. So as leaders, how do we recognize what we really do know? Right. Newell Eaton: And recognize the power of that. A lot of other people know things that we don’t know. I think the core power of not knowing is recognizing how do we count on others who might know. And ah, when we think about what’s the essence of leadership? A, leader is someone who can’t get it all done by themselves. They need others to get something they care about done. They care about that they try and find other people who care about it to come together to do something. Well, those other people are the ones that by asking them what they know to do stuff, they feel like, oh, their competence is being recognized, they become appreciated. So there’s a tremendous power in team creation by a leader who does not know certain things. Bill Berthel: Newell, I love how you just defined leadership in the way that it’s someone who can’t get it all done by themselves that really underscores what we’re talking about today. I think maybe I should speak about myself because
Peer to Supervisor Transition
Jan 18 2024
Peer to Supervisor Transition
In this episode, Ralph and Bill discuss identifying the key takeaways, insights, and concepts that we as leaders want our team members to remember, and perhaps more importantly, how we can help them apply those learnings to deliver positive results for the organization.     Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast, where we discuss leadership, team, and organizational topics and best practices. We like to provide ideas, concepts, and pragmatic experiments to help you develop your potential in your work and your leadership. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: Ralph, today we’re talking about a topic that actually, I think, often comes up for us in our coaching but this has been coming up as a request for us to talk about on a podcast. This is the movement of going from a peer to a supervisor entering leadership, but specifically from being a peer in a group or a team. Ralph Simone: Yeah, it’s uncomfortable for many people, but it’s really about a relationship change or relationship management. Bill Berthel: Yeah, absolutely. I think most people that are in this space, they are excited about the promotion, they’re excited about the opportunity they’re being provided. But they may be a little apprehensive, a little nervous, maybe even have some concerns about how will the relationships change. Ralph Simone: I think there’s initial fear, around awkwardness. It’s going to be awkward. How do I maintain my friendship while now becoming this person’s supervisor? Bill Berthel: Yeah, I think it is awkwardness. Not too long ago, I was coaching a very talented young man. He was a high performer in a somewhat technical role. It was in manufacturing. And he was becoming the shift supervisor. So kind of a classic peer-to-supervisor, peer-to-leadership kind of movement. And he knew all the players. They were mostly male. It was a manufacturing floor, but high-tech manufacturing floor. He had demonstrated all the knowledge and the skills and the ability, had all the aptitude for leadership. Great young man. His greatest concern was the dress code in their organization. Everyone in the leadership role needed to wear, like, a button-down shirt and chinos or slacks. He couldn’t wear jeans and a sweatshirt anymore. And he was so concerned about that disconnect. I found that both are endearing about him and real. Right. Because I think it is about the relationship. He didn’t want any disconnect to happen, and he was simply concerned that dressing differently meant something. Ralph Simone: Well, and it does, now it doesn’t have to, but I mean, I’m reminded of my days in Catholic school. One of the ways they leveled the playing field is that everyone wore a uniform. And that way there could be no discomfort created by people who had more or less discretionary income to buy clothing. And it was to keep the focus. So I can understand that discomfort. Bill Berthel: Yeah, absolutely. Ralph Simone: As I was preparing for this podcast, I was trying to think of my own transitions from peer to supervisor. And the one that was fairly challenging, although I think I navigated it reasonably well, was in college when I became an RA resident assistant, and I got placed on a floor with guys that I was friends with, that I was in class with, that we went out socially. Now I was going to be responsible for it. wasn’t exactly maintaining law and order, but let’s just put it that way. Bill Berthel: Close to that. Ralph Simone: And so it did create a bit of an awkward dynamic, no question about it. Bill Berthel
Wisdom From Charlie
Jan 4 2024
Wisdom From Charlie
In this episode, Ralph and Bill discuss identifying the key takeaways, insights, and concepts that we as leaders want our team members to remember, and perhaps more importantly, how we can help them apply those learnings to deliver positive results for the organization.     Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast, where we discuss leadership team and organizational topics and best practices. We like to provide ideas, concepts, and pragmatic experiments to help you develop your potential in your work and leadership. And today we have a special show with Ralph Simone, sharing some, life and leadership advice inspired from a book he just read. Bill Berthel: I’m Bill Berthel Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. And I am chomping at the bit. I was actually up at 04:00 a.m. And we had only planned to do one podcast today, and I got to the end of this book, and let’s end the suspense. It’s called the Book of Charlie. It’s on the New York Times bestseller list. The author is David von Drell, and the subtitle is wisdom from the remarkable American life of 109-year-old man. Bill Berthel: Oh, wow. Ralph Simone: And it was just a delightful book. It’s a little different than maybe some of the books I usually read and a lot of interesting stories. Now, what I was hoping for is that throughout the book that I would kind of dispense these words of wisdom. And, it wasn’t until the last few pages that the author kind of recounts a list of wisdom from Charlie White, the 109-year-old man, former, was a doctor, GP, and then an anesthesiologist. And I’d like to share some of them and talk about their connection to leadership. Bill Berthel: Oh, that’s great. Can’t wait to hear it. Ralph Simone: Yeah, the very first one. Ralph Simone: And we’ve seen this one on other podcasts, do the right thing. Bill Berthel: Yeah. Ralph Simone: I mean, when you have a choice, do the right thing. And I think we’ve talked about in the Ted Lasso podcast, doing the right thing is never the wrong thing to do. And sometimes we need to take that strategic pause. We need to check in with our conscience, with our values, to determine what that right thing is. Bill Berthel: I love grounding that in values, and I often think of that space of doing the right thing because we are subjective creatures and the situation could influence us differently. I was always subscribing to that. You do the right thing no matter who’s watching. And that’s your character showing up? That’s your character. Ralph Simone: So the second one, which I think is one that I’ve subscribed to, and I think it makes some of the people we work with go crazy, is think freely. I love this idea of thinking freely. Thinking for yourself, doing the research. Don’t just believe something just because someone said it, or even that you read it somewhere. Bill Berthel: So, free thinking to me, Ralph, is that beautiful space of creativity and it allows us for any and all possibilities. I think we suspend judgment and then we can think freely Ralph Simone: And we ask ourselves what could be? Bill Berthel: Absolutely. Ralph Simone: And it’s amazing. So tied to that, there was a long list and we’re only featuring a handful of them. Ralph Simone: Practice patience. Bill Berthel: That’s so hard. Ralph Simone: As a parent, as a coach, as a business owner, this idea, part of my purpose is to allow things to flow and unfold at their ow
So What, Now What?
Dec 21 2023
So What, Now What?
In this episode, Ralph and Bill discuss identifying the key takeaways, insights, and concepts that we as leaders want our team members to remember, and perhaps more importantly, how we can help them apply those learnings to deliver positive results for the organization.     Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors     Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast, where we discuss leadership, team, and organizational topics and best practices. We like to provide ideas, concepts, and pragmatic experiments to help you develop your potential in your work and your leadership. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: Ralph, I love the title of today’s podcast. So What, Now What? What are we talking about here? Ralph Simone: This was early in my consulting career, and I worked with a brilliant consultant by the name of Ron Cardis. And, we were working together delivering a course at Corning. And he said, whenever we do a module as part of this work, we need to be able to answer the question, so what now what? And I was intrigued by that. I don’t think back then I was even smart enough to understand it. Bill Berthel: Right. Ralph Simone: I liked it. It was catchy. But this idea of so what? What’s the key takeaway? What are the insights? What are the concepts that we want people to remember? And equally important, how can they apply them? What can they do with it? And I thought from a training and design standpoint, when we think about training that we do, when we think about the podcasts that we deliver, I think one of the things we want to answer both of those questions, so what that’s the concept. Now what? That’s the application. Bill Berthel: And so I’m hearing, both and balancing concept and application. I’m hearing the abstract and the concrete. I’m hearing what do I get? What insights can I pull from this? And then what do I do about it? What am I actually going to get done or practice? Ralph Simone: Exactly the fine line on the concept. Bill Berthel: Right. Ralph Simone: The abstract. Because I think we want to be careful not to be overly prescriptive. Bill Berthel: Right. Ralph Simone: Because there’s so many things that someone could extract from something. And it brings me back. Even though I’m an accounting major in college, I really loved the true liberal arts education. And what I loved about it and I think an important part of anything that we as leaders do is to get people to think for themselves, to think about thinking, to not necessarily give them the answer, but to share information that would allow them to create their own answers. I think that’s the abstract part, and I think we are looking for people to pull things from that abstraction. Leaders need to be able to abstract from content and apply it Bill Berthel: What do you think is getting in the way of abstracting? What do you think is getting in the way of thinking? Ralph Simone: Time. I mean, I always forget the title of this book, but it was a New York Times bestseller, and the author was an educator. And, she talked about how most people do not have the time or the attention span to read an entire book anymore because we’re getting hit with these sound bites and links and things. And so I think the perceived lack of ti
Context Matters to the Coach
Dec 7 2023
Context Matters to the Coach
Context is key. Until you understand the situation and its background, you can’t be effective as a leader or coach. With the context, you’re better prepared to ask relevant questions and share information that may be useful in helping someone move forward. Listen and learn more as Ralph and Bill discuss the importance of context.     Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors     Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast, where we discuss leadership, team, and organizational topics and best practices. We like to provide ideas, concepts, and pragmatic experiments to help you develop your potential in your work in leadership. I’m Bill Burthal. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: So Ralph, today we’re going to talk about another concept, another topic around leader as coach, and that is that the context matters to the coach. Context matters, Ralph Simone: We sometimes say in our weekly planning process, context before content. Bill Berthel: Yes. Ralph Simone: So you really need to understand the situation and maybe even some background to the situation before you can ask great questions before you can share information that may be helpful in moving someone forward. Bill Berthel: So this really starts with the desire to understand as a coach, as leader as coach, starting with understanding the context, the why of the client or employee, their situation, maybe what’s going on on their team, what’s going on in the organization that comes first. Ralph Simone: Absolutely. And I think we really have to slow down to go faster. If we’re internal leader as coach. I think sometimes we don’t know as much about our people as like an outside coach may know. We spend a fair amount of time in our coaching early on in the discovery process. We want to understand significant life experiences that, cause people to think and act the way they do. That’s part of context, part of imprinting. And then how are they bringing that or not bringing that into the current challenge or situation. Really important. Bill Berthel: Well, it’s part of our strategic approach as an external coach to start with that discovery. We have the right excuse because we’re typically starting a relationship. I think what gets in the way often, and I’ll go back to my days as being an internal coach, as an HR professional, I would assume I knew my people. Ralph Simone: Yeah. Bill Berthel: I’ve worked with them for lengths of time, some decades. And that assumption was there, that I knew those folks. And that assumption wasn’t necessarily wrong, but I would sometimes miss the specific situation they were in. I would rely on the experience in the relationship more than the current state. Ralph Simone: Yeah. Ralph Simone: More than current state. And more than how the current state might be triggering things. Their past that we’re not aware of. And I think just, one thing I can think of is we’ve talked about this in previous podcasts. Let’s release judgment. Let’s start this conversation as if I don’t know much about you. Bill Berthel: Fresh and new. Yeah. Ralph Simone: Beginner’s eyes. Because we bring too much preconceived information into it and then we don’t really understand the situation. We may not understand some of the or
Making the Coaching Connection
Nov 16 2023
Making the Coaching Connection
The first step to making a connection as a coach is building trust. There are several ways to accomplish this, including being fully present and focused, being genuinely curious, and using basic rapport-building tactics. Listen to learn practical techniques to establish a coaching connection and optimize your leadership skills.     Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors     Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast, where we discuss leadership, team and organizational topics and best practices. We like to provide ideas, concepts, and pragmatic experiments to help you develop your potential in your work and your leadership. I’m Bill Berthel Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: So Ralph, today we’re going to talk about making the coaching connection. Continuing this series around being a coach in your leadership leader. As coach, we know that making an, important connection with the people we’re coaching is a vital part. What does it mean to make a connection? Ralph Simone: This is actually a favorite topic of mine. In fact, it’s one of the things that I think it’s one of my few natural gifts, is my ability to make a connection. And I think it’s making a connection at a deeper, I’m almost going to say a soul level. It’s not just connecting intellectually, which is important, but it’s also connecting emotionally. It’s connecting with the person. It’s seeing the person right in front of you. I mean, one of the reasons people respond to coaching is sometimes they don’t feel like they’re being seen or heard, or whatever is going on. And so I think making that connection is really forming a bond of trust so that they trust that you’re sincerely and genuinely interested in whatever they’re dealing with and are interested in helping guide them through it. Not own it, not take it, but guide them through it. Bill Berthel: So, trust, we know that, I think it was Covey that said it’s the glue that holds all relationships together. But trust is a pretty complex thing. How do we build trust in this making of a connection? Ralph Simone: It’s an interesting question, but I think it’s part of holding the space. I think it’s part of how we show up. I think it’s maybe overused, but it’s really about being fully present. This is where, for me, one of the ways that I ensure I make the connection is I ground myself before any coaching conversation. I clear myself of any things that may be distracting for me as much as I can. It’s like akin to going into the dojo. When you go into a dojo to train for karate, you remove your shoes at the door and that’s symbolic for leaving your problems and experiences of the day behind so that you can be fully focused in the next hour of training. And I think for me, that’s how we make the connection. That’s how we build the trust. Bill Berthel: So I love that physical reminder of taking our shoes off. What do you do to get yourself ready when you’re coaching to be fully present? Ralph Simone: I actually clear my space and, so particularly if it’s a Zoom meeting or if it’s a phone call, I clear my space of anything that might distract me. I’ll take a couple of deep breaths and I’ll just kind of get quiet. And if there is something going on, I gently acknowledge it so that I can release it, so that I can be as focused as possible. And I sometimes even will say to a client or an employee, let’s just take a moment, let’s both o
Sharing Content as a Coach
Nov 2 2023
Sharing Content as a Coach
To be an effective coach, it’s often necessary to share content with team members. But the ability to share content well has two prerequisites – deep listening and intelligent questioning. Bill and Ralph discuss the concept and offer tips on how to hone your own listening and questioning skills and enhance your leadership.     Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors     Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast, where we discuss leadership, team, and organizational topics and best practices. We like to provide ideas, concepts, and pragmatic experiments to help you develop your potential in your work and leadership. I’m Bill Berthel Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: So, Ralph, as, another part of our series in talking about this coaching space for leaders, leaders as coach, coaches get to share content. They get to share some of their expertise. Sometimes it comes out as advice. This is really important for coaches to have some content to share. Ralph Simone: Yeah. And this is interesting for me. So my early career, I was a consultant, a subject matter expert. Bill Berthel: Yeah. Ralph Simone: And I love sharing my expertise. But the balancing act here, as we’ve been trained as coaches, is how do you strike the right balance between sharing what you know and drawing out of your client what he or she knows? So I think this is a stumbling block for professional coaches as well as leaders as coach. Bill Berthel: Yeah. No, I think so, too. And one of the biggest barriers to effective coaching is projecting too much of our experience, too much of our know how, too much of our subject matter expertise onto the person we’re coaching, whether that be our employee or our client. I think this type of projection, at best, can be received as advice that might get acted upon. But I think we miss that opportunity to really connect, grow the client, draw out their ideas, their best, and even worse as a leader. I think we might start to build a dependency on our advice. Ralph Simone: This links back then to consciousness Bill Berthel: very much, Ralph Simone: kind of being aware. Are we sharing too much too soon? Are we projecting our experiences or solution on, before we fully understand? Ralph Simone: So let’s talk about, for the benefit of our listeners, how we strike that balance of sharing content as a coach. Bill Berthel: So I think if we’re able to hold on to sharing that knowledge or expertise as a coach, as not first place, deep listening and intelligent questioning long before projecting our own brilliance, our own advice, our own subject matter expertise that I think we all like to share, by the way. I think we do. Yeah. We like to share that. Ralph Simone: It’s validating. We want to make a contribution. But what I heard you say in that is understand the challenge or the problem or the opportunity at hand before you prematurely dispense information that may or may not be useful. And I think there’s another thing that a leader and a coach needs to be mindful of. You have a position of maybe expertise or authority that people might be more inclined to pay attent
Consciousness in Coaching
Oct 19 2023
Consciousness in Coaching
In your leadership, it’s important to become highly self-aware – understanding and acknowledging how you “show up,” how your demeanor or behavior impacts others, and being able to adapt your approach to the situation. Then you’re better able to achieve the full promise of leadership – coaching others. In this episode, Bill and Ralph discuss consciousness and suggest practices that will help you sharpen your self-awareness.   Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors   Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast where we discuss leadership team and organizational topics and best practices. We like to provide ideas, concepts, and pragmatic experiments to help you develop your potential in your work and leadership. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: So Ralph, we’re going to be talking about, we’re going to have a series of four or so podcasts that really support this concept of leader as coach, the coaching modality in leadership. Love it. And today we want to talk about consciousness and coaching. Ralph Simone: I mean, that’s kind of a fancy word that I think it’s bantered about by people like ourselves, other coaching professionals. What do we mean when we talk about consciousness? And then specifically in coaching, Bill Berthel: I can get really distracted in this space with consciousness theory. There are two prevailing theories being discussed philosophically because so far science, Ralph is far, far behind in answering where consciousness comes from. This becomes an interesting philosophical debate, whether consciousness is a fundamental dynamic of the universe. This gets heavy, or if consciousness is an emergent property derived from physical stuff happening, atoms, chemicals, energy, having an experience. And I think this matters. This isn’t just philosophy because as leaders we need to know how to connect to our source of consciousness, so it matters where this comes from for ourselves, whichever might be true fundamentalism, materialism of emergent properties. By the way, I like the emergent properties idea. Of course, that’s our brand, right? What’s most important is that we connect to our consciousness that we become highly self-aware, very aware of. Ralph Simone: So that was coming up for me. If we could use the word awareness for the purpose of this conversation almost interchangeably, because we want to be aware of ourselves. Bill Berthel: I think so, yes. Ralph Simone: The things that motivate us, the things that make us impatient, the things that trigger us. Bill Berthel: I think so, yes. Ralph Simone: But it goes beyond just our own. Bill Berthel: It does, especially in this context of leadership and coaching. We do need to be in touch with our own self-awareness, and I think it starts there, but we also need to be socially aware of the people or the person we’re leading or coaching. We need to be able to dial into what are their feelings, their thoughts, their senses, their thought processes, what’s going on with them. Now we cannot have their experience. I’m not suggesting that, but we need to be able to dial in and relate to an awareness of their being. Ralph Simone: Bill, I’m curious about what we would say about the leader, and you and I have both interacted with the leader that says, I am a driven guy who is impatient and I’m totally aware of that. Would we describe that as someone demonstrating high levels of consciousness?
Leader as Coach
Oct 5 2023
Leader as Coach
Leaders need good leadership coaches, but can also act as coaches for their team. Doing so can improve organizational performance, engagement, culture, and morale. What key techniques should you employ to act as an effective coach? Listen in as Bill and Ralph discuss.   Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast. Our podcast is focused on individual team and organizational development and performance. We focus on topics such as leadership, human development, raising consciousness, and awareness. We aim to provide creative concepts, new ideas and pragmatic tips and practices for leaders in all walks of life. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: And today we’re going to revisit a podcast we originally released in the spring of 2023 called Leader as Coach. We’re putting this out again as a lead to a small series of podcasts on this topic, Leader as Coach. Ralph Simone: And I hope that doesn’t put us out of business, but what do we mean by this idea of leader as Coach Bill? Bill Berthel: Yeah, yeah. No, I love that challenge of putting us out of business. I think that’s actually part of our mission is that if we were no longer needed, the leadership in every organization would be reaching their potential. But let’s talk about this coaching modality, right? What coaching is to begin with leaders who coach really aren’t too different we think than athletic coaches. They’re capable and regularly practice highly directive and highly supportive leadership behaviors. We got to talk about what that looks like, Ralph, and I know you’ve got a lot to contribute to today’s conversation. Directive behaviors. Directive behaviors. Ralph Simone: I think people are hesitant just because of the word to tell people what’s needed, why it’s important to the organization and when it’s needed by just you use the example of a sports coach. Those things are all very clear and in some cases how to do it. In some cases, our role is to instruct people, and I was kind of laughing when we first started because I remember when I first added coaching to my business 20 years ago, my father wanted to know what sport, Bill Berthel: Right? Exactly. Ralph Simone: But it is the sport of corporate performance. And I think that while there are some differences, if we really looked at the leader coach model from the world of sports, I think both our performance and our consciousness would increase significantly. Would you agree? Bill Berthel: No, I love it. I love it. I think when clarity, when structure, maybe fundamentals and direction is needed, a good leader coach doesn’t hesitate and they know just the right amount to dial in the right amount of direction too much, and you’re that micromanager. I think that’s some of the hesitation. We don’t want to micromanage. We don’t want to over control too little. You’re causing unnecessary ambiguity and confusion. Ralph Simone: We want to find the sweet spot and I think we find the sweet spot through experimentation, but what you can’t do is not do it. Now, we talked about directive, but you used another word leader as coach, supportive. And what do we mean by supportive behavior? Bill Berthel: Yeah, so supportive behavior. So 87% of American workforce is moderately to highly capable, meaning their skills, their knowledge, their abilities are proficient or better. However, their commitmen
Conditions for Speaking Up
Sep 21 2023
Conditions for Speaking Up
In this episode, Bill and Ralph discuss the value of changing our thinking about the way we solve problems. When we think of problem-solving as polarity management  –  that is, managing two forces that are interdependent but seemingly opposite of one another, we can reap tremendous benefits for ourselves personally, and for our teams and organizations. Listen to learn more about the concept and get ideas about how you can introduce polarity management to your leadership.   Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors   Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast where we discuss leadership team and organizational topics and best practices. We like to provide ideas, concepts, and pragmatic experiments to help you develop your potential in your work and your leadership. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: Ralph, great topic today, the conditions for speaking up, what is the space of folks not speaking up? What’s happening? Ralph Simone: Well, I think a lot of our coaching experience is coaching people to have those missing or pivotal conversations. And as I was thinking about this, this is kind of a both/and opportunity. We need to have the structure and culture in place so people feel safe and comfortable speaking up. On the other hand, as an employee, I need to have the courage and I think take the responsibility that if I see it, I need to say it and perhaps even do something about it. So I think it’s not just one or the other. The culture and the employees have to be working to mitigate what we would refer to as missing conversations. Bill Berthel: Oh, absolutely. Having a culture of that psychological safety, that term of psychological safety means that people do feel safe to share ideas, speak up, and possibly if needed disagree. Sometimes speaking up is disagreeing. It doesn’t always have to be, but we have that sense that I’m going to be emotionally safe in this space. Something I say won’t be held against me. Ralph Simone: And I think for our listeners, I want to make the distinction that you may be a very open, very personal, very kind individual, but sometimes your passion around a particular topic could make it difficult for people to speak up. And I have a recent example where in our organization, I’m the founder. I’ve been around practicing this leadership development and coaching the longest, and we introduced a topic and we had our extended team at this meeting. And it was a topic that I felt strongly about, really passionate about, and instead of waiting my turn and giving people, I just kind of went full bore with how I felt it needed to be. And I didn’t catch it real-time, but I reflected a few minutes later. Now our newest guy, if he saw it differently, I don’t know that I created the conditions for him to speak up. So sometimes it can be just by how passionately we feel about something, we can make it uneasy for others to see it differently or to challenge our perspective. Bill Berthel: That’s a great point, Ralph. Recently I’m working with a client and it’s about a year-long program, multiple workshops and meetings with the same cohort group. And really everyone in the group is wonderful and really bright. This one individual approached me through email and said, I really want to share some content with you, but I’m really hesitant to do that because you seem so well-rea
Stop Solving Problems
Sep 7 2023
Stop Solving Problems
In this episode, Bill and Ralph discuss the value of changing our thinking about the way we solve problems. When we think of problem-solving as polarity management  –  that is, managing two forces that are interdependent but seemingly opposite of one another, we can reap tremendous benefits for ourselves personally, and for our teams and organizations. Listen to learn more about the concept and get ideas about how you can introduce polarity management to your leadership.   Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors   Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent podcast where we discuss leadership team and organizational topics and best practices. We like to provide ideas, concepts, and pragmatic experiments to help you develop your potential in your work and leadership. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: So we have a, I think a really important topic today of not solving problems, Ralph. Ralph Simone: Wait a minute, problem. What am I going to do? Bill Berthel: I think that is going to be the reaction to reading that title. I think that’s why people are tuning today because, and it’s really normal. It’s really, really normal. It makes sense. Most of us were educated and were conditioned to solve problems. Every test you took in school was to solve a problem, whether that was solving an equation in math or writing an essay, or basically solving a problem to make that condition even more sticky. Most of us are rewarded for our problem-solving abilities, and we’re proud to be problem-solvers. I can’t tell you how many leaders I talk to that say I’m an excellent problem solver and that’s wonderful. There are problems to be solved. Ralph Simone: Perhaps I was ahead of my time. I don’t think I did a lot of problem-solving in my early academic career. Bill Berthel: I think our listeners happen to have two guys talking to him that are good at this polarity management space, not solving problems, but really identifying when it’s not a problem to solve, but a set of polls to manage. Ralph Simone: What I’m surprised at, a couple things. One is, the terminology people are unfamiliar with most people we talk to, and secondly, can we give some examples? Because I think once we provide some examples of not solving a problem, but managing polarity, I think it comes to light for people and then I think they’re able to start to see some of their organizational challenges through a different lens. Bill Berthel: Absolutely. Absolutely. So this polarity management model is managing two forces that are interdependent, yet seemingly opposite of one another. A basic example, one of my favorite examples is breathing. So breathing consists of many biological activities, right? But let’s simplify breathing by focusing on inhaling and exhaling, right? Two interdependent forces, right? But very two opposite forces, right? Inhaling and exhaling. One way to test if they’re polar or opposite enough to fit this structure is attempt to do both at the same time. Go ahead, try it. Listeners, while you’re listening, try to inhale and exhale at the same time. Ralph Simone: Yeah, you can’t do that. Bill Berthel: You’re not doing it. No matter how you think you might be doing it, you’re not
Handoffs Don’t Require a Title
Aug 17 2023
Handoffs Don’t Require a Title
In many organizations, an enormous amount of time and energy is wasted by sloppy handoffs. Effective requests and delegation require the confidence to hand off tasks to the people best equipped for the task, regardless of their role or title. Ralph and Bill discuss the importance of getting past hierarchy and making the task the boss.   Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors   Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent Podcast, where we discuss leadership, team and organizational topics and best practices. We like to provide ideas, concepts, and pragmatic experiments to help you develop your potential in your work and leadership. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: Ralph. Today’s episode has us talking about making really clean handoffs. Ralph Simone: Yeah, a big opportunity. I have a lot of energy on this because I think a lot of time and energy is wasted because many of our handoffs and organizations are sloppy. Think about in terms of a football quarterback. You know, sometimes the quarterback hangs on to the ball too long. I think a lot of leaders, a lot of people in organizations hang on to the task way too long. They’re not willing to offload it or delegate it, or we give it to the wrong person. Or when we give it to ’em, we do it in such a sloppy way that the ball gets dropped. And I think that we also have to keep in mind that sometimes hierarchy and titles get in the way of handing the ball off to the right person. And so we’re all, we’re gonna talk about all of that in today’s podcast. Bill Berthel: You know, I, I don’t follow football, but there is something really beautiful about a clean pass, a really tight, clean, accurate paths that, has to feel good to the whole team. Ralph Simone: We’re talking about executing. Yeah, we’re talking about identifying what’s most important and handing it off to the person or persons best able to execute it. And that requires, I think, a couple things. Purpose, right, and, and clarity of what you’re handing off. Yeah. I read an interesting quote in a book, I’m just finishing up called Attitude Written by Jay Wright, the former Villanova University basketball coach, and I think he was quoting the priest who was, like the team’s spiritual advisor. And the quote was, everyone’s role is different. Their status is the same. And that really resonated with me for making better handoffs. And that handoffs don’t require a title. Right? So everybody in an organization, right, their their role is different. But their status is the same. They have this unique gift, this unique ability to contribute to the organization. And And people value it. People value it. You know, sometimes I think that hierarchy, and informal caste systems get in the way of asking for what’s needed and asking the person that you need it, of it, it gets in the way. Bill Berthel: I bet that gets in the way in all directions that you know that, that hierarchy of, can I hand something off to my boss? Can I trust someone, quote unquote, under me to hand this off to I, I bet that structure gets in the way in all directions. Ralph Simone: Absolutely. And so, you know, everybody has a responsibility. Reminds me of a, of a story which a former employer place I worked. This is where hierarchy gets in the way. I was invited to participate in a. Customer service or client s
Disruptive Leadership
Aug 3 2023
Disruptive Leadership
Some effective leaders could be described as disruptive. But of course, we’re thinking of disruption as a constructive force – challenging the status quo, innovating, committing to lifelong learning and experimentation, being agile, and having the ability to adapt and change. It’s about breaking rules with purpose. Listen as Bill and Ralph discuss disruptive leadership, its value in strengthening teams and organizations, and how you can become a proactive disruptor.   Prefer to read the transcript? *Note: The following text is the output of transcribing from an audio recording. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases may be incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors   Bill Berthel: Welcome to the Get Emergent Podcast, where we discuss leadership, team and organizational topics and best practices. We like to provide ideas, concepts, and pragmatic experiments to help you develop your potential in your work and leadership. I’m Bill Berthel. Ralph Simone: And I’m Ralph Simone. Bill Berthel: Ralph, I love today’s topic of disruptive leadership. Ralph Simone: I love it too because I think it’s been my whole life. Just, we disrupt things because we want to have a better outcome. We wanna have a better process. And, and I think it’s, we need to set the record straight. A leader’s role is to be disruptive. And disruptive is constructive, not destructive, because we wanna, it’s, it’s like breaking things before it’s too late. Right. It’s reinventing ourselves. It’s, it’s innovating and I think part of the work we do as coaches is we are trying to be a disruptive force by asking people questions to get them to think differently about their current habits of thought and patterns of behavior. Bill Berthel: Yeah, absolutely. It’s, it’s challenging the status quo. It is rule breaking with purpose. It’s, I love how you said disruptive. As a constructive force, not disruption in some type of negative way, but it’s really looking at what could be new, what could be possible, what haven’t we stepped into that we’d like to experiment with? Ralph Simone: What’s constraining in ourselves, you know, we’ve talked about that fish notice water last. We get immersed into a culture. We get immersed into a particular way of being and it may not be inclusive, it may not be something that takes full advantage of all the resources, and we need somebody to, we talk about this responsibly complaining that’s being disruptive. Asking for something that doesn’t currently exist in the environment so that we can get a better outcome for the organization and for more of the employees. Bill Berthel: The space of disruptive leadership is similar to disruptive innovation where we see a set of existing variables, whether it’s in a market, there’s certain products, whether that is, there’s certain operating. Ground rules in our organization. There’s certain ways we’re doing things. We’re interested in getting in and tweaking ’em, maybe even breaking ’em to see what could possibly emerge for new purpose. Ralph Simone: I mean, look at what Musk did with Tesla. Yeah. Regardless of what you think of him as a leader or not. He certainly was disruptive. I mean, he was, the technology was disruptive. He wasn’t able to market and distribute through the normal channels, so he disrupted that channel, right? And what you’re seeing is, you know, sometimes disruption does require somebody to swim upstream, to take some unpopular stances, but look at what i