PODCAST

Sex and Psychology Podcast

Dr. Justin Lehmiller

The Sex and Psychology Podcast is the sex ed you never got in school—and won’t find anywhere else. Kinsey Institute researcher Dr. Justin Lehmiller takes you on a journey through the psychology of sex and relationships, offering practical tips along the way that can help you take your intimate life to the next level. Learn more on Dr. Lehmiller’s blog at sexandpsychology.com
Episode 62: The Myth of the “Hormonal Woman”
Evolutionary psychologists have long argued that women’s sexual behavior is driven by hormonal changes that occur throughout the menstrual cycle, including everything from their desire for sex to their partner choice. This has fed the popular idea that hormones are really the driving force behind women’s sexuality. As it turns out, however, that’s not entirely true. In this episode, we’re going to be deconstructing the myth of the “hormonal woman” with Dr. Tierney Lorenz, a former Kinsey Institute trainee who is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Tierney studies the interaction between women’s mental, physical, and sexual health. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: What role do hormones and the menstrual cycle really play when it comes to women’s sexual behavior?Scientists have long argued that ovulation triggers changes in sexual behavior, but it turns out that having sex can actually trigger ovulation. So what does this mean for couples who are trying to get pregnant?How does having sex impact how the immune system operates?What is the key to boosting sexual desire? Can testosterone supplements help? What about medications?How do sexual health, physical health, and mental health all intersect?How can people with a history of sexual trauma go on to develop happier, healthier sex lives? This interview blew my mind in several ways, so be sure to check it out! To learn more about Tierney, follow her on Twitter @tk_lorenz and follow her lab at @lab_wish This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
2d ago
50 mins
Episode 61: “No Nut November” and the Science of Masturbation
Each November, media buzz around the annual abstinence challenge known as “No Nut November” seems to grow. This challenge involves men giving up ejaculation for the entire month. That means no sex and no masturbation—no orgasms of any kind. Those who participate do this for a wide range of reasons, but often with the intention of enhancing their health. But are there actually any health benefits to abstaining from orgasm for prolonged periods of time? To dive into what the science says, I spoke with Dr. Joshua Gonzalez, a board-certified urologist who is fellowship-trained in Sexual Medicine. We give a research-based take on “No Nut November,” while also offering a crash course in “semenology” to answer common questions about ejaculation and orgasm. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: Where does semen come from and what is it made of?How many calories are in a single “serving” of semen? Is it really a source of protein?Why are so many men concerned about their ejaculatory volume? And is there anything they can do to increase it?Can abstinence from sex and masturbation enhance athletic performance?What is the link between masturbation and health? In what ways can being sexually active (both solo and partnered) potentially boost health?What are the most common sexual difficulties men experience, and what can they do to reduce their odds of developing them?What do men need to know about having better sex? To learn more about Joshua, visit his website at joshuagonzalezmd.com. You can also check out his supplement Popstar at popstarlabs.com and follow him on social media: Instagram @JoshuaGonzalezMDTikTok @JoshuaGonzalezMDTwitter @SexMedLA This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Nov 19 2021
36 mins
Episode 60: The Science of Orgasms
What does it really mean to have an orgasm? Different people—and even different scientists—define “orgasm” in different ways, which makes this a surprisingly difficult subject to study scientifically. So how do you measure when someone has an orgasm in a research lab? For this episode, I spoke to an orgasm researcher who has figured out how to do it. Her methods and findings are absolutely fascinating and will change everything you think you know about orgasms! My guest today is Dr. Nicole Prause, a licensed psychologist and sex researcher who founded the sexual biotechnology company Liberos. She is a former Kinsey Institute trainee and has published an extensive body of research on the neuroscience and psychophysiology of sex. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: What technology do you need to study orgasms scientifically?Orgasms have both a physiological and a psychological component—but they don’t always line up in the same way for everyone. So what does it mean when someone experiences one but not the other?What does it actually mean to have multiple orgasms? Are we talking back-to-back orgasms with continued sexual stimulation? Can you take breaks? How much time can pass between each orgasm for it to count as “multiple?”Is there really a gender difference in the ability to have multiple orgasms? (The answer may surprise you!)Some people get sick every time they orgasm. What causes this post-orgasmic illness syndrome?Are there really different “types” of orgasms, or are all orgasms technically the same process?What happens inside the brain during an orgasm?For people who have trouble orgasming, what can they do about it? This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Nov 12 2021
43 mins
Episode 59: Can You “Cheat-Proof” Your Relationship?
Most people say that their ideal relationship would be monogamous. Despite this, however, a lot of people seem to have a really hard time maintaining monogamy. So why is that? And if monogamy is what you want, how can you most successfully maintain it and reduce the risk of infidelity? For the answers to these questions, I spoke with Dr. Lucia O’Sullivan, a Professor of Psychology at the University of New Brunswick. She has published over 100 peer-reviewed articles on sexual and romantic relationships and is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Sex Research. Some of the topics we discuss in this episode include: What does it mean to be “monogamous?” Do different people define monogamy in different ways?Why is it a bad idea to assume monogamy in a relationship?What works and what doesn’t when it comes to maintaining monogamy? Is there anything you can do to “cheat-proof” your relationship?What happens when someone in a monogamous relationship develops a crush on someone else? When is this harmless, and when does it become a threat to the relationship?Are some people better equipped to maintain monogamy than others?What happens when someone “poaches” a partner from another relationship? How do those relationships tend to work out?What does sex education look like around the world? To learn more about Lucia, check out her Psychology Today blog “At First Blush” and her website SexMeetsRelationships.com This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Nov 5 2021
51 mins
Episode 58: The Sex Lives of College Students
What do the sex lives of college students today look like? And how have they changed over time? I spoke with a sex educator who has amassed more than 30 years’ worth of data from students taking her university human sexuality courses. In total, she surveyed nearly 7,000 students and has obtained unique insights into how everything from kink to faking orgasms to condom use has changed since the 1990s. My guest today is Dr. Sandra Caron, a Professor of Family Relations and Human Sexuality at the University of Maine. She is an AASECT Certified Sexuality Educator and a licensed therapist. Her latest book is titled The Sex Lives of College Students. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: Has the rise of abstinence-only sex education affected the age at which young people start having sex?What is the average number of sexual partners a college student has?Why are fake orgasms on the rise among both college men and women alike?Are college students masturbating more today than they were in the past?Have college students gotten kinkier over time?How have same-sex behavior and sexual identity changed among young people?Are college students today taking more sexual risks or are they practicing safer sex? This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Oct 29 2021
51 mins
Episode 57: The Science of Sexual Fluidity and Gender Fluidity
A lot of people think about sexual orientation and gender as stable characteristics of the self--they think that people are just born a certain way. While it's certainly true that many people do demonstrate stability in these traits throughout their lives, not everyone does. Many people experience some degree of sexual and/or gender fluidity, which can manifest in unexpected shifts in identity and expression over time. To be clear, this isn't to say that sexuality and gender are conscious choices that people can simply change at will at any time, nor is it to say that sexual orientation and gender identity have no genetic or biological basis; rather, it's just that sexuality and gender can be more dynamic across the lifespan than you might think. For this episode of the podcast, I took a deep dive into the science of sexual and gender fluidity with Dr. Lisa Diamond, a Professor of Psychology and Gender Studies at the University of Utah.  She is author of the incredible book Sexual Fluidity. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: How common is sexual fluidity, and what does it look like?What is gender fluidity, and how is it similar to or different from being nonbinary or transgender?How do sexual and gender fluidity intersect? Are people who are fluid in one way more likely to be fluid in others?Where does fluidity come from, and is it possible that fluidity (as opposed to stability) is the really the norm?Are essentialist arguments, such as the "born this way" concept, necessary and helpful in the pursuit of LGBTQ+ rights?What does it mean to have a "sexual orientation?" Is it inherently about sex/gender-based attractions? Or do we all have multiple orientations, with sex/gender being just one type of orientation? This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Oct 22 2021
1 hr
Episode 56: Where Do Sexual Fetishes Come From?
People can develop sexual fetishes for virtually anything. In fact, it’s not a stretch to say that if you can think of it, somebody probably has a fetish for it. So why is that? How do fetishes develop in the first place? Are some people more likely to develop them than others? And what role does porn play in all of this? For the answers to these questions, I spoke with Dr. Jim Pfaus, a researcher in behavioral neuroscience in the Department of Psychology and Life Sciences at Charles University in Prague and with the Czech National Institute of Mental Health. Jim has conducted some fascinating research on animals that sheds important light on how fetishes might develop in humans. His studies show that rats can learn to associate sex with everything from articles of clothing to specific odors (including very aversive smells). Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: What does it mean to have a sexual fetish?How can learning theory help to explain the development of fetishes?How do people’s early sexual experiences affect their sexual turn-ons?Are some people more predisposed to developing fetishes than others?In what ways does pornography shape our sexual interests?How has porn (and what kind of porn people find to be arousing) changed over time? This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Oct 15 2021
1 hr
Episode 55: Sex, Pleasure, Consent, and the Intimate Lives of Teens Today
Today’s youth are facing a complicated landscape when it comes to sex. They live in a world where sex is all around and porn is more easily accessible than ever before, but they’re not being educated about it and they’re receiving a lot of mixed messages. So are young adults getting what they want out of sex and relationships? What do their intimate lives look like? And what can parents and schools do to better support them? For insight into these questions, I spoke with Peggy Orenstein, author of The New York Times best-sellers Boys & Sex and Girls & Sex. Her TED Talk, “What Young Women Believe About Their Own Sexual Pleasure,” has been viewed over 5 million times. Peggy conducted in-depth interviews with dozens of teens and college students about their intimate lives for her recent books, and the results were fascinating. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: How do today’s youth define the terms “sex” and “virginity?”Young women today have been empowered in many ways compared to generations past, but that doesn’t seem to be translating into sexual empowerment. Why is that?Why does pleasure need to be a central focus of sex education? How does sex ed need to change more broadly?How are young people today navigating conversations around consent?How do young men feel about “hookup culture?” Is hookup culture disenfranchising everyone?How are LGBTQ youth faring in all of this?How can parents have more effective and productive conversations about sex with their kids? To learn more about Peggy and her work, visit peggyorenstein.com This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Oct 8 2021
48 mins
Episode 54: How To Have Better Sex And Deal With Sexual Difficulties
Sexual difficulties are common, but people tend to have a really hard time talking about them. In fact, people often find it easier to avoid the subject entirely, which can lead sex to disappear in a relationship. So how can people start healthy and productive conversations about sexual difficulties? What can they do to address them? And whether sexual difficulties are present or not, how can you have better sex? For insight into these topics and more, I spoke with Jeff Abraham, CEO of the company Absorption Pharmaceuticals. Jeff built a successful tech company that allowed him to retire early—but he later emerged from retirement to run a sexual health company founded by urologist Dr. Ronald Gilbert, who developed a product called Promescent designed to help men last longer in bed. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: We’ve all heard that “sex sells,” but does it really? What are some of the challenges of running a sexual health and wellness company?How long does it usually take men and women to orgasm? What is the size of the orgasm gap?What counts as “premature ejaculation” anyway?Why is it that premature ejaculation sometimes gets misdiagnosed as erectile dysfunction?How do you bring up the topic of sexual difficulties with a partner, whether you’re the one experiencing a difficulty or your partner is?Is there anything that men can do to last longer in bed?What do both men and women need to know about having better sex? To learn more about Jeff and his company, visit promescent.com This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Oct 1 2021
48 mins
Episode 53: Everything You Think You Know About Sex Is Probably Wrong
Have you ever heard that there are 8,000 nerve endings in the clitoris, or that the clitoris has twice as many nerve endings as the penis? These statements appear as facts in countless social media posts, news articles, and books. There’s just one problem with them, though—they’re wrong. It turns out that so many of the things we think we know about sex and that we hear repeated over and over just aren’t true. That’s why this episode of the podcast is all about what we don’t know about sex. To help us set the record straight, I spoke with Dr. Lisa Dawn Hamilton. She is an associate professor of Psychology at Mount Allison University in Sackville, where she teaches about sex, gender, and neuroscience. Lisa Dawn also has a fantastic podcast called Do We Know Things? that corrects common misconceptions about sex. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: What is the G-spot, really?Do we actually know what the average penis size is?Can men have multiple orgasms, too?Does peeing after sex really reduce your risk of getting urinary tract infections?What is the real purpose of pubic hair, and how is public hair removal related to STD risk?How do hormones like testosterone and oxytocin really affect us?How do the brains of monogamous and non-monogamous men differ?What’s the connection between sexual arousal and disgust? Why does disgust sometimes become a sexual turn-on? To learn more about Lisa Dawn and her work, visit doweknowthings.com This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Sep 22 2021
50 mins
Episode 52: Sex Fantasies Around The World
Do people from different cultures have different sexual fantasies? Or are there common threads that run through our fantasy worlds? As someone who studies fantasies, these are questions that have long interested me—and now I have some answers! During my recent study abroad course on sex and culture in Amsterdam, I met the author of the largest study of erotic fantasies in the Netherlands. He traveled to festivals with a caravan and interviewed hundreds of people about their sexual turn-ons. Needless to say, I had to do a podcast with him! My guest today is Lucas De Man, an artist, TV host, and CEO of the company New Heroes. In collaboration with psychologist Mariëlle de Goede, he published a book titled Yes, Please! about his work on Dutch sex fantasies, which they are currently expanding to include a worldwide audience. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: How do you get people to open up about their sexual fantasies during an interview? And how can you be sure they’re being honest?What do our sexual fantasies tell us about ourselves?How are sexual fantasies similar around the world? How are they different?Why do Americans seem to be more into cuckolding than Europeans?Where do our sexual fantasies come from?What happens when celebrities share their sexual fantasies in front of a live audience? How do you get them to open up, and how does the audience typically respond? Learn more about Lucas here. This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Sep 17 2021
42 mins
Episode 51: American Hookup – Inside College Hookup Culture
When did college “hookup culture” actually begin? Who is it helping, and who is it hurting? And what can people today do to navigate hookup culture and casual sex in healthy ways? For the answers to these questions, I spoke with Dr. Lisa Wade, an associate professor of sociology and gender and sexuality studies at Tulane University. She is also the author of the book, American Hookup: The New Culture of Sex on Campus. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: What does the term “hookup culture” actually mean?When did college hookup culture first begin?Who is hookup culture helping? Who is it hurting?What does hookup culture look like for the LGBTQ+ community?How can young adults more successfully navigate hookup culture?How do you have good and healthy casual sex?How has the COVID-19 pandemic changed hookup culture? To learn more about Lisa and her work, visit her website at lisa-wade.com and check out her book, American Hookup. This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Sep 10 2021
48 mins
Episode 50: How Many Reasons Are There To Have Sex? At Least 237
Why do humans have sex? To many, the answer to this question might seem obvious—but the truth is that our reasons for sex are many and varied, and some of the reasons people cite might very well surprise you! For this episode of the podcast, I spoke with Dr. Cindy Meston, a Professor of Clinical Psychology and Director of the Female Sexual Psychophysiology Laboratory at the University of Texas at Austin. She has studied humans’ motivations for sex extensively and is the author of the book Why Women Have Sex: Understanding Motivations from Adventure to Revenge (and Everything in Between). Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: What are the most common reasons humans have sex?What are the least common reasons?How do reasons for sex differ across men and women?Do our reasons for sex change as we age?Why is it that genital arousal and psychological arousal don’t always line up? And what does this mean?What effect does Viagra have in women? Are there any women for whom it can offer therapeutic benefits?How does sexual arousal change sexual decision-making?How do you build and maintain a career studying sex when there’s very little research funding for it? To learn more about Cindy and her work, visit her website at mestonlab.com and check out her book, Why Women Have Sex! This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Sep 3 2021
53 mins
Episode 49: Divorce Sucks – How To Move On After Breakup
Divorce sucks. It can suck away your time and energy, your money, and, in some cases, even your will to live. So is there anything you can do to “divorce-proof” your relationship and avoid this kind of pain? And if you’re going through a divorce, how do you put the pieces back together and move forward in a healthy way? For the answers, I spoke with Dr. Patrick Markey, a Professor of Psychology and Brain Sciences at Villanova University. He is co-author of the new book F*ck Divorce: A Science Based Guide to Piecing Yourself Back Together After Your Life Implodes. We talked all about Patrick’s new book and dug into some of his fascinating research on human sexuality. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: How do you cope with the stress of divorce and breakup? What should (and shouldn’t) you do?How do you most effectively support a friend or family member who is going through a divorce?When should you stay on good terms with an ex vs. cut them out of your life completely?How do you navigate divorce where there are kids in the picture?When is the right time to get back on the dating scene, and how do you start over in a healthy way?What can you do to reduce the risk of future divorce?How does our interest in sex change throughout the year? Why is sexual desire seasonal?How do our sexual interests change following political elections? (This is fascinating!) To learn more about Patrick and his work, follow him on Twitter @patmarkey and check out his new book co-authored with Dr. Erica Slotter, F*ck Divorce. *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Aug 27 2021
51 mins
Episode 48: Sex On The Brain
Everyone’s brain is a little different when it comes to sex—and understanding how your sexual brain works is one of the keys to unlocking more pleasure and improving your sex life. That’s why this episode is all about the brain mechanisms that underlie sexual response, and it’s going to change the way that you think about sex. I interviewed Emily Nagoski, the New York Times bestselling author of the books Come As You Are and The Come As You Are Workbook. She is also co-author of Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle. She combines sex education and stress education in her work to teach women to live with confidence and joy inside their bodies. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: What is the Dual Control Model of Sexual Response and why is it crucial to understanding our own sexuality?Why do many people (but especially women) sometimes experience a disconnect between genital arousal and psychological arousal?What’s the difference between spontaneous desire and responsive desire?What can people do to boost sexual desire? And is there any role for medication in this?How can you better manage stress so that it doesn’t kill desire?What are some practical ways to improve your body image? And how can changing the way you see yourself give your sex life a boost? To learn more about Emily and her work, visit her website at emilynagoski.com and check out her books Come As You Are, The Come As You Are Workbook, and Burnout. *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Aug 20 2021
50 mins
Episode 47: The Truth About Testosterone
Testosterone is one of the most misunderstood and maligned hormones in the human body. It gets blamed for toxic masculinity, sexual assault, aggression, and more. That’s why this episode of the Sex and Psychology podcast covers what you really need to know about testosterone and how it affects us. I spoke with Dr. Carole Hooven, who is a lecturer and codirector of undergraduate studies in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University. She earned her PhD at Harvard, studying sex differences and testosterone, and has taught there ever since. Dr. Hooven is the author of the fascinating new book T: The Story of Testosterone, the Hormone that Dominates and Divides Us. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: To what extent are sex differences a product of hormones and biology vs. socialization?How does testosterone affect sexual behavior in men and women?What can transgender persons taking hormone therapy teach us about how testosterone affects all of us?What is the link between testosterone and sexual orientation?Does abstaining from masturbation really increase testosterone in men?How can a more scientifically informed understanding of testosterone benefit all of us? To learn more about Carole and her work, follow her on Twitter @hoovlet and check out her latest book T: The Story of Testosterone, the Hormone that Dominates and Divides Us. *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Aug 13 2021
54 mins
Episode 46: The Sex Education You Deserve
It’s time to reimagine sex education and start giving people the sex ed they need—and deserve. So what should that look like? That’s the subject of my latest podcast with special guest Dr. Kristen Mark. We talk all about the sex ed that does and doesn’t work and explore tips on cultivating happier and healthier sex lives and relationships, including how to keep the spark alive and how to work through sexual trauma. Dr. Mark is the Joycelyn Elders Endowed Chair and Professor in Sexual Health Education at the Institute for Sexual and Gender Health at the University of Minnesota Medical School. She is also a sex and relationship researcher and therapist, and an AASECT certified sex educator. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: What does sex education look like around the world? Which models work, and which ones don’t?Beyond reducing STIs and unwanted pregnancies, how can better sex education make society healthier overall?Why should pleasure be a central focus of sex ed?How can people in long-term relationships keep the spark alive?What should you do if you and your partner want different amounts of sex? How do you bridge that divide?How can bisexual people cultivate healthy relationships in the face of bisexual stigma?How do you cultivate a satisfying sex life if you have a history of sexual trauma? To learn more about Kristen and her work, visit her website at kristenmark.com and follow her on Twitter @Kristen_Mark *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Aug 6 2021
47 mins
Episode 45: Why Marriage Is So Hard, And How To Make It Better
Marriage is hard. And, in many ways, it’s harder today than it was in the past because what we’re asking of our partners now is so dramatically different than it was before. Whereas marriage used to be about meeting basic survival needs, it’s become more about self-actualization. And so if we want to understand how to make the institution of marriage better, we have to look at it in the context of our ever-changing needs and expectations. That’s why this episode of the podcast is all about the science of marriage and how to cultivate happier and healthier marriages. I interviewed Dr. Eli Finkel, a professor at Northwestern University, with appointments in the psychology department and the Kellogg School of Management. He is also the author of one of my favorite books, The All-or-Nothing Marriage: How the Best Marriages Work. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: How and why have our expectations for marriage changed over the last century?How do we manage conflicting needs in our relationships, such as the need for excitement and surprise vs. the need for stability and security?Can opening up a monogamous marriage help to save it?How has the pandemic shaped marriage and relationships, for better or for worse?How can we make marriage better? What can you do to keep it healthy and strong?Should we be asking less of our partners?How do you keep sex healthy and hot in a long-term relationship? To learn more about Eli and his work, visit his website at elifinkel.com and check out his book, The All-or-Nothing Marriage. *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram.  Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Jul 30 2021
50 mins
Episode 44: The Science of Kink, BDSM, and Fetishes
There are a lot of things people get wrong about kink, including the idea it’s inherently rooted in trauma and mental illness, that it’s abusive, and that kinky people can’t develop healthy relationships. That’s why this episode of the Sex and Psychology Podcast is all about the science of kink, BDSM, and fetishes! I interviewed Dr. Richard Sprott, who studies identity development, health, and well-being in alternative sexualities and non-traditional relationships. He currently teaches at California State University, East Bay and he is co-author of the book Sexual Outsiders: Understanding BDSM Sexualities and Communities. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: What’s the difference between kink, BDSM, and fetishes anyway?How common are kinky sexual interests?What is the link between kink and mental health?What’s the truth about how kink and sexual trauma are connected?In what ways can kink be healthy, or even therapeutic?Where do kinky sexual interests come from? Do they run in families?Do kinky sexual interests change with age?How should we think about kink—is it a sexual orientation or a leisure activity? To learn more about Richard and his work, visit tashra.org *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Jul 23 2021
49 mins
Episode 43: The Truth About Polyamory
People’s interest in polyamory is growing. For example, Google trends reveal that searches related to polyamory have risen significantly over the last decade. However, while interest is climbing, myths and misconceptions abound, which is why this episode of the Sex and Psychology Podcast offers a deep dive into the world of polyamory. I interviewed Dr. Heath Schechinger. He is a Counseling Psychologist at the University of California Berkeley and also maintains a private practice. Heath is the Founding Co-Chair of the Committee on Consensual Non-Monogamy within Division 44 of the American Psychological Association, and he is the Co-Founder of the Polyamory Legal Advocacy Coalition. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: Who’s into polyamory and what are the different “shapes” that a polyamorous relationship might take?What is “solo polyamory” and how does it work?What are the unique benefits of consensual non-monogamy? What are the unique benefits of monogamy?If you’re polyamorous and seeking relationship counseling, how do you go about finding an affirming therapist?What are the most common issues that come up in sex and relationship therapy with polyamorous clients?If you’re curious about exploring polyamory, what do you need to know? If you’re polyamorous, what do you need to know about maintaining healthy relationships?What’s the future of polyamory and consensual non-monogamy? Will we eventually have legal recognition of multi-partner relationships? To learn more about Heath and his work, visit his websites at drheathschechinger.com and polyamorylegal.org *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.
Jul 16 2021
54 mins

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