Southern Soul - Live Stream

Calvin Baldwin

Want to know more, learn more, be more or just be? Southern Soul Live Stream is the place for you. We spotlight engaging guests, discuss current events and pay special attention to inspiring generations. Most importantly, we share truth, creativity and encouragement with our listeners to nurture, heal and inspire them to make the world a better place. Want to listen to our next episode live? Join us on Thursdays at 7pm CT / 8pm ET to kick back and enjoy the eclectic vibe in real time. To register, visit SouthernSoulPodcast.com and click “Join Podcast.” We can’t wait to have you!

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The Future of Work: Navigating The New Employee Contract
Sep 13 2022
The Future of Work: Navigating The New Employee Contract
“There's now this notion that you, as an individual, are an independent agent, and you can determine what your career path looks like,” explains Alex Smith, HR executive for the City of Memphis. In today’s episode, host D-Rich sits down with guests Alex Smith and Nona Austin-King, CEO of Career Catalyst Group, to discuss the future of work and how employee expectations and desires have changed thanks to technological advancements, societal shifts, generational differences, and of course, the pandemic.   Growing up, most of us were taught that we would go to college, get a job, stay with that company forever and then retire. However, that’s just not the norm anymore. In fact, there has been a large shift, in part propelled by the pandemic, where employees are taking control of their career paths. Now, people are looking more for flexible and remote opportunities where they can temporarily grow a skill set rather than provide a lifetime commitment. In response, employers have an evolved understanding of what the employer-employee relationship entails and realize that people are not necessarily looking to be tied into the same role long term anymore. Thanks to this, the relationship is on more equal footing and employees often hold more power at work than they realize.    The future of work is happening right now. The expectation of a long term employment relationship is mostly a thing of the past and employees have more control than ever before over their own career paths. Join Nona Austin-King, Alex Smith, and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about how the idea of work has changed throughout recent years and what employers and employees alike should anticipate for the future.    Quotes • “The thing that I have been most surprised about is going through this process is not just about landing a role. It is helping people to build that self confidence again, elevating their mindset, and really just rediscovering the excellence that's already inside of them. There is no magic pill, it's already inside of you.” (10:57-11:24 | Nona) • “The term ‘future of work’ means changing the way businesses run based on technological advances, generational changes, social shifts, but the reality is the future of career management, the future of work, is right now.” (16:42-17:01 | Nona) • “I believe that a lot of us have the skills needed in the future, but we just need to be able to identify that in a story.“ (18:27-18:42 | Nona) • “When many of us were growing up, or even when we talked to our parents, they gave us this whole adage about, you're going to go to college, get a job, and work for a company for 25 years, retire. And there was this whole sense of having this long term employment relationship with an organization of some sort, and you do your time, and you're able to retire and move on with your life. But nowadays, it is very different.” (40:26-40:54 | Alex) • “There's now this notion that you as an individual are an independent agent, and you can determine what your career path looks like, and chart that out. And you can design it the way that you want.” (41:56-42:07 | Alex) • “That's the new contract. That's the future of work now. This idea that people can move and be very transient, that they can work from home or work in hybrid environments, that they can be in an independent contracting space, or they can also be a full time employee. But they have flexibility to decide how they want to work and when they want to work.” (42:21-42:42 | Alex)   Links   Connect with Nona Austin-King, CEO of Career Catalyst Group: Website - - -   Connect with Alex Smith, HR Executive City of Memphis: Website - www.consultalexsmith.comLinkedin -   About with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism; buy us  A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio recording “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
The Future of Work: Navigating The New Employee Contract
Sep 13 2022
The Future of Work: Navigating The New Employee Contract
“There's now this notion that you, as an individual, are an independent agent, and you can determine what your career path looks like,” explains Alex Smith, HR executive for the City of Memphis. In today’s episode, host D-Rich sits down with guests Alex Smith and Nona Austin-King, CEO of Career Catalyst Group, to discuss the future of work and how employee expectations and desires have changed thanks to technological advancements, societal shifts, generational differences, and of course, the pandemic.   Growing up, most of us were taught that we would go to college, get a job, stay with that company forever and then retire. However, that’s just not the norm anymore. In fact, there has been a large shift, in part propelled by the pandemic, where employees are taking control of their career paths. Now, people are looking more for flexible and remote opportunities where they can temporarily grow a skill set rather than provide a lifetime commitment. In response, employers have an evolved understanding of what the employer-employee relationship entails and realize that people are not necessarily looking to be tied into the same role long term anymore. Thanks to this, the relationship is on more equal footing and employees often hold more power at work than they realize.    The future of work is happening right now. The expectation of a long term employment relationship is mostly a thing of the past and employees have more control than ever before over their own career paths. Join Nona Austin-King, Alex Smith, and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about how the idea of work has changed throughout recent years and what employers and employees alike should anticipate for the future.    Quotes • “The thing that I have been most surprised about is going through this process is not just about landing a role. It is helping people to build that self confidence again, elevating their mindset, and really just rediscovering the excellence that's already inside of them. There is no magic pill, it's already inside of you.” (10:57-11:24 | Nona) • “The term ‘future of work’ means changing the way businesses run based on technological advances, generational changes, social shifts, but the reality is the future of career management, the future of work, is right now.” (16:42-17:01 | Nona) • “I believe that a lot of us have the skills needed in the future, but we just need to be able to identify that in a story.“ (18:27-18:42 | Nona) • “When many of us were growing up, or even when we talked to our parents, they gave us this whole adage about, you're going to go to college, get a job, and work for a company for 25 years, retire. And there was this whole sense of having this long term employment relationship with an organization of some sort, and you do your time, and you're able to retire and move on with your life. But nowadays, it is very different.” (40:26-40:54 | Alex) • “There's now this notion that you as an individual are an independent agent, and you can determine what your career path looks like, and chart that out. And you can design it the way that you want.” (41:56-42:07 | Alex) • “That's the new contract. That's the future of work now. This idea that people can move and be very transient, that they can work from home or work in hybrid environments, that they can be in an independent contracting space, or they can also be a full time employee. But they have flexibility to decide how they want to work and when they want to work.” (42:21-42:42 | Alex)   Links   Connect with Nona Austin-King, CEO of Career Catalyst Group: Website - - -   Connect with Alex Smith, HR Executive City of Memphis: Website - www.consultalexsmith.comLinkedin -   About with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism; buy us  A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio recording “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
What My Eyes Have Seen - Reflections on Justice, Identity, & Reparations
Sep 9 2022
What My Eyes Have Seen - Reflections on Justice, Identity, & Reparations
“Whether you grew up in a predominately Black space, or a predominately white space, you're probably going to have a racialized moment at some point in America. And you have to figure out what you're going to do with that racialized moment. Is that going to derail you or is going to put you on a new path to think about race in a slightly different way?” asks Dr. Kris Marsh, Professor at the University of Maryland. In today’s episode host D-Rich sits down with guests Dr. Kris Marsh and Kiara Williams, Esq., Co-Founder of the Auditory Museum and radio host, for part two of a two-part series titled, “What My Eyes Have Seen” which focuses on generational stories.    Both Dr. Marsh and Kiara grew up in predominantly white environments. Kiara shares that she did not have a Black teacher prior to fifth grade and until that moment, she had formed the assumption that white people were naturally smarter. When children grow up without connections to their race in the people around them, they lose touch with a large part of their identity and have to unlearn preconceived biases made based on their environments. Dr. Marsh shares that anti-blackness is woven into basically all social institutions in America and although the racism is slightly less overt now, it is no less traumatizing to experience. In order for real and impactful change to occur, reparations must be performed on a federal level.    Whether you grow up in a predominantly white area or a predominantly Black one, you will inevitably encounter radicalized racism at some point. Unfortunately, the undercurrent of racism runs deep throughout America and has created lasting trauma that all Black people must learn to analyze and face. Join Dr. Kris Marsh, Kiara Williams, Esq., and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about racism in academia, mental health disparities within the Black community, and why Black Americans deserve reparations.    Quotes • “If you were to take away every title, mother, father, teacher, engineer, lawyer, radio host, you were to take away all of those titles, who are you at your core?” (15:46-15:56 | Kiara) • “I have a lot of Black friends who have never had the experience of having a Black teacher. Many of them have spent their lives thinking they hated science, or they were bad at math, when really they just had a hard time connecting with their teachers.” (23:05-23:15 | Kiara) • “Whether you grew up in a predominately Black space, or a predominately white space, you're probably going to have a racialized moment at some point in America. And you have to figure out what you're going to do with that racialized moment. Is that going to derail you or is going to put you on a new path and think about race in a slightly different way?” (35:50-36:06 | Dr. Kris) • “What happens with racism now is we can't always name it and claim it because you didn't explicitly call me the N word. And so it's harder for us to kind of tease it out and think through it. And it can be traumatizing for black folks having to always think about that.” (39:01-39:15 | Dr. Kris) • “Anti-Blackness happens in any social institution in America. Why? Because we know race is the linchpin that holds America together and race is the linchpin that built America.” (50:55-51:06 | Dr. Kris)  • “For every dollar of wealth held by a white person, a Black person holds 10 cents of wealth, relative to that dollar.” (1:05:28-1:05:37 | Dr. Kris) • “To really be impactful, the federal government owes Black Americans reparations, it should not be at the individual level, it should be a federal law.” (1:06:14-1:06:24 | Dr. Kris)   Links Kiara Imani Williams - Isn’t Just for White People Book -   Kiara Imani Williams, Esq., is a co-founder of The Auditory Museum - a company specializing in communication and corporate storytelling. She is a graduate of the University of Virginia School of Law, and received her bachelor's degree from the University of Virginia in 2011 with a major in political science, specifically focusing on politics in the media. In the past, she has worked for the FCC, PBS, MTV Networks, Fox News Networks, Modern Viewpoint Magazine, Disney ABC Television Networks, and the Student Press Law Center. Kiara is author of Therapy Isn’t Just For White People.   Dr. Kris Marsh Kris Marsh received her PhD from the University of Southern California in 2005. She was a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina before joining the faculty of the University of Maryland where she has been tenured since 2014. Currently, Professor Marsh is writing a book (The Love Jones Cohort: A New Face of the Black Middle Class) for Cambridge University Press on the wealth, health, residential choices and dating practices of an emerging Black middle class that is single and living alone. About with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us  A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio recordings “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
What My Eyes Have Seen - Reflections on Taboos, Secrecy & Silence
Sep 2 2022
What My Eyes Have Seen - Reflections on Taboos, Secrecy & Silence
“What was really fascinating for me in the course of writing about some of my own trauma was that my parents never really talked to me about racism,” shares Bettye Walker, Owner of B. Walker Consultants with more than three decades of professional experience in advisory leadership and administrative capacities. In today’s episode host D-Rich sits down with guests Bettye Walker and Kathy Murray, Owner of Fit Bodies Inc, for part one of a two-part series titled, “What My Eyes Have Seen” which focuses on generational stories. Here, Bettye and Kathy reflect on their experiences growing up as baby boomers and Black women.   As a child, Bettye did not have the voice or the understanding to really process or speak out about the racism she encountered during her schooling. Growing up in a military family and being educated in a multicultural environment, Bettye was shocked that when her family returned to the states, she was forced into a segregated learning environment. Bettye struggled academically until she graduated from high school because she had not been properly prepared to transition into a formal Black schoolhouse. She was too young to comprehend all of the differences like the schoolhouse’s lack of a library or a formal cafeteria .And being raised by parents from “the Silent Generation” meant that racism was not discussed.    In addition to navigating racism, there can be cultural challenges for Black Americans as well. Kathy shares that when she moved to Germany to be a fitness educator she did not even think about the implications of being Black until she was there and experiencing racism and anti-American sentiment all at once. She had difficulties even securing an apartment for herself due to her race and even her white American colleagues faced discrimination due to their nationality.    Baby boomers grew up during the time of Jim Crow laws and had unique experiences as a result of segregation. As children, it was difficult to understand the full extent of the racism being witnessed on a daily basis. Join Bettye Walker, Kathy Murray, and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about what it was like to grow up as a baby boomer and how those experiences with racism have shaped the generation as a whole.  Quotes • “What was really fascinating for me in the course of writing about some of my own trauma was that my parents never really talked to me about racism. They never prepared me to transition from a multicultural learning environment and into a formal black schoolhouse.” (4:51-5:09 | Bettye) • “As a child, you can't really process what's happening to you, you just do things because your parents tell you to do it. So there was that dynamic of really not being able to have a voice because I didn't know what voice to have as a child. I think it's important that adults and parents recognize that it is important to be able to be advocates for our children.” (11:48-12:14 | Bettye) • “Unfortunately for a lot of us, we've gone through the problem and issues, but we never recovered from it. And to me, that's where the trauma comes in..” (22:30-22:50 | Bettye) • “The challenge is cultural because not only did I have to go through a lot of racism, but anti-American. So I even found some of my white counterparts were being discriminated against because we were American. So it was kind of a double-edged sword there.” (41:51-42:12 | Kathy) • “Don't be afraid to fail. No one likes to step out of their comfort zone. My advice would be to definitely go ahead and jump in, and the opportunity will come.” (52:29-52:59 | Kathy)    Links   Bettye Walker, Owner of B.Walker Consultants -   Free 30-minute Consultation -   Kathy Murray, Kathy Murray owner Fit Bodies Inc -   Kathy's book is The Munich Cowboys Cheerleaders: A Novella - with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode? Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us  A Coffee!  Join The ShowExperience our live studio recordings “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
The Future of Public Education with Thom Jackson, Esq and LaShanda Jackson
Aug 4 2022
The Future of Public Education with Thom Jackson, Esq and LaShanda Jackson
“It's not about whether our kids can learn, it’s about how we engage them as critical thinkers and how teachers engage those students,” explains Thom Jackson, Esq, President and CEO at EdisonLearning. In today’s episode host D-Rich sits down with guests Thom Jackson and LaShanda Jackson, Extension Instructor at Michigan State University to talk about the future of public education and how to reduce the achievement gap between white students and students of color.    There are a lot of factors to consider when looking into why students of color often fall behind their white peers in education. In order to truly understand why kids are struggling and turn the tides for them, one must look at their entire learning and home environments. Is the school a safe learning environment where students feel free to engage with their teachers and classmates? Are they getting the proper nutrition? Oftentimes children of color are growing up in situations that are not conducive to learning. For example, they may have repeated exposure to chemicals like lead in their food and water supplies, they may not have access to early education, or they may be held back a grade at a critical time in their development. When kids are more engaged and able to utilize their critical thinking skills, their academic performance improves exponentially. Unengaged kids who constantly have their heads down or don’t care enough to pay attention are more likely to fail, be held back, and ultimately to drop out of school. All kids learn differently and it is important to determine how each student learns best in order to get them fully engaged in their own education.   Join Thom Jackson Esq., LaShanda Jackson, and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about the difficulties facing public education and what needs to be done to ensure better outcomes for children of color.    Quotes • “If you're not putting the proper food inside your body, how can you even feed your brain the right way? Your first brain is your stomach.” (21:32-21:40 | LaShanda)  • “Our kids are dealing with lead paint, not only in water, but in the piping that's used. They're dealing with the paint on the walls, in the air that they're breathing, and all of these atmospheres, and we ask ourselves these questions about why are our kids in certain neighborhoods underperforming in education, and we've yet not linked it to the very environmental conditions in which we have these kids growing up.” (32:36-33:00 | Thom) • “It's not about whether our kids can learn. It’s about how we engage them as critical thinkers, and how teachers engage those students.” (48:33-48:42 | Thom)  • “When we say equity, we're saying, let's make sure that every child has access to the tools that will help them become the best student that they could possibly be.” (49:01-49:11 | Thom)   Links Thom Jackson, Esq President & CEO at EdisonLearning:   LaShanda Jackson, Michigan State University Extension Instructor:   with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us  A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio recordings “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
GOOD TROUBLE & Discomfort - Navigating Fragility & Mythology
Jul 28 2022
GOOD TROUBLE & Discomfort - Navigating Fragility & Mythology
“If you are white, therefore, you are American. So where does that put everyone else who isn’t?” inquires Suzette Chang, Cultural Anthropologist, Founder, and CEO of Thick Descriptions. In today’s episode host D-Rich sits down with guests Suzette Chang, Speaker Vic Sorrell, and Anti-Racism Leadership Coach Jill Nagle to talk about white supremacy mythology and how to navigate white fragility when speaking about racism.    White people tend to look at racism as an intentional action, one they as “good white people” would never participate in. However, due to whiteness being the structural basis for socialization, white people cannot escape the inherent biases that result from the socialization process. White supremacy is a mythology in that it is an invented belief system that has been woven into our society to keep white people in power while keeping Black and Brown people in oppressive situations for hundreds of years. In order to make progress radicalizing white people to be anti-racist, they have to first understand that racism is not about being a good or bad person. And speaking about race is not in itself a racist undertaking. White people often become uncomfortable anytime race is mentioned, especially if they are addressed as “white” because of the stigma built into society around racism as a morality issue rather than a structural one. To become anti-racist, they must recognize themselves as living in a world where their whiteness is not racialized in the way that every other race is.    Join Suzette Chang, Vic Sorrell, Jill Nagle, and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about navigating discomfort and fragility when addressing the myth of white supremacy and its consequences.    Quotes • “When people of color, for instance, are willing to take the risk of letting a white person know how something that they did or said could be racist, a lot of times this simple word racism, the simple term racist, because of the fact that white fragility is so real, will shut down a white person to the point that they can't hear anything. They can't hear the gift that they are being given. They can't listen. Because they're so distracted with the way our society has shaped racism to the point that it isn't able to be perpetuated.” (24:11-25:05 | Vic)  • “When we keep racism in the context of good and bad people, then we spend more time as white people defending our moral character than we ever do listening to how our socialization is coming out of us.” (27:59-28:10 | Vic) • “If you are white, therefore, you are American. So where does that put everyone else who isn’t?” (33:01-33:08 | Suzette) • “The term white really does not exist, it was created. And so there was a time where to be white meant you were male, Christian, and you owned land. So that meant Jews weren’t white. That meant Protestants weren't white. It did not speak to phenotype. It was not a biological factor. It was a status, it was a privilege. So this has existed before America was born.” (37:05-37:48 | Suzette) • “How do we as white people solve this heinous, horrific, yet again fatal problem of white supremacy?” (44:50-45:03 | Jill)  • “These white people who are committing murders are expressing for the collective white body. The collective distress of white supremacy and mythology. They're expressing a psychosis which is not simply of their making. This is 400 years in the making. And they are only the most visible and most fatal expressions of that psychosis.” (46:51-47:19 | Jill) • “When we talk about white supremacy mythology, I'm referring to the incorrect beliefs which are this notion that white people are somehow superior to others. Which is not true, of course. But it's so deeply woven into our thoughts, the music that plays in a mall, who the superheroes on TV are, who's considered beautiful, meritorious, worthwhile, important, who makes us comfortable. And it's been dictated by white comfort zones.” (49:54-50:32 | Jill)   Links   Connect with Suzette Chang: Suzette’s Website Suzette’s LinkedinSuzette’s Instagram   Resources “Working Toward Whiteness (How America's Immigrants Became White)” by David R. Roediger How Jews Became White Folks and What That Says About Race in America The Everyday Language of White Racism     Connect with Vic Sorrell: Vic’s Instagram Vics’ Linkedin  Vic's Resources Robin DiAngelo's Book: White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism What’s My Complicity? Talking White Fragility With Robin DiAngelo  Connect with Jill Nagle: Jill’s Website  Jill’s Linkedin    Jill's Resources White People: Lean In, Hang out and Talk with the “Other” White People Please Our Big, Fat, White Dysfunctional Family White-on-white, for Anti-racists  About Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio recordings “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
Child Mental Health & School Related Stress
Jul 25 2022
Child Mental Health & School Related Stress
“The first thing we need to do as parents is step back and listen to our kids about what they need, but also take ourselves out of it. My kid’s success is not about me,” explains Dr. Toi Curry, Licensed Clinical Psychologist with specializations in neuropsychology and school psychology.  In today’s episode host D-Rich sits down with guests Dr. Toi Curry and Board Certified Pediatrician Dr. Monica Moore to discuss school related stress and how it impacts childrens’ mental health.    The COVID pandemic has been both good and bad for children’s mental health. In one respect, more children than before are struggling with depression and clinical levels of anxiety from isolation and disrupting their routines. But on the other hand, there is now a lot more awareness being dedicated to children’s mental health. Where before parents may not have been able to pick up on changes in their child’s mood or behavior, being stuck at home with them opened up more opportunities to notice these changes. There has also been a reduction in the stigma associated with seeking care for mental health in the wake of the pandemic, which helps parents to be a little less wary of bringing their child in for evaluation. Children do not exist in a vacuum, nor do they have adult level coping skills for handling and understanding their emotions, so it is very important for parents and caregivers like teachers and pediatricians to really pay attention to behavioral signs.    Join Dr. Monica Moore, Dr. Toi Curry, and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about how to reduce school related stressors, and best support children struggling with their mental health.    Quotes • “We have to make sure that we're checking on each other. Because sometimes you say, ‘Oh, they're fine, they're good, they're stronger,’ but you just never know what an individual may be going through.” (19:17-19:26 | Dr. Monica) • “If a parent is concerned, or a teacher has some concerns, the first step would be to end up at the pediatrician for the initial conversation. And so after having that conversation, assessing what's going on, then the referral would be for psychological testing, or specifically, if there's a concern, maybe for autism. So there's certain testing that can be done. But the initial conversation usually does happen with that child's pediatrician.” (26:57-27:32 | Dr. Monica) • “COVID has been a blessing and a curse in terms of mental health. Because what I've seen and similar, what Dr. Monica mentioned, is that there is an increase in anxiety and increase in depression across the board, adults and children. But there is an increase of awareness with children.” (42:59-43:18 | Dr. Toi) • “Children are not little adults, they experience things differently. But the reality is, adults are just big children. And so the things that adults experience, children are also experiencing, but with fewer resources to cope.” (47:30-47:43 | Dr. Toi) • “Kids will exhibit irritability, frustration, clinginess, inattention, hyperactivity, all kinds of behaviors, and sometimes us adults go, ‘why is that child acting out? What's going on?’ We miss the reason for the behavior because we're so focused on the behavior and correcting the behavior, right? We don't want them acting out in the store. So we're putting all this pressure on them. Don't do this. Don't do that. Well, that's just adding to their stress.” (48:58-49:29 | Dr. Toi) • “Kids don't know how to be bored anymore. Boredom is not a negative thing. Boredom increases creativity. Boredom forces you to use your imagination, boredom forces you to problem solve. Kids don't know how to do that, because they've not had those opportunities.” (53:31-53:46 | Dr. Toi) • “The first thing we need to do as parents is step back and listen to our kids about what they need, but also take ourselves out of it. My kid’s success is not about me.” (58:59-59:11 | Dr. Toi)   Links and Resources African Americans, Afro-Caribbean Americans, And AddictionChildren's Mental Health is in Crisis Report  Virtual Pediatrician Dr. Monica Moore, MD  Websites @drmonicacares Girls Growing Gracefully Non Profit Be Unique: A Girl's Guide to Self-Awareness and Self-Acceptance    Resources for Children's Mental Health www.childmind.org, www.psychologytoday.com, www.therapyforblackgirls.com, www.strong4life.com   Dr. Toi Curry, PsyD -   Resources for Children's Mental Health:  www.adaa.org, www.chadd.org, www.mhanational.org, www.boystown.org   About with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us  A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio recordings “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
Women of Color Entrepreneurship Ecosystems
Jul 21 2022
Women of Color Entrepreneurship Ecosystems
“It takes a village to raise an entrepreneur,” shares Dr. Dell Gines, certified economic developer who works for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.  In today’s episode, host D-Rich sits down with guests Dr. Dell Gines and college professor Dr. Tracy H. Dunn to discuss entrepreneurship ecosystems and how they impact women of color and Black communities as a whole.    Dr. Tracy is a professor at Benedict College, an HBCU that was first created to educate newly freed Black males. She now works with the college to implement entrepreneurial learning opportunities for the students which include both business and small retail incubators for students to practice launching their own businesses while receiving college credit. It is important to keep HBCU’s alive and thriving, because they are statistically responsible for the majority of Black leaders across a wide array of jobs from engineers and lawyers to being elected into political positions. Dr. Dell explains that to build a functioning entrepreneurship ecosystem, communities need to come together rather than focusing on individualism. Historically, the best successes for Black people in America have occurred within the context of community because it takes a village to counteract the exploitative systems that were put in place to keep Black people from gaining and holding power. By ensuring that Black entrepreneurs, and particularly Black women entrepreneurs, are able to access the resources they need to be successful, there will be more businesses that hire Black people and that are sensitive to the needs within the local community.    Join Dr. Tracy H. Dunn, Dr. Dell Gines, and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about entrepreneurship ecosystems, the challenges facing women of color in the context of entrepreneurship, and the importance of helping HBCUs thrive.    Quotes • “In order for HBCUs to survive, what I think is critical is that we remain relevant.” (17:34-17:40 | Dr. Tracy) • “Any way that you can think of to contribute to your local HBCU, or your HBCU of choice, I would encourage you to do so. Think about if you have a master's degree, or PhD, think about being an adjunct to another HBCU, or giving back in some way.” (21:01-21:23 | Dr. Tracy) • “It's not easy being a woman leader, but if you can find people who inspire you and who have lessons from their own walk in leadership, that is very, very helpful.” (30:04-30:20 | Dr. Tracy) • “Almost one in four HBCUs are responsible for 40% of all Black engineers, 40% of all members of Congress, 50% of Black lawyers and 80% of Black judges.” (32:06-32:23 | Dr. Tracy)  • “It takes a village to raise an entrepreneur.” (36:22-36:24 | Dr. Dell) • “Bourgeois black people have to understand, you are still black, right? In that you can't escape that essential centeredness of who you are as an individual, based upon the way America sees you. Now, you can see yourself differently, of course, in people, you can see people differently in your circle. But at the end of the day, no matter how we come to this, this is how we are perceived externally. And the forces of the United States have been set up against us, and are set up to exploit us from the beginning.” (42:41-43:08 | Dr. Dell) • “One of the ways you exclude masses of people out of the process of generating wealth is through the systems, particularly the education system, that really trains us to be employees and not owners.” (49:08-49:19 | Dr. Dell) • “Black women in particular, have been always been very innovative within our community, and going back to slavery, of trying to navigate hostile environments through creativity, in the creation of opportunity.” (1:11:26-1:11:37 | Dr. Dell)   Links Connect with Dr. Tracy H. Dunn, Ph.D.:     Connect withDr. Dell Gines, Ph.D.:     Guides: with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us  A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio recordings “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
Family Conflict & Generational Trauma
Jul 20 2022
Family Conflict & Generational Trauma
“Family trauma really just extends from trauma that one person experiences and If it's not resolved, it just keeps going,” shares Jamesha Williams, licensed marriage and family therapist. In today’s episode7 host D-Rich sits down with guests Jamesha Williams and Christian psychologist Dr. Juanita Britt McDonald to talk about the impacts of family conflict and generational trauma on the Black community.    Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, or TEI, is essentially an imprint in our DNA from our parents and grandparents and so on. Unresolved traumatic experiences from our direct ancestors are embedded into our own DNA and have impacts on our behaviors, personality, and mental health. In the Black community especially, there is a lot of stigma surrounding mental health, frequently accompanied by a lack of healthy communication regarding trauma. People may not realize that when dealing with anxiety, shame, alcoholism, or any other host of challenges, their behaviors can often be traced back to a parent or grandparent's experiences. When we break the chain by getting support, whether it be through talking it out with a therapist or a close friend or even getting medication and we commit to resolving our own trauma, we can stop that domino effect of generational trauma in its tracks. By establishing healthy boundaries and clear channels of communication, we can set our kids up for successful future relationships and lessen the burden of TEI.    Join Jamesha Williams, Dr. Juanita Britt McDonald and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about transgenerational epigenetic inheritance and how trauma impacts the community as a whole rather than just being an individual issue.    Quotes • “When you and I began to look at stigma in the Black community, guess what? We don't do that. And excuse my ebonix but we don't do that. We don't need therapists. We don't have those personal issues. And you're crazy if you need a therapist. That's the biggest overall. And that's why you're looking at a form of learned behavior that we don't need that type of support and help.” (4:45-5:15 | Dr. Juanita) • “It is really a taboo to air your dirty laundry. And so a lot of people just suffer in silence because of it.” (5:32-5:40 | Jamesha) Social Media • “When Miss Jamesha’s grandmother was carrying her mother, at five months old, she was also carrying Miss Jamesha.” (9:02-9:12 | Dr. Juanita) • “Family trauma really just extends from trauma that one person experiences and how it really affects our system. So the people who are around us, it affects our community. And again, if it's not resolved, it just keeps going.” (11:51-12:06 | Jamesha) • “There was never ever any form of communication. There was never ever a form of education. There's a lot of things that we never did receive.” (27:21-27:28 | Dr. Juanita) • “It is okay to say no. It is okay to put yourself first. It's okay to be selfish. Sometimes if you have kids, I understand you have to walk a fine line, but teaching them boundaries will then help them when they're in a difficult situation and feeling uncomfortable.” (44:13-44:33 | Jamesha)   Links Connect with Jamesha Williams:     Connect with Dr. Juanita Britt McDonald: with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us  A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio recordings “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
“Venture Capital & Angel Investing” -  Bridging the Funding Gap with Brooke Daniels
May 26 2022
“Venture Capital & Angel Investing” - Bridging the Funding Gap with Brooke Daniels
“When it comes to representation, VC entrepreneurship is woefully behind,” shares Brooke Daniels, founder of Ready, Aim, Launch. In today’s episode host D-Rich sits down with Brooke to talk about bridging the funding gap for Black entrepreneurs and the differences between venture capital and angel investing. Next, D-Rich and Brooke are joined by entrepreneurs Aireka Harvell, CEO of NoDat Place, and Gene Norman of Water Watch LLC to critique their business pitches.    Many Black entrepreneurs feel that before they start a business, they need to have a specific amount of money, but that is not the case. Brooke explains that bigger companies rely on venture capital and angel investors for funding rather than investing their own cash. Venture capital offers the opportunity for very high growth in exchange for equity in the company. Angel investors are accredited investors that face even larger risks than venture capitalists because they are investing individually rather than through a fund. It is one of the riskiest asset classes, but does allow for greater control over your investments and the potential for even higher reward.    Join Brooke Daniels, Aireka Harvell, Gene Norman, and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about venture capital and angel investing. Learn about the funding gap facing Black entrepreneurs and how to benefit from learning how to invest in different asset classes.    Quotes  • “One of the biggest hurdles I see in our community is that we feel like it has to be our personal cash that starts a business, which is just not true. That's not how the big companies do it.” (11:52-12:03 | Brooke) • “The trade off for venture capital money is that because you've been able to grow so fast with these cash infusions, you've created a bigger business where now you maybe only have five or 10% left. But that piece is still going to be bigger than the piece you may have had if you had done the funding yourself.” (13:21-13:37 | Brooke) • “VC entrepreneurship, when it comes to representation, is woefully behind.” (16:18-16:22 | Brooke) • “When I was on TV, I was just forecasting how you're gonna get two inches of rain. Once it fell, I didn't care what happened to it. But there's a whole industry of people who are very concerned about what happens to that water. And so I listened to my customers, I made adjustments to our product to make it more valuable and useful to them. And that has helped us grow.” (56:52-57:12 | Gene) • “After COVID, what we realize is it's easier to connect with investors through zoom.” (1:05:53-1:05:58 | Aireka) Links   Connect with Brooke Daniels, Founder of Ready, Aim, Launch and Business Coach & Advisor - VIP Coaching - Ready Aim Launch -   Gene Norman, Water Watch, LLC   Aireka Harvell, CEO NoDat Place   Angel Investor Resources for Black Women, and People of Color Equity Crowdfunding Getting Started as an Angel Investor - Cap Table Coalition - WeFunder Crowdfunding - Net Capital Crowdfunding - Investing: The Gust Guide to Making Money and Having Fun Investing in Startups - with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us  A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio recordings “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
“Not Paved for Us” - Black Educators and Public School Reform in Philadelphia with Dr. Camika Royal
May 19 2022
“Not Paved for Us” - Black Educators and Public School Reform in Philadelphia with Dr. Camika Royal
“I think it's very important to have first person accounts, and if it can't be a first person account, a witness account,” shares Dr. Camika Royal, professor with 23 years of education experience and Author of Not Paved for Us. In today’s episode host D-Rich sits down with guests Dr. Camika Royal and Historian and Educator Peter J. Boykin to talk about public school reform in Philadelphia and the challenges facing Black educators now and throughout history.    While Philadelphia may be viewed as a very liberal northern city, its history is much darker and full of racist undertones. When teachers were first hired by the district, they were separated into two lists based on race. After receiving backlash, the district merged the lists, but still found ways to treat Black educators as inferior. The Voluntary Transfer Program was put in place to send Black educators to different schools in an effort to “desegregate” the faculty, rather than making white educators change schools. Protests by Black students demanding more Black educators and African American history courses were historically met with police violence. Similar attempts to keep Black educators down and keep African American history out of schools have been widespread across the country, even in cities where the majority of the school districts are home to primarily African American students.    Join Dr. Camika Royal, Peter J. Boykin, and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about the history of public school reform in Philadelphia, the challenges facing Black educators and students, and the similarities between the education system in Philadelphia and southern cities like Detroit.    Quotes • “In Philadelphia, they're starting to make these connections. It’s not just the UK having all of this power and colonizing all these people. We have our own version here in the US and in Philadelphia as well.” (10:14-10:29 | Dr. Royal) • “In the late ‘70s, some Black educators were like, wait a minute, we are Black people teaching at a majority Black school. Why should we have to leave? We work well with each other. We're invested in these children. Why are we responsible for desegregating this school district?” (14:48-15:02 | Dr. Royal) • “People need to look in their own communities to see what stories need to be told so that there will be testimonies of our work and how we fought back against racism, against white supremacy, against anglo-normativity, against the patriarchy, against all these forms of oppression that continue to try to kill us.” (28:45-29:08 | Dr. Royal) • “People say that Brown v. Board of Education was a southern thing, but it really encompasses the whole United States.” (35:50-35:57 | Peter J. Boykin) • “Even with a majority African American School District, there's still a lot of inequity.” (36:35-36:39 | Peter J. Boykin)   Links More Information about Dr. Royal - Paved For Us: Black Educators and Public School Reform in Philadelphia -  day Philadelphia bombed its own people: with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio recordings “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
”Hot Shot Trucking” with De Shola Spencer and Guests
May 5 2022
”Hot Shot Trucking” with De Shola Spencer and Guests
“Trucking is where it's at right now,” shares De Shola Spencer, teacher and serial entrepreneur with 17 years of experience. In today’s episode host D-Rich sits down with guest De Shola Spencer and others to talk about the money-making opportunities in Hot Shot Trucking.   When people think about trucking, they usually think of the big 18 wheelers and box trucks. Many people do not realize that they can be a trucker without a CDL license. There are big opportunities for earning money in trucking, especially if you do the proper research first. De Shola works as a dispatcher that helps truckers to maximize their loads and use the best routes. Even if you just have a basic pick up truck and a small trailer, it is possible to make good money in the industry.    Join De Shola Spencer and host D-Rich on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about Hot Shot Trucking, the opportunities available in the trucking industry, and what it takes to maximize your money as a trucker.    Quotes • “If you have a niche, and then you see the opportunity there, you just have to go for it. I do believe in being patient. But I also feel that if there is an opportunity, you need to make it happen because someone else is going to make it happen otherwise.” (49:42-49:59) • “Every time someone thinks about trucking, they automatically think about 18-wheelers, CDL drivers, box truck drivers. They don't think about the fact that someone who doesn’t have a CDL can also benefit from being in this industry.” (52:32-52:47) • “Factoring for truckers allows them to get paid within 24 hours. Which is a big thing especially when you have to pay for things like gas, hotels, and all the other things associated with being a trucker.” (57:29-57:41) • “Trucking is where it's at right now. Some things that you need to know when you're booking loads for a person, is how to maximize that trailer. If you get a load that's five feet, and it's only 1000 pounds, and you can carry 7400 pounds, then we need to find more to go on that truck on that trailer because you're trying to maximize all of your loads. You have to be able to route and you have to have critical thinking skills.” (1:10:59-1:11:31)  Links Connect with episode guests: De Shola Spencer, Hot Shot Trucking - Freeman, The Envoy Magazine - Butler, Lady Vwb Nature - Daryl Green, Nu Leadership Revolution Blog - with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us  A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio recording “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
Hot Topics in Education: “K-12 Challenges” & ”PH.D. to Entrepreneur”
May 2 2022
Hot Topics in Education: “K-12 Challenges” & ”PH.D. to Entrepreneur”
“I really do believe that more students reading is a game-changer,” shares Eno Richardson, education consultant, and educator with over a decade of experience. Both of today’s guest speakers are driven by a desire to create positive change in the world of education. In the first part of the episode, host DJ-Rich is joined by Eno Richardson to discuss the challenges grade school students and teachers face, particularly in a post-pandemic world. Then you will want to stick around for a conversation with Dr. Chantel Nicolas, Ph.D. Chemist and Creator of Nerd Startup Incubator, about entrepreneurial opportunities for Ph.D. graduates.    The gap in opportunity for Black and Brown kids is a real issue in academics and has only increased during the pandemic. It is commonly known that in public and urban schools, there are distinct barriers to access to remote learning. In addition, the major shortage of teachers following the pandemic has only further increased learning loss. Eno stresses that reading could be the key to bridging the gap between Black and Brown students to their white peers. Reading not only helps students to understand the world around them but also helps students gain valuable critical thinking skills they will need later in life.   If you have an interest in academics, you may be interested to learn about how you can turn your Ph.D. into an opportunity to start your own business. In their studies, Ph.D. students have to learn how to sell themselves and their ideas when writing and defending their dissertation. They have experience creating articles for publication while also becoming an expert in their niche fields. Rather than using a Ph.D. to work a typical 9 to 5 job, students are equipped with the skills to become excellent entrepreneurs.   Join Eno Richardson and Dr. Chantel Nicolas on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow for a double feature about trending topics in education. Learn more about the challenges facing K-12 Black and Brown students, the importance of reading, and how you can leverage your Ph.D. experience to launch the business of your dreams.  Quotes  • “Research shows that when students have teachers who look like them, especially Black and Brown kids, they learn more.” (10:46-10:53 | Eno) • “We know for many of our students, particularly in our public schools and urban schools, experienced barriers to remote learning. So when we refer to learning loss, it is the amount of information, standards, curriculum, and experiences that students did not get to finish because of the pandemic.” (27:33-28:02 | Eno) • “I believe that the more students reading is just a game-changer.” (30:19-30:24 | Eno) • “The opportunity gap is real. We know that there are major disparities created by the system, the nation we live in, that starts our Black and Brown kids in a different playing field than their white peers. And by reading more frequently, our students can actually achieve and grow at a level equal or higher to these peers is really astounding to me. So that's why I consider it the great equalizer.” (31:44-32:10 | Eno)  • “You have the trifecta, you have a salesperson, someone who actually creates content, who could do email marketing, podcasting, filming, or whatever. And then on top of that, they have a niche market. So I just think that we develop those skills. And in addition to project management, and all those other awesome skill sets that we develop, as nerds in the academics.” (1:00:39-1:01:07 | Dr. Nicolas)   Links Connect with Eno Richardson and Dr. Chantel Nicolas: Eno Richardson Consulting: Startup Incubator with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us  A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio recordings “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
“Disrupting Wealth Disparity” - Closing Black Family Wealth Gap
Apr 14 2022
“Disrupting Wealth Disparity” - Closing Black Family Wealth Gap
“To me, developing a positive relationship with money means overcoming financial trauma,” explains Yolanda Mukombe, MBA of YGM Consulting. In today’s episode, host D-Rich, Yolanda, and Steve Canty of Canty Insurance, sit down to talk about wealth disparity and how to close to Black family wealth gap.    Black families have long been left out of financial institutions such as banking and home ownership. Throughout history, they haven’t been able to acquire the same equity as white families and have since been left to catch up. According to the panel, learning how to make your money work for you can be the difference between a traumatic financial situation and security. While learning how to navigate financial systems such as loans, life insurance, and mortgages can be overwhelming, it is a crucial step towards building generational wealth and closing the racial wealth gap.    Join Yolanda Mukombe and Steve Canty on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow as they shed light on the issues surrounding wealth disparity in Black communities. Learn more about the importance of building equity, homeownership, and life insurance so you can begin to make your money work for you.  Quotes • “It's easy for me to tell other people how to do it. But my God, when I was in the middle of it, it felt so difficult. And having that experience really opened my eyes to having compassion to help people navigate through financially traumatic situations.” (5:45-6:03 | Yolanda) • “I try to help people rebound from financially traumatic situations, develop a plan, and then start to plan in preparation for kids. Even if nothing chaotic never happens, it is so much better to have a plan in place. Just like you have life insurance, or insurance on your cell phone, or your car,  you need to have insurance on your financial security so that you can pivot if something does happen.” (7:40-8:04 | Yolanda)  • “Developing a positive relationship with money, means to overcome financial trauma. Instead of your money telling you what to do, you are in control of your money.” (10:33-10:47 | Yolanda) • “We’ve been locked out of a lot of the financial vehicles that allow us to build equity that we can transfer to future generations.” (22:47-22:57 | Steve) • “Life insurance is critical. And people really need to not be shy or be embarrassed about what they don't know. If you can let your hair down, you can learn something new” (30:13-30:31 | Steve)   Links Connect with Yolanda Mukombe, MBA:: Schedule a FREE Consultation with Yolanda at: a positive relationship with money with Yolanda at:   Connect with Steve Canty: Website: - with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us  A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio recording “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.   Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
The Strong “Silent” Black Woman – Myth? Superpower? Burden? with Dr. Seanna Leath and Dr. Martinque Jones
Apr 7 2022
The Strong “Silent” Black Woman – Myth? Superpower? Burden? with Dr. Seanna Leath and Dr. Martinque Jones
“This tension that we’re talking about has direct implications for Black women’s mental and physical health that bleed into the rest of our community,” explains Dr. Martinque Jones. In today’s episode, host D-Rich, Dr. Seanna Leath and Dr. Martinque Jones sit down to examine the idea of the strong “silent” black woman.    The idea of the strong Black woman has both deep roots and a direct impact on the Black community as a whole. Though modern Black women have reclaimed the idea of the “strong black woman” as a way to show they are strong community leaders, overall there are several negative implications surrounding this stereotype. It is a double-edged sword because while it can serve a great purpose, it can also worsen mental and physical health outcomes for Black women. Dr. Jones and Dr. Leath discuss the real issues that lie within our systems, and how they are designed to force Black women to appear strong, even though they may be struggling. To improve the overall health of Black women, it is necessary that we begin to redefine the meaning of the word strength.    Join Dr. Seanna Leath and Dr. Martinque Jones on this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow as they de-bunk the myth of the strong Black woman. Learn more about the orginiation of this idea and how the real-life implications are a cause for everyone to reexamine the way they perceive Black women as a whole.  Quotes • “Us modern Black women have kind of reappropriated this idea of the strong Black woman. It’s kind of considered a badge of honor for many of us.” (8:03-8:12 | Dr. Jones) • “Sometimes we are saying that we need help, or this isn’t working, or we need something else, and maybe folks aren’t able to lighten that load or lighten the burden.” (9:56-10:05 | Dr. Leath) • “This tension that we’re talking about has direct implications for Black women’s mental and physical health and that bleeds out into the rest of our community.” (16:44-16:52 | Dr. Jones) • “With the strong Black women in our lives, are we asking if they need help? Are we not waiting for them to tell us that they need help, but instead seeing all the things they are doing and being like you know what here’s how I can plug in. Here’s what I can do.” (17:50-18:01 | Dr. Leath) • “Endorsing or embodying the strong Black woman ideal leads to a wide variety of negative consequences for Black women. (21:40-21:47 | Dr. Jones)  • “Perhaps being strong is saying I need rest. Perhaps being strong for a Black woman is saying I need help. Maybe being strong is unplugging for a day and tapping into your wellness.” (23:30-23:40 | Dr. Leath)   Famous Quotes on the strength of Black women:   • “But what of Black women? I most sincerely doubt if any other race of women could have brought its finest up through such a devilish fire.” W.E.B. DuBois  • “I’m convinced that Black women possess a special indestructible strength that allows us to not only get down, but to get up, to get through, and to get over.” Janet Jackson  • “Usually when people talk about the strength of Black women, they ignore the reality that to be strong in the face of oppression is not the same as overcoming oppression, that endurance is not to be confused with transformation.” Bell hooks  • “You may shoot me with your words You may cut me with your eyes You may kill me with your hatefulness But still, like air, I rise.” Maya Angelou, from “Still I Rise”  • “Black women could hardly strive for weakness. They had to become strong, for their families and their communities needed their strength to survive. Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, Ida B. Wells, and Rosa Parks are not exceptional Black women as much as they are epitomes of Black womanhood.” Angela Davis   Links   Connect with Dr. Seanna Leath and Dr. Martinque Jones:   Resources The Strong “Silent” Black Woman /   Therapy for Black Girls  -   Dr. Joy Harden Bradford  -   12 Resources for Black Women Seeking Mental Health Support -   Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls: 100 Real-Life Tales of Black Girl Magic -   Too Heavy a Yoke: Black Women and the Burden of Strength  - Seanna Leath Twitter Handle - @SeannaLeathPhD Lab Page  Link - FHIRe Lab - Martinque  Jones Links Twitter Handle: @Dr_MartiJ Instagram Handle: @mkjphd Research Lab: @BWell_Lab   Lab Page Link: BWell Lab | Department of Psychology   SBW Wellness Collaborative  Webpage Link: Strong Black Women (  About Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - PodShow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us  A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio experience “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
Marketing Strategy for Nonprofits w/ Bilen Mesfin Packwood
Mar 31 2022
Marketing Strategy for Nonprofits w/ Bilen Mesfin Packwood
“Some folks get excited about musicians or movie stars, I get excited about folks who have ideas for how to make our world better,” says Bilen Mesfin Packwood, CEO, and Founder of Change Consulting. In today’s episode, host D-Rich and Bilen sit down for an in-depth discussion about marketing strategies for nonprofit organizations.    Bilen was initially inspired to start Change Consulting because she wanted to support changemakers in her community. While starting a nonprofit requires taking more risks than a for-profit company, it has the potential to help all members of the community. According to Bilen, the key to a successful nonprofit is hidden in the messaging, so you must find a creative way to reach your intended audience. Through her work, Bilen is dedicated to helping other nonprofits improve their communication strategies so they can make a difference on important issues such as racial injustice, voting rights, and financial equity.    Tune into this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about the fundamentals of running a nonprofit, the importance of communication, and how you can participate in nonprofits to make a difference in your community.    Quotes • “No assholes. No toxic culture. No individual ascendency at the cost of relationships. No trying to have high egos or a lot of drama. I really believe in low ego, high impact.” (12:47-13:11) • “I’m learning and growing through this process and so I want to be just as transparent about that.” (16:10-16:15) • “I really do believe in progress over perfection.” (16:58-17:01) • “I started Change Consulting because I really believe that change makers are superheroes. Other folks get excited about musicians or movie stars, I get excited about folks who really have ideas for how to make our world better.” (21:34-21:45)  • “I think we are seeing both the issues and the solutions play out on a bigger stage than we ever have before. Hopefully that is all leading to real change and real transformation.” (30:37-30:47) • “Take any issue and there is probably a change-maker in your community working on it right now so figuring out how to support these folks is super important.”(34:07-34:15)   Links Connect with Bilen Mesfin Packwood:   Website - - - with Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   Enjoyed this episode?  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us  A Coffee!  Join The Show Experience our live studio experience “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
“38 Countries” & “Art Caretaking” a Travel & Art Double Feature
Mar 24 2022
“38 Countries” & “Art Caretaking” a Travel & Art Double Feature
In today’s episode, host D-Rich is joined in conversation with two special guests Dr. Trina A. Lynch-Jackon and Stephanie James to discuss how they share and honor culture through art and travel.   Growing up, Dr. Trina A. Lynch-Jackson had always admired her uncle. For much of her life, Dr. Trina looked forward to the visits she would have with her uncle where he would explain his experiences about culture through pieces of artwork. After he passed away, Dr. Trina has made it her life's mission to respect and honor his legacy by continuing to share his work around the world.    For Stephanie, the best way to learn about the world is by seeing it. After taking her first couple trips outside of the US, Stephanie knew she needed to find a way to devote her life to traveling full time. Throughout her many years of traveling, Stephanie has always appreciated the people she has met along the way the most. To better honor her experiences and shed light on black cultures around the world, Stephanie writes and shares poetry about how to embrace the beauty in our differences.    Tune into this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow to learn more about how traveling and preserving art are the key to celebrating culture and preserving family legacy.    Quotes • “One of the most important things is celebrating the arts because the arts during these difficult times suffered. Many of us were not able to support the arts, Broadway shut down, movie theaters shut down. But I continue to celebrate and praise the arts, especially for my people of color.” (04:13-04:39 | Dr. Trina A Lynch-Jackson) • “I would travel to see my uncle and I would have deep conversations with him as well and he knew that I would honor and respect all the work that he has done.” (10:41-10:54 | Dr. Trina A. Lynch-Jackson) • “I'm also an entrepreneur so I believe in generating money because I want to be able to continue to share his story.” (12:36-12:46 | Dr. Trina A. Lynch-Jackson) • “I want my listening audience to understand how important it is to prepare, and to cherish and to honor your family.” (17:45-17:54 | Dr. Trina A. Lynch-Jackson)  • “Everything about traveling is meeting different people around the world and gaining a different perspective. I think travel is the best life coach that you can have.” (25:36-25:46 | Stephanie James) • “I think what I love so much about travel is the richness in our differences, and how much our differences can actually be similarities as well.” (26:39-26:48 | Stephanie James) • “The concept of the show Changing Tourism is to highlight the black indigenous people of color in different countries around the world and give them a platform to tell stories that would otherwise remain untold.” (31:12-31:35 | Stephanie James)   Links   Stephanie James, Just a Vessel Poetry - Trina A. Lynch-Jackson - Chislom, Divas Prerogative - the Southern Soul Live Stream - Podshow   Witty, thought-provoking, and uplifting, Southern Soul Livestream - Podshow is the program that you’ll invite friends over to watch every week, where you’ll learn about fascinating speakers and get to share in their exciting experiences. Tune in each Thursday at 8 pm eastern to connect with guests from across the generations and to laugh with our "cast of characters," hosts who are as charming as they are talented!   • Enjoyed this episode?        •  Support our hard work and exploratory journalism, Buy us  A Coffee!  • Join The Show        • Experience our live studio recordings “It’s a Whole Vibe!” Click here to register.     Connect with us • Website: www.SoulLiveStream.com • Facebook: Instagram: Twitter:
ADHD and The Challenges for Black Kids with Dr. Brandi Bolling
Mar 17 2022
ADHD and The Challenges for Black Kids with Dr. Brandi Bolling
“Research suggests that over average, white teachers tend to label black students as lazy more often than their white peers. In turn, black kids are labeled more hyperactive, more defiant, and ultimately, more likely to have ADHD.” While the topic of ADHD is a tricky subject, it is clear that it needs to be addressed. In today’s episode, host DJ D-Rich sits down with Dr. Brandi Bolling, child psychiatrist for an in-depth discussion about ADHD and how it affects black kids.  According to Dr. Bolling, 33% of all children with ADHD will drop out of high school and less than 5% will complete college. It is more important than ever that we are properly diagnosing and treating our children. While raising your child, Dr. Bolling suggests paying attention to early warning signs like procrastination, mood swings, or being easily distracted. The earlier we can get treatment for these children, the more likely they are to succeed.  Tune into this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream to learn more about what the three types of ADHD are, how to recognize the symptoms, and how you can help your child with ADHD find success both in the classroom and in life.    Quotes • “If you were to look at a child with ADHD and then look at the parents, about 41% of dads and 31% of moms are going to have ADHD as well.” (05:28-05:38) • “It is absolutely important to recognize the signs and then to get treatment.” (08:18-08:24) • “Every single thing we do requires us to focus and if you're not able to do that, you may be successful but not reach your full potential.” (12:02-12:11) • “Black children, especially black boys, are much more likely to be diagnosed with a disruptive behavior disorder instead of ADHD.” (14:04-14:14) • “The goal of treating ADHD is to make it so that that child doesn't look any different from anyone else. But it's hard to get people to understand that the treatment really normalizes them.” (27:01-27:17) • “What has been consistently shown to be effective in treating ADHD is medication.” (31:15-31:21)   Links Connect with Dr. Brandi Bolling: • To receive a FREE video with 7 Tips for Success In the Classroom: Dr Brandi is Live on Fridays at Noon Central: To purchase, SHINE: Understanding ADHD So Your Child Can Be A Star!: www.ShineADHDBook.shop • To learn more about Dr Brandi and her services: www.DrBrandiB.com Connect with Southern Soul Live Stream: • Want to listen to our next episode live? Click here to register. • Website: www.SoulLiveStream.com • Facebook: Instagram:
The State of Justice in 2022 with Anissa Patton, Esq., Jacqueline Lopardo, Esq., Kevin Jones, Esq., and Keli Webb, Esq.
Mar 14 2022
The State of Justice in 2022 with Anissa Patton, Esq., Jacqueline Lopardo, Esq., Kevin Jones, Esq., and Keli Webb, Esq.
“Justice is a system that is supposed to protect all people, but historically has not served all citizens very well,” says host DJ D-Rich. Through slavery, segregation, and mass incarceration, African Americans have negatively been impacted by the justice system. In today’s episode, host DJ D-Rich sits down with a panel of lawyers for an in-depth discussion about the state of justice in 2022.  While the concept of justice is good, it is flawed in its execution. According to the panelists, one of the main issues with the justice system is underrepresentation. When the system is designed for and run by a specific group of people, it is easy to neglect others. To better serve all of our citizens, we must encourage Black Americans to take part by doing things such as voting, running for office, and participating in jury duty. At the end of the day, justice cannot be served until it is equitable for ALL.  Tune into this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream to learn more about the definition of justice, examples of systemic racial disparities, and ways we can reevaluate how we approach justice so we can build a system that is fair for all.  Quotes • “Greater justice to me means never being satisfied with the status quo within our justice system.” (16:55-17:03 | Kevin Jones) • “To put it simply, justice is doing the right thing and treating people the right way.” (17:23-17:32 Kevin Jones) • “To me, justice is family autonomy and unification by the community offering services and support so that a family can provide a nurturing and loving environment for children.” (19:46-20:04 | Anissa Patton)  • “Justice needs to be not just an outcome. It needs to be something that we do preemptively. There needs to be pre-emptive action plans that get us in a state of justice before we need to actually fight for justice.” (22:05-22:20 Jacqueline Lopardo) • “If we are basing the concept of who deserves what based on our own moral correctness, then the question becomes who decides what is just?” (26:15-26:27 | Keli Webb) • “We're basing the entire justice system upon a small percentage of people who have what they feel is right.” (27:22-27:29 | Keli Webb) • “We need more people of color and we need more representation from our communities in the justice spaces so that we determine who the judges are.” (48:58-49:10  | Jacqueline Lopardo) • “Consistently having people of color who are on trial for their lives being judged by a people that do not look like them, do not come from where they come from, and do not understand their experience is how we have overwhelming sentencing and overpopulation in the prisons.” (53:23-53:43 | Keli Webb)   Links Attorney Kevin Jones - Jacqueline Lapardo - Keli Webb - Anissa Patton -   Connect with Southern Soul Live Stream: Want to listen to our next episode live? Click here to register.Website: www.SoulLiveStream.comFacebook:
Getting Started in Stocks & Overcoming the Challenges of Legacy Planning
Mar 4 2022
Getting Started in Stocks & Overcoming the Challenges of Legacy Planning
When it comes to finances and estate planning, many people feel behind. While these can be daunting topics of discussion, it is important, no matter your age or what you own, to have a plan in place. In today’s episode, host D–Rich is joined in conversation with Latavia Alexander and Bahiyah Shabazz for an in-depth conversation about financial building and legacy planning.  According to the guests, the first step towards anything is education. The more knowledge you have, the better decisions you can make for yourself and your loved ones. Rather than believing everything you see online, it is important to seek counsel from a professional. Despite popular belief, estate planning and investing is for everyone. No matter who you are, you have something worth saving, and having a plan in place can protect you and your family.  Tune into this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream to learn more about the importance of education, community, and the fundamentals of estate planning and investing so you can increase your knowledge to build and protect your legacy for generations to come.    Quotes • “I like to refer to the Advanced Medical Directive and the Power of Attorney as more of life documents because they apply while we're still living.” (10:07-10:14 | Latavia Alexander) • “A lot of people don't know that you can add a payable on death to your bank account so when you pass away, the money is essentially released to your beneficiary.” (15:10-15:23 | Latavia Alexander) • “What we do now can lighten the load later.” (16:15-16:18 | Latavia Alexander) • “My hope is that people realize legacy planning is something that we do need to do and that we can do because we have things that are worth saving.” (18:33-18:39 | Latavia Alexander) • “One of the reasons it's important to plan is because even if we don’t plan, the state has already created a plan for you. Every state has something called the intestate succession act and it essentially spells out who gets what in what percentages if you die without a will.” (20:19-20:34 | Latavia Alexander) • “Money is a tool to get to where we want.” (23:51-23:53 | Bahiyah Shabazz) • “One of our challenges as a community is that  we believe we must earn a lot of money in order to invest. We are not aware that we can invest as small as $1 $5 or $50.” (32:33-32:42 | Bahiyah Shabazz) • “I want to make sure that whoever is part of Brown Girls Do Invest understands their worth. And understand that all they have to do is change their mindset and create a budget that includes how much they're going to contribute towards their investments.” (36:34-36:52 | Bahiyah Shabazz) • “What a lot of investors do not realize is that you are the one that controls this market.” (38:11-38:17 | Bahiyah Shabazz) • “Make sure you're always learning and make sure you actually implement what you learn.” (40:17-40:21 | Bahiyah Shabazz)   Links Connect with Latavia Alexander, Esq.: • Website: Brown Girls Do Invest -  Women Building Wealth (2nd ed) - Decimalytics Financial Advisory-   Connect with Bahiyah Shabazz, MBA: • Website:  with Southern Soul Live Stream: • Want to listen to our next episode live? Click here to register. • Website: www.SoulLiveStream.com • Facebook: Instagram: Twitter:
Black Wall Street and “The True Story of Oklahoma Black Towns”
Feb 25 2022
Black Wall Street and “The True Story of Oklahoma Black Towns”
“Black history should not be a mystery,” says Dr. Trina Jackson. Even though Black Americans have played a crucial role in the development of our country, their accomplishments are purposefully left out of history. In today’s episode, DJ D-Rich is joined in conversation with a panel of expert historians to take a deep dive behind Historical Black Towns and their role in American history.  While Oklahoma used to be home to over 50 Historical Black Towns, only 13 remain today. As these important towns continue to decrease, more history is lost. Even though Black Wall Street was the original Wall Street, most American’s aren’t aware of its existence at all. To preserve Black History and culture, we must focus on spreading awareness, advocating for open educational resources, and economically developing the remaining Black towns.  Tune into this week’s episode of Southern Soul Live Stream for an in-depth conversation behind Historical Black Towns. Learn more about the real story behind Black Wall Street, ways we can restore culture in Black towns, and why we must continue to be truth-tellers that advocate for Black History so that one day our ancestors will be fairly honored for their contributions to American history.    Quotes • “Oklahoma was once home to over 50 Black towns. Now, barely 13 remain.” (02:09-02:18 | DJ D-Rich) • “The government and other individuals tried to economically choke those thriving Black towns.” (07:21-07:30 | Dr. Daryl Green) • “Black history should not be a mystery.” (15:25-15:27 | Dr. Trina Jackson)  • “Black Wall Street was the original Wall Street. But unfortunately, we have to assign color to all the amazing things that we have done.” (15:39-15:49 | Dr. Trina Jackson) • “It's very important for all of us to share our history because we are truth-tellers.” (16:13-16:18 | Dr. Trina Jackson)  • “I don't know why we had to wait 100 years, but in 2021, the United States actually recognized the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa massacre.” (17:04-17:14 | Dr. Trina Jackson) • “There are Black towns scattered all throughout the United States right underneath our noses. Towns that we don’t even know about.” (27:19-27:29 | DJ D-Rich) • “We have to tell our stories. We cannot sit back and wait for others to do something.” (1:08:13-1:08:17 | Sandra Taitt-Eaddy)    Links Connect with Dr. Daryl Green, Renowned Author/Lecturer, Engineer, Consultant: • Website:   Connect with Dr. Trina Jackson, Teacher, Author, Curator, Social Entrepreneur: • LinkedIn:   Connect with Beverly Kirk, M.Ed - Historian Quilter/Fiber Artist: • Facebook: with Sandra Taitt-Eaddy, MA President Baobab Genealogy Society, Inc.: • LinkedIn:   Connect with Peter Boykin, MA,  Instructor, Historian, Education Consultant: • LinkedIn:   Connect with Southern Soul Live Stream: • Want to listen to our next episode live? Click here to register. • Website: www.SoulLiveStream.com • Facebook: Instagram: Twitter: