The BMJ Podcast

BMJ Group

The BMJ is an international peer reviewed medical journal and a fully “online first” publication. The BMJ’s vision is to be the world’s most influential and widely read medical journal. Our mission is to lead the debate on health and to engage, inform, and stimulate doctors, researchers, and other health professionals in ways that will improve outcomes for patients. We aim to help doctors to make better decisions. read less
Health & FitnessHealth & Fitness

Episodes

Heidi Larson on misinformation, the right exercise to reduce depression, and Breathtaking TV
Feb 16 2024
Heidi Larson on misinformation, the right exercise to reduce depression, and Breathtaking TV
Social media, and the rate at which the online world is changing, is worrying - especially the speed at which health disinformation can speed around the globe. We look to tech companies for a solution to the problems of their own making - but Heidi Larson, director of the Vaccine Confidence Project, and professor of anthropology, risk and decision science at LSHTM, joins us to explain why we should be cautious about focussing our attention there. Next on the podcast, research just published in The BMJ looks at the efficacy of exercise at controlling depressive symptoms - but helps finally answer the key question - which exercise works best. Lead author, Michael Noetel, senior lecturer in psychology at the University of Queensland, joins us to explain the research, and how well exercise stacks up against pharmacological treatments. Finally, while it’s tempting to try and put the pandemic behind us, its effects linger - and many healthcare staff are still dealing with their experience of that time. Rachel Clarke, a palliative care doctor in the UK, joins us to explain why she has felt the need to document the pandemic, first in a book and now in a new TV drama set to air in the UK next week.    06:15  Heidi Larson on vaccine confidence and social media 15:31 Exploring the effectiveness of exercise for depression 26:56 Rachel Clark on seeing her experiences reflected on screen   Reading list BMJ Collection: How are social media influencing vaccination Feature: Medical misinformation on social media—are the platforms equipped to be the judge? Research: Effect of exercise for depression
Christmas 2023 - performing medicine, and prescribing nature
Dec 22 2023
Christmas 2023 - performing medicine, and prescribing nature
In this festive edition of the BMJ podcast, we hear about what medicine can learn from music, when it comes to giving a convincing performance, and how we can grow an evidence base for nature prescribing.   Professors Roger Kneebone and Aaron William of the Centre for Performance Science raise the curtain on the performance of medicine, and we hear what your consultation technique could learn from a hairstylist.   Ruth Garside, Professor of Evidence Synthesis, Kerryn Husk, Associate Professor of Health Sciences and Edward Chapman from the Health and Environment Public Engagement Group then discuss 'nature prescribing', and wonder about how to balance maintaining the joy derived from nature and yet create an evidence base for the medicinal benefits associated with it.   Reading list Medicine: a performing art Nature prescribing     00:13 Introduction to the BMJ Podcast 00:36 Exploring the Themes of the Christmas Edition 01:38 The Intersection of Medicine and Performance 02:33 The Art and Science of Performance in Medicine 05:04 The Role of Performance in Music 06:29 The Similarities Between Medicine and Music 08:06 The Role of Experiential Learning in Performance 14:11 The Impact of Audience on Performance 19:04 The Benefits of Nature and Green Prescribing 24:52 The Challenges of Measuring the Impact of Nature Prescribing 30:37 The Community's Engagement with Nature Prescribing 33:01 Conclusion and Farewell
Oxytocin, clinical outcomes, and patient choice, in resource constrained settings
Dec 21 2023
Oxytocin, clinical outcomes, and patient choice, in resource constrained settings
There’s an inherent tension between creating quality standards that are very clinically focussed, and standards which are very patient centred - especially in settings where clinical outcomes can be compromised by basic lack of resources.  The use of oxytocin to prevent bleeding after birth is an example of this - WHO quality guidelines clearly measure and incentivise use of the drug, but in more wealthy healthcare systems, adherence patient preference is the key measure. How can we ensure that less wealthy healthcare systems are also patient centred?   Our guests for this discussion; Nana Twum-Danso, ​senior vice president, Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) Paul Dsane-Aidoo, health specialist, UNICEF Ghana Keith Cloete, head of department at Western Cape Government: Health Hosted by Emma Veitch, Collections editor for The BMJ   This podcast is part of The BMJ Quality of Care collection, in collaboration with the World Health Organization and the World Bank, which offers critical thinking on both the unfinished agenda and emerging priorities for improving quality of care in low- and middle-income countries. 00:00 Introduction to the podcast 00:48 Introduction of experts and their backgrounds 02:54 Challenges in healthcare systems: south africa's perspective 04:15 The importance of patient-centred care 04:56 The role of data in improving quality of care 06:11 Community engagement and feedback in healthcare 07:58 Tackling global disparities in healthcare 08:41 Balancing clinical outcomes and patient-centred care 10:58 Addressing inequities in healthcare 22:43 The role of governance in improving quality of care 32:56 Overcoming resource constraints in healthcare 36:22 The need for system redesign in healthcare 37:18 Adapting to changing times in healthcare
Social connection is essential for health; supporting adolescent health and wellbeing
Dec 14 2023
Social connection is essential for health; supporting adolescent health and wellbeing
In this specially curated three-part podcast series from The BMJ, we explore the importance of community and connection to foster adolescent wellbeing.   The discussion covers athe  wide array of issues young people face, with a particular focus on the unique challenges of adolescence from a social perspective. The episode unpacks the significance of having supportive relationships within families, schools, and communities and the influence of these relationships on the mental and behavioural health outcomes of adolescents.    It also explores the impact of digitalization on adolescent connection, with discussions on how to balance online interactions with offline engagements. Importantly, it highlights the need for further research into understanding digital and social media interactions and their influence on the health and wellbeing of adolescents in a rapidly evolving digital landscape.   Our guests: Ulises Ariel Vélez Gauna, Transmitiendo Diversidad Flavia Bustreo, Fondation Botnar  Richard Dzikunu, YIELD Hub Shelani Palihawadana, Young Experts Tech for Health. Joanna Lai, United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEFUnicef) Hosted by Adam Levy Supported by the Fondation Botnar and PMNCH, the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health. Read the full cCollection of articles showing the importance of investing in adolescent wellbeing. 00:04 Introduction to the podcast series 00:36 Understanding adolescence from a social perspective 01:00 The impact of community and connection on adolescents 01:07 Personal experiences: growing up as an LGBT+ teenager 01:38 The role of supportive relationships in adolescents' lives 02:05 The importance of connectedness in adolescence and beyond 03:27 Treating safe spaces for LGBT+ adolescents 05:23 The unique role of community during adolescence 07:02 The impact of political landscape on LGBT+ community 07:54 The importance of community and connectedness: expert opinions 08:56 The interconnection of social, health, and educational well-being 12:14 The role of digital technology in adolescents' lives 16:56 The importance of investing in adolescents' well-being 43:18 The role of schools in fostering connectedness 45:41 Conclusion: personal reflections on connectedness
Give children control; supporting adolescent health and wellbeing
Dec 14 2023
Give children control; supporting adolescent health and wellbeing
This is the second episode of a special three-part podcast series that delves into adolescent health and wellbeing, focusing on creating a positive trajectory of health from a young age.   The podcast explores physical and mental health issues affecting young people globally, particularly in sexual and reproductive health. We hear how young people are excluded from decisions about their own health, and how grassroots groups around the world are empowering them to take responsibility for their own wellbeing.   We also hear how young people are becoming leaders in social movements, from tackling structural racism to improving nutrition in schools, and how their unique perspectives are vital in making those changes.   Our guests: Natasha Salifyanji Kaoma, Copper Rose Zambia Alaa Murabit, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Donald Bundy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Anshu Banerjee, World Health Organisation Dev Sharma, Bite Back 2030 Hosted by Adam Levy Supported by the Fondation Botnar and PMNCH, the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health. Read the full cCollection of articles showing the importance of investing in adolescent wellbeing. 00:05 Introduction to adolescent health 01:00 Young womens’ menstrual health 02:11 Discussion on candid pride project 03:29 Importance of sexual and reproductive health 04:49 The role of young people in health advocacy 06:17 The epidemiology of early health and lifecourse 10:08 Impact of adolescent health on future generations 18:29 How young people become activists 28:51 Advocacy for women in Libya 28:54 Global forum for adolescents 40:15 Success stories  44:54 Conclusion and preview of next episode
It’s time for an educational revolution; supporting adolescent health and wellbeing
Dec 14 2023
It’s time for an educational revolution; supporting adolescent health and wellbeing
In the final episode of this three-part podcast series from The BMJ, we dive into the vital topic of education for adolescents and how it influences the course of life.    This podcast explores barriers, burdens and possibilities of change in the educational system to better support young people, and how the traditional system of schooling is failing to equip young people with the skills and knowledge to lead healthy lives.   We also hear how the value of informal education and its impact on subjects ranging from health to gender equality, and that learning isn’t limited to young people, and the intergenerational benefits of education and its role in shaping societal norms and individual health.    Our guests;   Maziko Matemvu, Uwale Joanna Herat, UNESCO Janani Vijayaraghavan, Plan Canada Atika Ajra Ayon, Plan International Stefan Germann, Fondation Botnar  Hosted by Adam Levy   Supported by the Fondation Botnar and PMNCH, the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health. Read the full cCollection of articles showing the importance of investing in adolescent wellbeing. 00:03 Introduction to the podcast 00:11 The importance of education for adolescents 03:26 The role of education in health and wellbeing 04:43 The impact of education on society 10:21 The power of peer education 11:15 The role of media in education 12:31 The importance of meaningful engagement in education 14:45 The impact of education on health 17:48 The challenges in access to education 26:25 The role of education in combating child marriage 36:37 The impact of climate change on education 44:53 The role of education in mental wellbeing 45:59 Conclusion of the podcast
Insulin without refrigeration and the complexities of consent
Dec 12 2023
Insulin without refrigeration and the complexities of consent
The December edition of the Talk Evidence podcast discusses the complexities of seeking consent from patients who are part of large data sets, and some new research to help patients living with diabetes in places without certain power supplies. First patient consent and data - in the UK,  two stories that have made the public worry about the use of their health data. Firstly the news that UK biobank, who hold a lot of genomic and health data, allowed research by an insurance company, and second that the NHS has entered a contract with Palentir to do analysis on NHS data. Natalie Banner, director of ethics at Genomics England has been thinking hard about putting patients at the centre of decision making about their data, and explains why she thinks a sole reliance on a consent model falls short. Next, uncertain power supplies, such as in conflict or disaster zones, means uncertain refrigeration. Hard enough for most people to survive, but if you need to keep your insulin cold, it can be lifethreatening. However a new cochrane review has found good news about the thermostability of insulin at room temperature. We ask Phillipa Boulle, MSF Intersectional NCD Working Group Leader and Cyrine Farhat,is  a global diabetes advocate based in Lebanon, how this will affect care for patients around the world.   Reading list Thermal stability and storage of human insulin   Outline   00:06 introduction and overview 00:24 the challenge of seeking consent in big data sets 01:34 understanding consent issues in large datasets 01:52 the role of participant panels in data accountability 02:44 the complexity of public attitudes towards data use 04:54 the importance of transparency and engagement in data use 05:48 the impact of external factors on public trust in data use 07:49 the ethical challenges of using health data 09:17 the limitations of consent in ethical discussions 09:23 the need for more conversation about group benefits, risks, and harms 10:41 the role of governance in ethical decision making 12:05 discussion on the interview with natalie banner 14:59 the challenge of managing chronic conditions in disaster zones 15:15 the impact of temperature and storage conditions on insulin 17:32 interview with Philippa Boulle from medecins sans frontieres 29:10 interview with Cyrine Farhat, a person living with diabetes in lebanon 36:18 discussion on the interviews and the challenges of diabetes management
Low carb and cancer screening
Nov 6 2023
Low carb and cancer screening
Each episode of Talk Evidence we take a dive into an issue or paper which is in the news, with a little help from some knowledgeable guests to help us to understand what it all means for clinical care, policy, or research.    In this episode: Helen Macdonald take a deep dive into cancer screening tests, prompted by a paper in JAMA which showed most have no effect on all cause mortality, and news that the NHS is evaluating a single test which screens for 50 common cancers - we ask Barry Kramer, former director of the Division of Cancer Prevention, at the U.S. National Cancer Institute to help explain how to hold those two pieces of knowledge. Juan Franco has been looking into diet and obesity, prompted by new research in The BMJ and a new Cochrane review, looking at the role of low glycemic index foods in weightloss - we ask Khadidja Chekima, nutritional researcher at Taylor’s University in Malaysia, to define low GI foods, and why it’s so hard to research their role in diet and weightloss    Reading list; JAMA research - Estimated Lifetime Gained With Cancer Screening Tests; A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials The BMJ news - Clinicians raise concerns over pilot of blood test for multiple cancers The BMJ research - Association between changes in carbohydrate intake and long term weight changes: prospective cohort study Cochrane review - Low glycaemic index or low glycaemic load diets for people with overweight or obesity