The Telepsychiatrist

Dr. Jodi Midiri

A podcast designed to demystify and humanize the psychiatric experience read less
Health & FitnessHealth & Fitness

Episodes

Episode 15: Humanizing Trauma/PTSD, and Demystifying Art Therapy with Carrie Ishee
Jan 15 2024
Episode 15: Humanizing Trauma/PTSD, and Demystifying Art Therapy with Carrie Ishee
This episode features the heart-wrenching story of Carrie and her unimaginable experience of being prayed upon by one of the people in which she should have been able to trust the most – her therapist and psychiatrist. This stunning story goes to the heart of dysfunction in psychiatric practice and the gaps we need to close in ethical behavior. The group then discusses art therapy, imagery, and how art and creativity can be used as an antidote to trauma.  Carries guides Nam through a therapeutic visualization exercise.  ResourcesCarrie's websiteCarrie's book, Seduced Into Darkness: Transcending my Psychiatrists Sexual AbuseCarrie's book trailerPTSD CriteriaA. Exposure to actual or threatened death, serious injury, or sexual violence in one (or more) of the following ways:Directly experiencing the traumatic event(s).Witnessing, in person, the event(s) as it occurred to others.Learning that the traumatic event(s) occurred to a close family member or close friend. In cases of actual or threatened death of a family member or friend, the event(s) must have been violent or accidental.Experiencing repeated or extreme exposure to aversive details of the traumatic event(s) (e.g., first responders collecting human remains; police officers repeatedly exposed to details of child abuse)B. Presence of one (or more) of the following intrusion symptoms associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning after the traumatic event(s) occurred:Recurrent, involuntary, and intrusive distressing memories of the traumatic event(s).Recurrent distressing dreams in which the content and/or affect of the dream are related to the traumatic event(s).Dissociative reactions (e.g., flashbacks) in which the individual feels or acts as if the traumatic event(s) were recurring.Intense or prolonged psychological distress at exposure to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic event(s).Marked physiological reactions to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic event(s).C. Persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning after the traumatic event(s) occurred, as evidenced by one or both of the following:Avoidance of or efforts to avoid distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings about or closely associated with the traumatic event(s).Avoidance of or efforts to avoid external reminders (people, places, conversations, activities, objects, situations) that arouse distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings about or closely associated with the traumatic event(s).D. Negative alterations in cognitions and mood associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning or worsening after the traumatic event(s) occurred, as evidenced by two (or more) of the following:Inability to remember an important aspect of the traumatic event(s)Persistent and exaggerated negative beliefs or expectations about oneself, others, or the world (e.g., “I am bad,” “No one can be trusted,” “The world is completely dangerous,” “My whole nervous system is permanently ruined”).Persistent, distorted cognitions about the cause or consequences of the traumatic event(s) that lead the individual to blame himself/herself or others.Persistent negative emotional state (e.g., fear, horror, anger, guilt, or shame).Markedly diminished interest or participation in significant activities.Feelings of detachment or estrangement from others.Persistent inability to experience positive emotions (e.g., inability to experience happine