MSU Today with Russ White

Russ White

MSU Today is a lively look at Michigan State University-related people, places, events and attitudes put into focus by Russ White. The show airs Saturdays at 5 P.M. and Sundays at 5 A.M. on 102.3 FM and AM 870 WKAR, and 8 P.M. on AM 760 WJR. read less
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Episodes

MSU College of Human Medicine hosts inaugural Remembrance Conference to address gun violence
4d ago
MSU College of Human Medicine hosts inaugural Remembrance Conference to address gun violence
The conference provided attendees with actions and solutions they can take back to their institutions. There’s a burgeoning relationship between Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine and the University of Buffalo’s Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. The school’s deans have brought the institutions together to advocate for a public health approach to reducing gun violence.  Aron Sousa, MD, FACP of MSU and Allison Brashear, MD, MBA of UB discuss their shared experiences with gun violence in their respective communities. They talk about how they originally came together on this subject and what led them to exchange students and begin an annual conference. And they define what they mean by a public health approach to reducing gun violence. Conversation Highlights: (0:56) – How did this “grass roots phenomenon” get started?  (5:31) – What do you mean by a public health-focused approach to gun violence? (6:58) – Talk about the February 2024 Remembrance Conference on campus and what came out of it? The 2025 conference will be in May in Buffalo. (9:25) – How can the public adopt this public health focus? The students are providing the energy. They’re our doctors of the future. Overall wellbeing is crucial. (17:04) – What are key takeaways from this conversation? Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
International artist visiting MSU for residency at intersection of art, science and technology
6d ago
International artist visiting MSU for residency at intersection of art, science and technology
As part of Michigan State University’s 2024 MSUFCU Arts Power Up artists-in-residence, Abel Korinsky (representative of Studio Korinsky) of Berlin, Germany, is in residence during the spring semester. This inaugural open call for artists is a collaboration between the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, or FRIB; the MSU Museum; the STEAMpower Project, Michigan State University’s art, science and culture collaborative; and Arts MSU. This new residency fosters collaboration, exploration, experimentation, and innovation on MSU’s vibrant campus, culminating in the creation of groundbreaking artworks at the intersection of art, science and technology. Korinsky talks with Morgan Butts, director of communications and marketing for University Arts and Collections. Conversation Highlights: (1:13) - Can you tell us a little about how you found this residency and what interested you?  (2:14) - This residency is really built on the intersection of the arts and the sciences. Can you tell us a little more about how you’ve explored this intersection in your past work?  (3:15) - You’ve been here at MSU and working closely with FRIB for a few weeks now. What sorts of interactions have you had and where are you now in terms of thinking of the work you’ll create in response to this experience?  (5:04) - From your perspective, what are some of the similarities and differences between art and science? What can artists and scientists learn from each other? (6:48) - You have a series of public engagements during your residency, including one coming right up on April 11. Can you tell us about the Intersection Conversation?  (8:04) – What is University Arts and Collections? (8:26) – What’s coming up on campus in the next few weeks? (8:56) – Generous sponsors supported Abel’s visit. Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
MSU drives conversation, research on the future of work
Apr 5 2024
MSU drives conversation, research on the future of work
You have likely heard about ChatGPT, and you might even have the application downloaded on your phone. But have you thought about how technology — and artificial intelligence specifically — will impact your job and the future of work? Michigan State University’s College of Social Science launched the  Future of Work initiative to answer this very complex question, starting by hosting the university’s first Future of Work Conference. Faculty from across MSU colleges and representatives from community organizations came together to collaborate and engage on this subject. Expert-led interactive discussions centered on four topics, including human interaction with artificial intelligence, accessibility changes to technology, new skills in the labor market and government engagement. Tara Behrend is the initiative’s director and John Richard Butler II Endowed Professor in the School of Human Resources and Labor Relations. Hye Jin Rho is an assistant professor in the school. Conversation Highlights: (1:21) – Tara on her background and interest in the future of work and on how the land-grant mission attracted her to MSU. “Technology doesn’t make decisions. People make decisions.” (3:04) – Hye Jin on her background and research interests. MSU’s interdisciplinary approach attracted her. (7:19) – Why did you think this topic necessitated a conference? (9:28) – How do you define “future of work?” (12:10) – What were conference themes? Who was there? And what are some things that came out of it? (15:57) – More on Hye Jin’s research. “Technology isn’t inherently good or bad. How is it used? It’s important to consider employee input on how technology is deployed.” (19:52) – Artificial intelligence will greatly impact the future of work, right? What is automation surprise? (24:17) – What’s the state and future of remote work? “Many managers don’t know how to manage a remote workforce. What tasks need to get done and how many of them need to happen in person?” (30:32) – What new questions do you have coming out of the conference? And if you were the czar of the future of work, what initiatives would you try to implement? (33:30) – The School of Human Resources and Labor Relations is on the cutting edge of many important trends. Everything that’s global is local first. (35:12) – The conference is just the beginning of MSU’s Future of Work initiative. And what are some key takeaways from this conversation? (42:10) – Has the power balance tipped a bit more in employees’ direction? Are unions on the rise? Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
Alumni Ashton Henderson and Jack Ebling reflect on MSU Com Art Sci’s impact on their lives and careers
Apr 2 2024
Alumni Ashton Henderson and Jack Ebling reflect on MSU Com Art Sci’s impact on their lives and careers
Ashton Henderson and Jack Ebling are 2024 Outstanding Alumni Award honorees from MSU’s College of Communication Arts and Sciences. Henderson received his bachelor’s in advertising in 2010 and his master’s in public relations in 2012. He is currently Spartan Athletics’ director of Championship Resources and Culture. Ebling earned a bachelor’s in radio and television in 1973 and another bachelor’s in communication in 1975. He owns Ebling Media and hosts the “Drive with Jack” and “Press Pass.” Ashton and Jack talk about what attracted them to Com Art Sci at MSU and how their experiences impacted them. And they talk about challenges and opportunities ahead for journalism and intercollegiate athletics. Conversation Highlights: (0:49) – How does it feel to receive this honor? (2:27) – What attracted you to MSU, and how did your experience impact you? (7:03) – Ashton, what are championship resources, and what culture are you building? (9:01) – What is name, image, and likeness (NIL), and tell us about Spartan Nation NIL. (11:40) – Jack, how has journalism evolved and what are its challenges and opportunities ahead? (15:08) – Ashton asks Jack for his views on the challenges and opportunities ahead for intercollegiate athletics. (18:00)- Jack asks Ashton about the biggest challenge he faces. What keeps him up at night? (21:30) – Final thoughts. Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
Out of the Darkness MSU Campus Walk to inspire hope while raising awareness and funds for suicide prevention
Apr 1 2024
Out of the Darkness MSU Campus Walk to inspire hope while raising awareness and funds for suicide prevention
Courtney Brown and Sarah Fay-Koutz are social workers with University Health and Wellbeing’s Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS). For the second year, CAPS is collaborating with the Michigan Chapter of American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) to hold an Out of the Darkness MSU Campus Walk on April 14. Courtney and Sarah are co-chairing the walk this year. The goal of the Out of the Darkness Walk is to start conversations that inspire hope while raising awareness and funds for suicide prevention. The walk sends the message that when it comes to suicide, no one must travel on their journey alone.   If you or someone you know is in a crisis, please call 988 or text TALK to 741-741. Conversation Highlights: (1:51) – Frame the issue. (3:22) - Suicide is a topic that no one wants to talk about. (5:01) – What are some of the warning signs? (6:29) - Myth: If you ask someone about suicide, it will give them the idea and encourage them to do it.  (8:43) – What’s the mission and the purpose of the walk? The theme is Hope Starts Here. (11:20) – Participating in the walk is a “moving experience.” (13:14) – “I see you. You are strong. Please give it one more day.” Register and donate today for Out of the Darkness Walk MSU Campus Walk: https://supporting.afsp.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.event&eventID=9977    Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
MSU IPPSR State of the State podcast examines evolving Arab and Muslim voter preferences
Mar 22 2024
MSU IPPSR State of the State podcast examines evolving Arab and Muslim voter preferences
Matt Grossmann, Charley Ballard, and Arnold Weinfeld discuss Michigan and national politics, policy, and the economy on the monthly State of the State podcast from MSU’s Institute for Public Policy and Social Research (IPPSR). The podcast is a monthly round up of policy and research for Michigan.  Nura Sediqe is an assistant professor of American politics and public policy at MSU. The group discusses Sediqe’s work in political behavior, race, and ethnic politics, especially as it pertains to Muslim Americans. Conversation Highlights: (0:44) – Charley, how’s the economy doing? (5:24) – Matt, how do you see the economy playing a role in the campaign season? (8:17) – Why do you think some minority voters are moving to the right? (12:54) – Where are we on redistricting and the redrawn map? (15:14) – What’s the state of Michigan’s economy? (17:35) – Nura joins the conversation with an overview of her research. (18:56) – Talk about the growth of the Arab and Muslim population in Michigan that is increasingly flexing its political muscle. (27:23) – How will the conflict in Gaza impact voter preferences? (29:59) – Michigan has a large population that is Arab but not Muslim. How is that factoring in?  (31:40) – Tell us about your book in development. Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
MSU receives $25M to take lead on long-term health care needs of Michigan residents
Mar 5 2024
MSU receives $25M to take lead on long-term health care needs of Michigan residents
Michigan State University has received a $25 million grant that will address the state’s critical shortage of direct care workers, or DCWs, by establishing a Direct Care Career Center that aims to increase pathways into the field and transform the public view to one that recognizes the workforce as a respected profession.    DCWs provide long-term support to individuals with disabilities and older adults. They assist with hands-on care and tasks needed to maintain as much independence as possible. Paid direct care assistance beyond what families can provide is often a necessity, but there is a dire shortage of people trained to do this kind of work. Employers are facing serious challenges in hiring and retaining staff. About 190,000 DCWs are currently serving the state’s residents; at least 36,000 more are needed.     The grant will be implemented by MSU’s IMPART Alliance, a center in the College of Osteopathic Medicine’s Department of Family and Community Medicine that’s committed to helping Michigan expand and support the direct care workforce through training, credentialing, career paths and advocacy. Serving as the convener and working with a statewide network of partners, the alliance will develop multiple initiatives designed to lead to more qualified direct care workers and improved recruitment and retention.   Clare Luz is executive director of IMPART Alliance. David LaLumia is executive director of the Area Agencies on Aging Association of Michigan. Jennifer Lugo is a direct care worker.  Conversation Highlights: (1:08) – “Yes, there is a very, very critical shortage of direct care workers right now in Michigan and across the United States.”  (1:58) – What are the primary reasons for the shortage? (3:18) – What will the “game changing” grant help you do? (7:50) – What is the Direct Care Career Center? (11:48) – What is the IMPART Alliance? (14:14) – Clare introduces us to David and Jennifer (15:11) – Jen speaks from the heart on her rewarding career and some of its challenges. (16:37) – How do you see the grant benefitting you and your fellow direct care workers? (19:25) – Are there facts about your career you’d like to reinforce and some myths you’d like to dispel? (20:41) – Dave weighs in with his enthusiasm for the project. (23:30) – Luz on progress made in the last few years. (29:22) – Dave add his appreciation for Michigan’s leadership. (30:33) – Jen on the Nursing Home Workforce Stabilization Council. (33:55) – What would you say to others considering direct care work? (36:18) – Next steps. Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
MSU program champions leadership opportunities for women in business
Mar 3 2024
MSU program champions leadership opportunities for women in business
A game-changing gift to Michigan State University’s Broad College of Business seeks to address the gender gap and propel women graduates into the C-suite. The gift, from Priya Balasubramaniam (MBA ’01), establishes the Dashney Women’s Leadership Accelerator, or DWLA, to equip dozens of students each year with the abilities and confidence to pursue professional leadership positions. With long-term mentoring, coaching, workshops, and experiential learning opportunities, the DWLA provides a powerful, immersive experience for select undergraduates. Balasubramaniam, vice president of operations at Apple Inc., says the unwavering support she received from Dashney was her driving inspiration to pay it forward. Whether it meant knowing she had someone who cared or having a sounding board to provide meaningful guidance when facing professional challenges, she found Dashney’s mentorship immensely helpful. Dashney talks about the vision and mission of DWLA with two members of the inaugural cohort of DWLA Scholars, Abigail Peck, and Khadija Kapuswala. Conversation Highlights: (0:38) – What’s the vision and mission of DWLA? (2:15) – Tell us about Priya and your relationship with her? (5:19) – Helen, introduce us to DWLA Scholars Abigail and Khadija. (6:12) – Abby introduces herself. (7:40) – Khadija introduces herself. (8:57) – Khadija on what attracted her to DWLA. (10:17) – Abby on what she’s getting from DWLA. (11:10) – Helen, how do you work with the students? (13:24) – Khadija and Abby share advice for future scholars. (15:39) – The inaugural DWLA event is on March 8. (18:18) – The first group of DWLA Scholars is laying the foundation for the accelerator. Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
MSU Interim President Teresa K. Woodruff looks back on shared accomplishments as she moves into a new role of service to the university
Feb 22 2024
MSU Interim President Teresa K. Woodruff looks back on shared accomplishments as she moves into a new role of service to the university
Michigan State University interim president Teresa K. Woodruff elaborates on topics she covers in her February 2024 Spartan Community Letter, which you can read by clicking on the communications tab at president.msu.edu.  In her letter, President Woodruff looks back on shared accomplishments as she moves into a new role of service to the university. (0:58) - Upon your appointment as interim president of Michigan State University 16 months ago, you asked us to join you in looking upward and reaching high. You talked about bringing “stagility” to the campus and on being a transformative leader in a time of transition. How are you reflecting as you prepare to hand the reigns of the university over to Kevin Guskiewicz? (1:46) - You write that student success is our prime mission. What do we mean by student success at MSU and what are some of the ways we’re making progress? (4:38) - A key theme in MSU Strategic Plan 2030 is discovery, creativity, and innovation for excellence and global impact. MSU’s research enterprise grew by $84.8 million in 2023 to a total of $844 million. That robust growth comes on top of a $49 million rise the prior year and puts us on a great trajectory to reach our strategic goal of $1 billion in annual research outlays by 2030.  (7:11) - The health and safety of students, faculty, and staff remain a top priority. This includes the leadership of people like Chief Safety Officer Marlon Lynch and the additions of Dr. Alexis Travis as vice provost and executive director of our new University Health and Wellbeing division, and Laura Rugless to lead our Office of Civil Rights and Title 9 Education and Compliance.   (9:04) - How are we doing on diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives? And the new free-standing multicultural center is rising in the heart of campus. (10:49) - You often say that our talented and dedicated employees are MSU’s greatest asset. What are some ways we’re making MSU a great place to work? (13:35) - On the stewardship and sustainability front, the new all-funds budget system lays the foundation for financial management transformation to improve functionality, transparency, and access to information. And MSU continues to rank high nationally in sustainability leadership within higher education. (15:01) - In the land grant tradition, engagement in our communities has been a priority for you. That includes initiatives in Lansing, Flint, Grand Rapids, and Detroit. (17:22) - In placemaking, we have many exciting plans for new and revitalized facilities supporting future research, instruction and outreach on our East Lansing campus and off. This includes the School of Packaging, the MSU Museum, and the Engineering and Digital Innovation Center (EDIC). (20:37) - We’re saying goodbye to impactful Spartans like Chief Safety Officer Marlon Lynch and MSU Safe Place Director Holly Rosen.  (22:10) – What are your thoughts on our generous donors and passionate alumni? (23:30) - Talk about your new role of special adviser to the offices of the MSU president and provost and your return to your research pursuits as a proud faculty member. Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
Hip-hop pioneer shares “circle of wisdom” at MSU lecture series
Feb 9 2024
Hip-hop pioneer shares “circle of wisdom” at MSU lecture series
MC Lyte is an American rapper, DJ, actress and entrepreneur. She is the first female of hip-hop’s emcees to release a solo album. She also opened doors for many to join what is now being celebrated as ’50 Years of Hip Hop.” She recently received the “I Am Hip Hop” Lifetime Achievement Award from BET and was honored at the VH1 Hip Hop Honors. Lyte was at MSU on February 8 to participate in the MSU College of Osteopathic Medicine’s Dr. William G. Anderson Lecture Series, Slavery to Freedom: An American Odyssey. “This year marks the 50th year of hip hop. MC Lyte is one of the baddest women in the game, and she has certainly managed to evolve as a hip hop artist and MC,” says Marita Gilbert, associate dean for diversity and campus inclusion at MSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. “She’s a really strong advocate for giving women a voice–not just in music–and for how we can empower girls to walk into their own potential and do things they want and what they’re passionate about as their voices grow, stretch, and evolve.” Gilbert leads Lyte through this thoughtful conversation. Conversation Highlights: (0:50) – Marita, tell us about Lyte and why you wanted her to be a part of the lecture series. (2:42) – Lyte, why did you choose to participate in the Slavery to Freedom Lecture Series? (3:50) – Lyte, what messages do you hope to convey during the lecture?  (4:39) – Marita, what are you hoping attendees take from the discussion? (7:07) – How are you reflecting on 50 years of hip-hop? (17:41) – You’re now working with a five-year-old? (18:57) – What words of encouragement do you have for young people? (24:16) – Talk about your creative process. (27:07) – You’re the voice of the Grammys… Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
Meet Joyce DeJong, new dean of MSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine
Feb 8 2024
Meet Joyce DeJong, new dean of MSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine
Joyce deJong is the new dean of the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine. An alumna of the college, she began her appointment on Feb. 5, 2024. A nationally recognized forensic pathologist, deJong (pronounced DEE-young) was a professor and founding chair of the Department of Pathology at the Western Michigan University Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine, or WMed. She is also the medical examiner for 12 counties in Michigan, overseeing multiple deputy medical examiners and nearly 100 medical examiner investigators.   She is a graduate of the MSU College of Osteopathic Medicine and was an associate professor in the MSU Department of Neurology and Ophthalmology and pathology division while she was the medical director for forensic pathology at Sparrow Hospital in Lansing.  Conversation Highlights: (0:30) – What’s your background, and what are some career highlights? (2:39) – Did you initially think you would pursue law as a career? (4:20) – Why did you choose to attend MSU for medical school? (6:04) – What’s the difference between a DO and an MD? (9:46) – What made you want to be dean of your alma mater? (11:40) – What are some of your goals for the college? (13:51) – Describe the evolving mission of the college. (15:21) – What’s the state of the profession your students are entering? (16:41) – What are challenges and opportunities ahead for the college and MSU? Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
Michigan State University campus safety and security update
Jan 30 2024
Michigan State University campus safety and security update
Michigan State University Vice President and Chief Safety Officer Marlon Lynch provides a campus safety and security update. Throughout the past year, the MSU Department of Police and Public Safety (DPPS) has been hard at work enhancing several different campus safety and security initiatives.  Following the violence our community experienced in February 2023, we continue to stand together as a community. And Lynch says MSU DPPS stands committed to ensuring the safety of our Spartan community.  Conversation Highlights: (1:28) - The third-party after-action review by Security Risk Management Consultants (SRMC) was completed in October 2023.  (2:48) - There are new metal detectors around campus that are allowing guests to enter venues quicker, while also ensuring overall safety.  (4:46) - Enhancements to the MSU Alert systemLog in to alert.msu.edu to review and update your notification preferences. You can also download the SafeMSU app and enable push notifications to receive alerts.  (9:22) - Door Lock Installations As of January 2024, the door lock installation project is 82 percent complete for identified classrooms. You can learn more about the new locks on the Safety Tips page.   (12:12) - MSU DPPS continues to develop the new MSU Security Operations Center, or SOC.  (13:23) - Active Violence Incident (AVI) Training Online-based active violence incident, or AVI, training is now available to all MSU students, faculty, and staff. In addition to the online training, MSU DPPS offers in-person training for students, faculty, and staff. More at the Community Program Participation page.  (14:31) - How are you reflecting on February 13, 2023? (16:16) - Moving Forward – Key Takeaways Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
MSU IPPSR State of the State podcast examines Michigan redistricting and remapping process
Jan 26 2024
MSU IPPSR State of the State podcast examines Michigan redistricting and remapping process
Matt Grossmann and Arnold Weinfeld discuss Michigan and national politics, policy, and the economy on the monthly State of the State podcast from MSU’s Institute for Public Policy and Social Research (IPPSR). The podcast is a monthly round up of policy and research for Michigan.  Tony Daunt is executive director of FAIR Maps Michigan. He joins the conversation to discuss the redistricting process in Michigan, the current remapping process, and what brought us to this point. Conversation Highlights: (0:32) – What’s the latest in national politics and the presidential race? (5:58) – An assessment of proposals in Governor Whitmer’s State of the State address and the state of politics and policy in Michigan. “This last year was one of the most productive and ideological movements of public policy that we’ve seen across any state for, like, 50 years. This was an extraordinary move leftward that they accomplished in the first year, and they’re set up to try to do a lot more.” (9:27) – Economic development, R & D tax credit, and population growth – “The business location packages really don’t impact business decisions. People make business location decisions and then rack up the tax credits.” (14:27) – Daunt joins the conversation to talk about the remapping process. (19:50) – What would you rather have seen from the beginning of the redistricting process? (23:12) – How is the redraw going so far? (25:36) – What is the role of FAIR Maps Michigan? And what are some of your suggestions moving forward? Where is this headed? (31:22) – “The commission has been rather defiant about the lawsuit, and I would encourage everyone to see this as an opportunity to correct, by all accounts, the biggest defect in the process. The public remains supportive of the changes, especially the changes to the partisan composition of the relationship between districts and statewide votes. This was the primary citizen concern expressed quite loudly and clearly. But that was ignored by the commission. So rather than see it as a burden imposed by the courts, I would encourage them to see it as a second chance to correct the biggest defect in the process.” Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
Alienware – Dell Technologies' gaming arm – invests in esports lounge at MSU
Jan 17 2024
Alienware – Dell Technologies' gaming arm – invests in esports lounge at MSU
Thanks to a partnership with Dell Technologies and its iconic gaming brand, Alienware, a new space at Michigan State University provides an elite gaming environment for students to train and compete in esports at the highest level.   Supported by MSU College of Communication Arts and Sciences, or ComArtSci, the Alienware MSU Esports Lounge is the university’s first dedicated space for students engaged in esports, a rapidly growing industry centered around organized professional or semiprofessional competitive video game play. It also is the first higher education esports facility Alienware has helped establish in Michigan.   The Alienware MSU Esports Lounge is a 1,027-square-foot space located on the main floor of the MSU ComArtSci building. The lounge is open to all MSU students and features 12 Alienware Aurora R16 battle stations — Alienware’s most advanced and most powerful desktop yet, powered by 14th Gen Intel Core processors — as well as Alienware m16 laptops, console gaming space, a varsity room and broadcast studio.  The university celebrated the opening of the Alienware MSU Esports Lounge on Jan. 17 with special guests,including former MSU women’s basketball player Aerial Powers, a brand and diversity ambassador with Team Liquid, a well-known esports organization, and WNBA player with the Minnesota Lynx. Michigan Lt. Gov. Garlin Gilchrist was also in attendance.  This facility provides a hands-on esports experience for the Spartan gaming community and hosts team competitions.  Comments from ribbon cutting participants: (0:00) – Interim Com Art Sci Dean Teresa Mastin (3:24) – MSU Esports Director Chris Bilski (6:33) – MSU Trustee Dennis Denno,  (7:33) – Interim MSU President Teresa Woodruff (12:32) – Michigan Lieutenant Governor Garlin Gilchrist (17:21) – Dell Director of Gaming Matt McGowan (20:30) – MSU alumna and Esports influencer Aerial Powers Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
“Crazy culinarian:” Shake up Dry January by experimenting, exploring nonalcoholic beverages
Jan 16 2024
“Crazy culinarian:” Shake up Dry January by experimenting, exploring nonalcoholic beverages
Adam Roy, food and beverage expert in Michigan State University’s Broad College of Business, has spent decades as a five-star chef and leader in the hospitality industry and is passionate about fermentation and nonalcoholic beverages. As the Dr. Lewis J. and Mrs. Ruth E. Minor Chef-Professor of Culinary Management in MSU’s School of Hospitality Business — the No. 1 public hospitality program in the U.S. — Roy explores what it takes to craft a delicious nonalcoholic beverage and provides tips for a successful Dry January. And he talks about the evolving hospitality industry and MSU’s preeminent School of Hospitality Business. Conversation Highlights: (0:28) – What’s your background as a “crazy culinarian?”  (2:34) – What is Dry January? (3:32) - What does it take to craft a good nonalcoholic beverage? (4:22) - Why has the low and nonalcoholic beverage market taken off? (4:53) - How have you seen companies capitalize on the rising popularity of nonalcoholic drinks? (5:50) - For someone thinking about going sober for Dry January, what are your tips for success? (7:03) – What attracted you to MSU? (8:07) – How did MSU’s program become one of the country’s best schools for hospitality business? (8:50) – How is the school’s mission evolving? (10:38) – What’s the state of the hospitality industry your students are entering? (11:55) – Where do you stand on tipping? (13:13) – What are challenges and opportunities facing the hospitality industry? (14:43) – Why should a student choose to get into the hospitality industry, and why should they come to MSU? Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
Survey to assess physical, mental, and social health and wellbeing of MSU students, faculty, and staff
Jan 9 2024
Survey to assess physical, mental, and social health and wellbeing of MSU students, faculty, and staff
MSU’s Health and Wellbeing (UHW) Division is conducting a university-wide health and wellbeing assessment that includes an anonymous survey. The purpose of this assessment is for UHW to gain a deeper understanding of issues impacting MSU students, faculty, and staff as it relates to physical health, mental health, and social wellbeing.  The results of the survey will contribute to the development of a 5-year plan for MSU to equitably support Spartan health and wellbeing. Specifically, UHW will comprehensively assess: ·       The health of the student, staff, and faculty populations ·       Identify prevalent health trends and issues, and  ·       Gather data essential for tailoring and enhancing support services, resource allocation, and policies to promote a culture of wellbeing on campus.  All students, faculty and staff are encouraged to complete the survey.  The information shared will be kept confidential. The survey takes 8-10 minutes to complete. For additional information, visit: https://uhw.msu.edu/assessment. Discussing the assessment and survey on this episode of MSU Today are Dr. Norman Beauchamp, Jr, MD, MHS, MSU executive vice president for Health Sciences, executive sponsor of the sustainable health theme in the MSU Strategic Plan 2030, and co-chair of the MSU Health and Wellbeing Assessment; Dr. Alexis Travis, assistant provost and executive director of MSU University Health and Wellbeing; and Dr. Renee Canady, MPHI CEO and assistant professor at MSU’s College of Human Medicine Charles Stewart Mott Department of Public Health. Conversation Highlights: (2:23) – “UHW is supporting a community where health and wellbeing is equitably woven into all aspects of campus life.” (2:58) – “The beauty of MPHI is that we are a living and breathing demonstration of governmental and academic innovation.” (3:44) – How does UHW define health and wellbeing? – “It’s a complete sense of physical, mental, and social health and not just the absence of disease or infirmary.” (6:02) – Why is health and wellbeing a priority for students, faculty, and staff and how does it impact student success and staff and faculty success?  (7:52) – Who should take the survey and what do you hope to learn from it? (9:02) – “This survey is about voice.” (11:55) – “MSU could have easily completed this project without us. The fact that they saw partnership as vitally important is what we do.” (13:02) – What will you do with the data compiled from the survey? (14:48) – How does the assessment fit into the sustainable health theme of MSU Strategic Plan 2030? (17:29) – “It’s my hope that people will not only participate, but that they’ll be better for having participated.” For additional information, please visit: https://uhw.msu.edu/assessment.Photo credit: Donna Hondorp. Left to right: Beauchamp, Canady, Travis Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.
MSU alumni making their mark in sound engineering and mixing in Hollywood
Dec 14 2023
MSU alumni making their mark in sound engineering and mixing in Hollywood
A group of MSU alumni are making their mark in audio and sound engineering and mixing in Hollywood. And they’re garnering Emmy nominations and awards, too. The group is affectionately known as the “audio mafia.” The common denominator is longtime MSU audio teacher Gary Reid, who is also emeritus director of broadcasting and general manager of WKAR Public Media. Andy Lange (2002-2006) is up for two Emmy's in 2024. Phil DeTolve (2002-2007) and Gary Megregian (1994-1997) are up for one each for a total of 4 in January.   Pat Cyccone won the mafia’s first Emmy almost 30 years ago and has played an important role in getting all these guys started in their careers in Los Angeles. Cyccone has been mixing all of Alexander Payne's films.    Mike Olman (1987-1990) has won three Emmys with shows like “24”, “Desperate Housewives,” and Discovery Channel’s “When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth” movies. Chris Foster (2002-2006) is co-owner of a major music editing post house in LA and is nominated this year, and Luke Schwarzweller (2008-2012), the youngest alumnus, mixed the last Indiana Jones film, Ferrari, and West Side Story, essentially doing Steven Spielberg's work.   Conversation Highlights: (1:22) – What does it mean to be an audio or sound engineer/mixer? What do you do? (2:54) - “It’s not the quality of the mix that makes a good mixer. It’s having a good time with the people you’re working with and making sure that everyone’s at ease and taken care of. Those are the experiences that paying clients are going to remember.” (8:01) - “Don’t ever not take a job because you don’t know how to do it. Take it and then learn it as fast as you can.” (14:22) – “The director just has to know that you’re on his side.” (21:21) – “I got to go every day and sit in a big, giant electronic sandbox and play with all my friends.” (27:30) – “One of the things the average viewer doesn’t realize necessarily is just how much we can use sound to manipulate the viewer.” (30:29) – “It’s learning the power of sound and how it can tell a story and evoke emotion.”  (32:36) – “The ultimate compliment you can pay a music editor is that you have no idea what they actually did. If I did a good job, I’m totally invisible. Nothing I did should be noticed.” (35:45) – “The upside and the downside of what we all do as professionals in sound is that if we’re really good at what we do, you will never know we were in the room.” Listen to “MSU Today with Russ White” on the radio and through Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and wherever you get your shows.