PODCAST

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

FIRE

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast takes an uncensored look at the world of free expression through personal stories and candid conversations. New episodes post every other Thursday.

Ep. 160 What did ‘On the Media’ get wrong about free speech … again?
Twitter is going to become 8chan. At least, that’s what a recent episode of the popular radio program “On the Media” suggests will happen if Elon Musk successfully buys Twitter.Musk promised to bring greater free speech protections to the social media platform. But where Musk sees an opportunity for more freedom, some see the potential for too much freedom. On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, Matt Taibbi, Nadine Strossen, and Amna Khalid discuss what “On the Media” got wrong and what they got really wrong in their episode “Ghost in the Machine.” (No, “On the Media,” Twitter will not become a platform for child pornography.) This is the second time we have addressed bad free speech arguments from “On the Media.” The first time was last September, when this same group responded to the episode, “Constitutionally Speaking.” Matt Taibbi is the author of four New York Times bestselling books. He writes a popular Substack newsletter, TK News. Nadine Strossen is a professor of law, emerita at New York Law School and served for 17 years as the president of the ACLU. Amna Khalid is an associate professor of history at Carleton College and the host of a new podcast called “Banished.” Transcript: https://www.thefire.org/so-to-speak-podcast-transcript-what-on-the-media-got-wrong-about-free-speech-again/ www.sotospeakpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org
May 9 2022
1 hr 15 mins
Ep. 159 Hugh Hefner, free speech scrapbookerEp. 159 Disney and Elon MuskEp. 158 What is academic freedom?Ep. 157 Former BBC bureau chief Konstantin Eggert and what you need to know about censorship in RussiaEp. 156 What Russians don’t know about the war in Ukraine ​Ep. 155 The John Roberts Supreme CourtEp. 154 Sarah Palin v. New York TimesEp. 153 Elitist vs. egalitarian free speech (live recording, Q&A)Ep. 152 Banning critical race theoryEp. 151 Fighting wordsEp. 150 George OrwellEp. 149 Caitlin Flanagan and Greg LukianoffEp. 148 University of Austin, a new university devoted to free speechEp. 147 ‘The Mind of the Censor’ with Robert Corn-RevereEp. 146 Trigger warnings and DEI statementsEp. 145 First Amendment history with Yale Professor Akhil AmarEp. 144 Matt Taibbi, Nadine Strossen, and Amna Khalid respond to ‘On the Media’ free speech critiquesEp. 143 Politics and thought reform in K-12 educationEp. 142 Alfred Hitchcock and Hollywood’s Production Code
Hollywood’s Motion Picture Production Code, popularly referred to as the Hays Code, loomed over films in every stage of movie production from 1934 to 1968. Scripts were reviewed and altered. Actors and filmmakers were forced to redo entire scenes. Editors were asked to cut dialogue and scenes from films. Music was changed. Ultimately, directors had to be cognizant of the censors at all times. In this episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we interview three prominent guests to track the history of film censorship and the eventual demise of the Hays Code. John Billheimer, author of “Hitchcock and the Censors (Screen Classics),” explains Alfred Hitchcock’s unique methods for dealing with controversial subject matter. Laura Wittern-Keller is a professor in the History department at the University at Albany and author of several books on film censorship, including “Freedom of the Screen: Legal Challenges to State Film Censorship, 1915-1981” and “The Miracle Case: Film Censorship and the Supreme Court.” Bob Corn-Revere, partner at Davis Wright Tremaine, is a frequent guest on the show. His forthcoming book “The Mind of the Censor and the Eye of the Beholder: The First Amendment and the Censor’s Dilemma,” is due out in October. Show notes: Transcript Mutual Film Corp. v. Industrial Comm’n of Ohio Joseph Burstyn v. WilsonUnited States v. Paramount PicturesHitchcock and the Censors (Screen Classics) by John BillheimerFreedom of the Screen: Legal Challenges to State Film Censorship, 1915-1981 by Laura Wittern-KellerThe Miracle Case: Film Censorship and the Supreme Court by Laura Wittern-KellerThe Mind of the Censor and the Eye of the Beholder: The First Amendment and the Censor’s Dilemma by Bob Corn-RevereHollywood's Censor: Joseph I. Breen and the Production Code Administration by Thomas Doherty
Aug 12 2021
45 mins