5 Things

USA TODAY / Wondery

The news you need to know to start your day. Five top news stories and why they matter. Seven days a week, with deep-dive Sunday episodes. Hosted by Taylor Wilson, Shannon Rae Green, James Brown and PJ Elliott. Discover more USA TODAY podcasts at usatoday.com/podcasts

Our Editor's Take

Staying up-to-date with what's going on in the world is essential. After all, an informed public is key to a healthy society. But the 5 Things podcast raises the question of whether we have too much information. With today's 24/7 news cycle, staying connected should be easier than ever. From dedicated news networks to podcasts, the flow of information never stops. Sometimes, though, the news of current events has the opposite effect. It can be overwhelming to sort through. Filtering through the information overload often leaves people wondering what's important. It's stressful and leads many to give up altogether.

5 Things cuts through the chaos and distills the day's most meaningful events into a quick and easy podcast. Listeners catch up on current events without distractions and unimportant details. 5 Things concentrates on the top five stories and why they matter. This quick-hitting news podcast is a fast and effective way to stay informed, but it doesn't sacrifice quality. The content is always on point, from breaking news to closer looks at enduring stories.

With a plethora of things to discuss, this podcast raises critical questions. Hosts James Brown, PJ Elliot, Shannon Rae Green, and Taylor Wilson share insights along the way. It's for the casual listener who wants to stay informed and current event fanatics alike. The topics are as intriguing as they are poignant. As a result, 5 Things also serves as a tremendous jumping-off point for further research. Think of it as an indispensable introduction to relevant subjects. It's quick, compelling, and invaluable.

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The many faces of the Latino vote
Nov 13 2022
The many faces of the Latino vote
Every election year Americans get chopped into pieces and clumped into voting blocks -Black voters, college educated voters, soccer moms and Nascar dads to name a few. There seems to be some truth to voting blocks; we are likely to share the share the same concerns as others who look like you, speak the same language, live near you and are in the same socioeconomic group.But according to today's guest, that is only surface deep.5 Things Sunday host James Brown sat down with USA TODAY White House reporter, Rebecca Morin to look at one of those supposed blocks - Latinos - and who they did and didn't vote for.Morin said what's important to Latinos varies across the nation, depending on where they live.For more on Rebecca's reporting on the Latino vote, read:Republicans made inroads with South Texas Latinos since last election. Now they're hoping for a red waveVenezuelans are a growing Latino group in the US. Can they recreate the Cuban American voter playbook?Democrats hoped Latinos would turn GOP states 'purple.' That may not be the case anymore.Follow James Brown and Rebecca Morin on Twitter.If you have a comment about the show or a question or topic you'd like us to discuss, send James Brown an email at jabrown@usatoday.com or podcasts@usatoday.com. You can also leave him a voicemail at 585-484-0339. We might have you on the show.Episode Transcript available hereAlso available at art19.com/shows/5-ThingsSee Privacy Policy at and California Privacy Notice at
Follow the money: Who is paying for political ads?
Nov 6 2022
Follow the money: Who is paying for political ads?
As Election Day quickly approaches, you've likely heard this election is the most important of our lifetime. But is it really? Or is it a ploy to persuade us that it is?When you watch, listen, scroll through social media or read an election flyer from your mailbox have you ever stopped and asked yourself, "who paid for this?"According to Research Director Michael Beckel from Issue One, a nonpartisan, nonprofit group that seeks to lessen the influence of money on politics, you should.5 Things Sunday host James Brown sat down with Beckel to talk about the money being funneled into campaigns both through Super PACS and through dark money and the problem with dark money funding different ads.According to Beckel, dark money groups don't have to disclose their donors and they "masquerade with very innocuous sounding names and they are not making it easy to identify if its a liberal or a conservative group."He said its an attempt to very coyly influence who you vote for.For more on following the money:Billionaires account for $1 of every $10 raised this election. These 11 anted up the most.Biden pushes bill targeting dark money in politicsWith Deadlocked Vote on Dark Money, DISCLOSE Act Fails to Clear SenateThe Congressional Fundraising Treadmill: Six Numbers to Know from the Latest Congressional Campaign Finance Filings12 political megadonors are responsible for $1 of every $13 in federal elections since Citizens United and 25% of all giving from the top 100 ZIP codes — a total of $3.4 billionSoros pours $125M into super PAC ahead of midtermsWho’s Bankrolling Election Deniers? Follow James Brown and Michael Beckel on Twitter.If you have a comment about the show or a question or topic you'd like us to discuss, send James Brown an email at jabrown@usatoday.com or podcasts@usatoday.com. You can also leave him a voicemail at 585-484-0339. We might have you on the show.Episode Transcript available hereAlso available at art19.com/shows/5-ThingsSee Privacy Policy at and California Privacy Notice at