The Achievers Show

The Achievers

The Achievers Show is a daily source of inspiration for us, and we hope for you too. We focus on the most interesting leaders, the exciting do-ers, and the entrepreneurs who challenge our thinking. Each episode is an opportunity to listen in on a natural conversation, a style we find gets you closer to the individual and how they tick. In this format you hear their truer voice, and they generously share more about their own learnings, no matter what they had to go through to get where they are. They inspire others with their brilliance, drive and tenacity. They set goals, make decisions and execute plans as they lead companies to greatness. These are The Achievers. If you believe you are an Achiever, apply now. If your application is successful, we will feature you in a video interview, on our podcast, and across our social channels including TikTok.

Start Here
The Payroll Guy Makes Payroll Simple with Friday
Sep 29 2022
The Payroll Guy Makes Payroll Simple with Friday
"Nobody wants to mess up their payroll," says Pincus Schiff, Co-Founder of Friday, "If you do, you'll hardly get out of it." Friday is a team management software that allows small businesses to conduct their payroll, with the added benefit of helping their teams communicate and connect. Known as "The Payroll Guy," Pincus recognized that many people seek the service of payroll agents because the process is completely foreign to them, and the software that allows a company to do their processing internally is incredibly complex and time-consuming.    Dax recalls a time he met a product manager at QuickBooks and happened to mention that it wasn’t his favorite software to use.. The answer Dax received was that he wasn't QuickBooks' customer, that if the product were too easy to use, then countless HR managers, CPAs, and payroll managers would be out of a job! The disappointing realization was that these software platforms are intentionally made complicated so that the business owners will be forced to reach out for payroll help externally.    Friday offers a fine balance between being user-friendly while still providing plenty of desirable features. Pincus understands what users want because he welcomes outside feedback, both from his earliest customers to whom he first presented a beta model and from Friday's third co-founder, Martin, who brings in a tech-focused perspective to balance the HR and marketing focus within the company. Martin was the one to recognize that most users wouldn't know what "run payroll" meant and to label that particular function something more user-friendly such as "pay team."   This approach is part of Pincus's leading philosophy of providing value first. He focuses on branding himself first and foremost as an asset who provides quality, rather than any of his products. This is a sound long term approach as there is never a guarantee of where any of your ventures will be in ten years. Currently, Friday offers a feature that connects users directly to Pincus or a member of the team. One day, as the company continues to grow, he recognizes this won't be an option, and he will make himself available in a way that is commensurate to that scale.    Every company has their own specific needs, as does each individual within that company. The conversation of returning to the office post-pandemic fails to recognize that everyone will view it differently. In a previous episode of The Achievers, Andrea Hoffer explained that many people confuse working from home with work-life balance, but as Dax points out, that balance very much depends on the person's homelife. By continuing to recognize that at the heart of all business is the individual person, and by continuing to focus on meeting their needs and goals, Pincus is guaranteed continued success.  Quotes "That was the 'aha' moment for me. Let me create a product that's really simple while solving other problems like connecting a team." (3:53-4:01 | Pincus)"I once met, six or seven years ago, the product manager for QuickBooks at an informal work lunch. I was ribbing him that QuickBooks is not my favorite software to use. He looked me dead in the eye and said, 'You're not my customer. My customers are the CPAs, the bookkeepers, the payroll managers, the HR people. If we made that tool too easy for you to use, you wouldn't employ our customers.' That was such a shocking thing to hear that they are (allegedly) purposefully making the software more difficult because they want to keep these other people in business." This of course, was the view of just one employee at QuickBooks. (4:41-5:24 | Dax)"The problem with easy-to-use software is you want function, too. You want features. And the more features you add, typically, the more complicated it gets. When you build for small businesses for end users that are not CPAs or bookkeepers, you have to have a fine balance between having enough features and having a user-friendly, easy-to-use platform." (5:31-5:55 | Pincus)"I decided Friday is going to be a game for me. I can't operate out of fear and being desperate. So, I take the journey one day at a time. When you look at it from that perspective, it's pretty easy." (7:06-7:19 | Pincus)"There's a lot when it comes to payroll, and people want clarity. It's also a topic that everyone wants to stay safe with. No one wants to mess up their payroll. If you do, you will hardly get out of it." (10:55-11:08 | Pincus) "At a certain point your business has to grow. As of now, at the stage where I am, I will do whatever I can. And then at the next stage I'll do whatever I can then. We try to be the best, always." (11:51-12:01 | Pincus)"Elon Musk is one of the great examples. I think he is more of a marketer than an inventor. And Steve Jobs was a much better inventor than a marketer. Elon Musk is much stronger in branding and marketing. He built himself up. He's king on Twitter. He's one of the most respected people." (17:33-17:51 | Pincus)"Personal branding is important, especially if you're in sales. You don't know whether the company you work for is going to close, if the product is still going to be around in ten years. When you build your personal brand, people realize that you provide value to people, and you're an expert at whatever you do. It stays with you." (18:02-18:20 | Pincus)"I never talk about my products or my services. All I say is, 'This is what I did. This is what works and doesn't work for me,' or sales tips in general. I think people appreciate it, rather than just getting bored seeing people promote themselves every single day saying, 'I do this, I do this, I do this.' At some point you think, 'I know. Unfollow.' (18:28-18:55 | Pincus)"You not seeing yourself as a salesperson originally is probably why this has worked for you so well. It means you weren't out there shouting about the product all the time, and you were just providing value. If you provide value as an individual, people are more likely to sign up for what you have because you've built up a lot of that trust that is part of the natural sales process anyway." (18:58-19:23 | Dax)"When it comes to sales in general, you realize there's one thing before business, and that's people. Everything you do in business, boils down to people. The more value you provide to people, the more of an asset you are to people, the more you are going to get business." (19:40-19:53 | Pincus) "The more you give the more you get. It just works." (22:02-22:05 | Pincus)   Links Friday Website | for Pincus Schiff |      Apply to be on The Achievers show   Your Host, Dax Hamman   The Achievers is proudly partnered with:   FIRESIDE for small business marketing     Podcast production and show notes provided by HiveCast.fm
The Payroll Guy Makes Payroll Simple with Friday
Sep 29 2022
The Payroll Guy Makes Payroll Simple with Friday
"Nobody wants to mess up their payroll," says Pincus Schiff, Co-Founder of Friday, "If you do, you'll hardly get out of it." Friday is a team management software that allows small businesses to conduct their payroll, with the added benefit of helping their teams communicate and connect. Known as "The Payroll Guy," Pincus recognized that many people seek the service of payroll agents because the process is completely foreign to them, and the software that allows a company to do their processing internally is incredibly complex and time-consuming.    Dax recalls a time he met a product manager at QuickBooks and happened to mention that it wasn’t his favorite software to use.. The answer Dax received was that he wasn't QuickBooks' customer, that if the product were too easy to use, then countless HR managers, CPAs, and payroll managers would be out of a job! The disappointing realization was that these software platforms are intentionally made complicated so that the business owners will be forced to reach out for payroll help externally.    Friday offers a fine balance between being user-friendly while still providing plenty of desirable features. Pincus understands what users want because he welcomes outside feedback, both from his earliest customers to whom he first presented a beta model and from Friday's third co-founder, Martin, who brings in a tech-focused perspective to balance the HR and marketing focus within the company. Martin was the one to recognize that most users wouldn't know what "run payroll" meant and to label that particular function something more user-friendly such as "pay team."   This approach is part of Pincus's leading philosophy of providing value first. He focuses on branding himself first and foremost as an asset who provides quality, rather than any of his products. This is a sound long term approach as there is never a guarantee of where any of your ventures will be in ten years. Currently, Friday offers a feature that connects users directly to Pincus or a member of the team. One day, as the company continues to grow, he recognizes this won't be an option, and he will make himself available in a way that is commensurate to that scale.    Every company has their own specific needs, as does each individual within that company. The conversation of returning to the office post-pandemic fails to recognize that everyone will view it differently. In a previous episode of The Achievers, Andrea Hoffer explained that many people confuse working from home with work-life balance, but as Dax points out, that balance very much depends on the person's homelife. By continuing to recognize that at the heart of all business is the individual person, and by continuing to focus on meeting their needs and goals, Pincus is guaranteed continued success.  Quotes "That was the 'aha' moment for me. Let me create a product that's really simple while solving other problems like connecting a team." (3:53-4:01 | Pincus)"I once met, six or seven years ago, the product manager for QuickBooks at an informal work lunch. I was ribbing him that QuickBooks is not my favorite software to use. He looked me dead in the eye and said, 'You're not my customer. My customers are the CPAs, the bookkeepers, the payroll managers, the HR people. If we made that tool too easy for you to use, you wouldn't employ our customers.' That was such a shocking thing to hear that they are (allegedly) purposefully making the software more difficult because they want to keep these other people in business." This of course, was the view of just one employee at QuickBooks. (4:41-5:24 | Dax)"The problem with easy-to-use software is you want function, too. You want features. And the more features you add, typically, the more complicated it gets. When you build for small businesses for end users that are not CPAs or bookkeepers, you have to have a fine balance between having enough features and having a user-friendly, easy-to-use platform." (5:31-5:55 | Pincus)"I decided Friday is going to be a game for me. I can't operate out of fear and being desperate. So, I take the journey one day at a time. When you look at it from that perspective, it's pretty easy." (7:06-7:19 | Pincus)"There's a lot when it comes to payroll, and people want clarity. It's also a topic that everyone wants to stay safe with. No one wants to mess up their payroll. If you do, you will hardly get out of it." (10:55-11:08 | Pincus) "At a certain point your business has to grow. As of now, at the stage where I am, I will do whatever I can. And then at the next stage I'll do whatever I can then. We try to be the best, always." (11:51-12:01 | Pincus)"Elon Musk is one of the great examples. I think he is more of a marketer than an inventor. And Steve Jobs was a much better inventor than a marketer. Elon Musk is much stronger in branding and marketing. He built himself up. He's king on Twitter. He's one of the most respected people." (17:33-17:51 | Pincus)"Personal branding is important, especially if you're in sales. You don't know whether the company you work for is going to close, if the product is still going to be around in ten years. When you build your personal brand, people realize that you provide value to people, and you're an expert at whatever you do. It stays with you." (18:02-18:20 | Pincus)"I never talk about my products or my services. All I say is, 'This is what I did. This is what works and doesn't work for me,' or sales tips in general. I think people appreciate it, rather than just getting bored seeing people promote themselves every single day saying, 'I do this, I do this, I do this.' At some point you think, 'I know. Unfollow.' (18:28-18:55 | Pincus)"You not seeing yourself as a salesperson originally is probably why this has worked for you so well. It means you weren't out there shouting about the product all the time, and you were just providing value. If you provide value as an individual, people are more likely to sign up for what you have because you've built up a lot of that trust that is part of the natural sales process anyway." (18:58-19:23 | Dax)"When it comes to sales in general, you realize there's one thing before business, and that's people. Everything you do in business, boils down to people. The more value you provide to people, the more of an asset you are to people, the more you are going to get business." (19:40-19:53 | Pincus) "The more you give the more you get. It just works." (22:02-22:05 | Pincus)   Links Friday Website | for Pincus Schiff |      Apply to be on The Achievers show   Your Host, Dax Hamman   The Achievers is proudly partnered with:   FIRESIDE for small business marketing     Podcast production and show notes provided by HiveCast.fm
Attract, Interview & Grow Your Dream Team, with Andrea Hoffer
Sep 9 2022
Attract, Interview & Grow Your Dream Team, with Andrea Hoffer
Whether it be TikTok, Instagram, or the often underutilized Youtube, you want to find out where your potential candidates hang out on social media just as you would do with customers. Andrea explains that you should locate where candidates gather and then make your presence known there. Candidates are certainly evaluating companies via social platforms, particularly dedicated employment review sites like Glassdoor or Indeed.    Having past disgruntled employees leave a harsh review is part of what makes some businesses hesitant to promote themselves, but Andrea advises her clients to take charge of their online reputation. Those former employees will make their grievances known regardless, so seize the opportunity to address criticism head on and emphasize what kind of candidates would make a better fit for the company.    Even in a post-Covid world, there are plenty of real-life opportunities for recruitment. The old-fashioned yet surprisingly ubiquitous help wanted signs can and should be retrofitted with a QR code for instant access to an application. Incentivize people to come to your campus with offers like complimentary lunch from visiting food trucks. Current employees are a great asset to find new hires, and they can—and should—be rewarded with referral incentives.    The option for at least partial remote work is now a major consideration for many people looking for jobs. Though she’s hesitant to equate work/life balance synonymously with remote work, Andrea sees the flexibility provided by the work-from-home option is promising. She warns that companies need to be upfront about what working from home looks like according to their specific culture. Ideally, employers will start focusing more on the results and quality work that an employee produces rather than how many hours they are physically in the office.    Now, more than ever, candidates are concerned with more than just earning a paycheck. They want to know that they will bring value to the company they work for.    Quotes “You’re not looking for high volume in applications, you’re looking for quality.” (4:59-5:04 | Andrea)“People are motivated by challenges. They want to know that they add value to an organization. They’re not just looking for a paycheck.” (5:28-5:37 | Andrea) “We are in a review world, and candidates are consumers. The first thing they will do is look for everything about your company online.” (8:26-8:36 | Andrea) “Just like you would if you were marketing your company, and you’d ask where do your clients or potential clients hang out online, you do the same thing for employees. Where do they spend their time? What kind of content do they look for?” (10:32-10:44 | Andrea) “A focus on results that the team member is bringing in, and not so much that they’re chained to their desk 40 hours a week, is really what team members are looking for. And the good ones often end up working more, or knock their results so out of the park that you really don’t care.” (21:15-21:36 | Andrea)   Links Download a FREE chapter from the new book, Hire Higher. |     Apply to be on The Achievers show    Your Host, Dax Hamman Podcast production and show notes provided by HiveCast.fm Digital Marketing by FIRESIDE
The Turkish Towel That’s Saving Lives
Aug 29 2022
The Turkish Towel That’s Saving Lives
Aloha is the spirit of love and fellowship that Amy Connelly weaves into each piece of her eco-friendly beachwear and Turkish towel lines at Shaka Love.  What makes this Turkish towel so impactful is not just its weave, known for being quick drying and superabsorbent, but more importantly, buying one of these towels contributes to water conservation and equity across the globe.   As it turns out, towels soak up way more water than we thought. Manufacturing a single regular cotton beach towel requires 3,000 gallons of it! That amount is enough to sustain a person for ten years (!), yet, in many parts of the world, clean water is so scarce that each hour hundreds of people die for lack of access to it.   Amy isn’t content merely to spare water in production, she wants to see that it sustains life the way it’s meant to. For each purchase of one of her Turkish towels, customers contribute to One Atta Time, a non-profit that supplies small villages with water filtration systems, teaches the residents how to use them, and continues to follow up with the villages' progress periodically.    Her sense of community extends to her network of fellow female entrepreneurs, who come together to support and promote each other. She is inspired by, and hopes one day to work with, Autumn Pelletier, a 13-year-old activist from Alaska who is showing people the water shortages the United States experiences in its own backyard.    Having grown up on the golden beaches of Hawaii and San Diego (including where the new Top Gun movie beach scene was filmed), Amy knows how precious water is and that lack of access to it is a real crisis. Her response, again, is to foster a sense of love and fellowship. She encourages people to educate themselves on issues of water conservation and to donate to organizations dedicated to water. It is, after all, the essence of life.    Off-camera, Amy and Dax also discussed the rise of water investors, with people like Michael Burry (made famous by the movie The Big Short, with Steve Carell) making big investments in water. Quotes “A jumbo jet’s worth of people die every hour from lack of clean water.” (0:18-0:24 | Dax)“The water crisis is real. It’s not only based on lack of general water, where a lot of areas are generally dry, but the lack of clean drinking water is really serious. It’s the number one killer of children under the age of ten.” (0:49-1:07 | Amy)“I’ve been in a lot of meditative prayer over this and contemplation on how I can have this towel really make an impact, not only on saving water, but in terms of what I could do. And what came to me is that I wanted to give back, I wanted to give back that 3,000 gallons of water in some way.” (8:06-8:45 | Amy) “Every morning when I wake up, I really take a few minutes in that mindful prayer time and just ask for guidance, for grace, for wisdom. It’s really important to me.” (11:28-11:43 | Amy)“Water is the essence of life. Without it, we can’t survive.” (14:01-14:04 | Amy)    Links   Learn more about female entrepreneur Amy Connelly: Website:   Find the Top Gun 2022 Beach in Coronado, San Diego, California   Apply to be on The Achievers show   Your Host, Dax Hamman Podcast production and show notes provided by HiveCast.fm Digital Marketing by FIRESIDE
Shopify Ecommerce Is All About The Data, STOP Overthinking It!
Aug 1 2022
Shopify Ecommerce Is All About The Data, STOP Overthinking It!
“At the end of the day, 99% of your problems can be solved if you just sell what you’re trying to sell. But a lot of people don’t want to do that because it’s hard work,” says Chase Clymer, host of Honest Ecommerce.   When Chase first got into the ecommerce industry nearly a decade ago, there was what he describes as an “ugly underbelly” of get-rich-quick schemes ready to part eager people from their money. Most prominent among these was drop shipping, which, for most people, isn’t going to be lucrative. The lower the barrier to entry, the more someone’s intelligence, product, or novel take has to stand out. His advice on an alternative course of action is age-old: work hard. Add value, provide a solution, and your brand will grow steadily. Flashy things will always be tempting, and Chase admits they catch his eye, too. However, for those eager to get started, the best strategy is to learn just one valuable skill, work for a brand you love, and the rewards will be far greater than instantly being able to buy a Ferrari (that the guy posing in front of doesn’t own, by the way).  Success stories born of good old-fashioned hard work populate his aptly titled podcast “Honest Ecommerce,” so much so that extra episodes have had to be made. He interviews brand founders and subject matter experts on how they got their start, what they’ve achieved, and what their future looks like.  Chase is quick to say his own business Electric Eye, does two things: builds highly performant and beautiful Shopify themes and optimizes existing stores, making the customer experience better. It’s as important to make clear what your company doesn’t do as it is to showcase what it does. Promoting a product’s or service’s benefits is far more effective than promoting the features of something.  Lastly, Chase suggests that listeners focus on gaining customers, who, in return, become a hugely valuable resource. Don’t be afraid to ask every person you sold a product to what their impression of it was. Ultimately, you’ll want to incorporate that feedback into the second incarnation of the product and address the questions on the company website. Dax talks about the lessons the author Amy Radin teaches in her book “The Change Maker’s Playbook” and how she substituted big research budgets for simple conversations with customers in her corporate America days. So, in the end, ecommerce may not be easy, but it is simple. Data and numbers drive your sales, and you need to stop overthinking it. The Honest Ecommerce podcast is the essential companion for anyone in the ecommerce industry and critical for EVERYONE using Shopify.   Quotes “When I got into the industry seven or eight years ago, there was this ugly underbelly of Youtube. Lots of fly-by-night, get rich quick, buy my course and you’ll get a Ferrari stuff out there. I just thought, ‘That’s not real. That’s not true.’ What it takes is hard work.”(0:37-0:54 | Chase) “The original idea was just to interview people smarter than me.” (0:57-0:59 | Chase)“Drop shipping is just a race to the bottom and it’s not an industry you want to get into.” (3:51-3:55 | Chase) “The barrier of entry has never been lower to start a business or to learn ecommerce, but that also means the delta between being good is that much wider (6:41-6:52 | Chase)“At the end of the day, 99% of your problems can be solved if you just sell what you’re trying to sell. And that’s what a lot of people don’t want to focus on because it’s hard work.” (9:22-9:31 | Chase) “You can get a lot of CRO information by just asking your customers what questions they have about your product and answering those questions on your website.”(10:07-10:15 | Chase)“Ecommerce is math. Don’t overcomplicate it.” (11:10-11:12 | Chase)   Recent Honest Ecommerce Episodes include: The Importance of Trust in Growing a Business with Wylie RobinsonBuild Relationships Early In Your Business with Megan GrassellRiding the Headwinds and Tailwinds of the Pandemic with John SheldonHow A Travel Brand Survived the Pandemic with Brendan KennedyWhy You Shouldn’t Corrupt Your Email List with Kerrigan BehrensAsk Your Competitors for Advice with Will NitzeGreat Idea + Marketing + Commitment = Success with Mike AbadiYou’ll Never Learn Until You Launch with Joe Spector Links: Connect with Chase Clymer:  Electric Eye Agency ( Ecommerce Podcast ( on Twitter ( Ecommerce YouTube Channel ( on LinkedIn (  Amy Radin on LinkedIn  Amy Radin’s book, The Change Maker’s Playbook   Apply to be on The Achievers show   Your Host, Dax Hamman Podcast production and show notes provided by HiveCast.fm Digital Marketing by FIRESIDE
Podcast Spotlight: The Business Cloud, Hosted by Ryan Atkinson
Jul 22 2022
Podcast Spotlight: The Business Cloud, Hosted by Ryan Atkinson
“Oh, I’m just a 23-year-old; I don’t know anything, will you come on [my podcast] and talk about your story?”  This was the simple approach Ryan Atkinson (a senior in college when he began) took to asking some of the world’s most successful entrepreneurs, like Josh Clemente and Alexandra Zatarain. To his surprise, most agreed, and with 56 episodes and counting, The Business Cloud does a great job of discovering valuable and interesting pieces of advice. Perhaps Ryan’s podcast origin story itself is a key lesson. Rather than complaining about what he didn’t have, Ryan just asked for what he wanted. As a note, he was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes early in life and has had to manage that since. In our conversation, he described it as being like living with another person that you’re responsible for, (an eye-opening image that offered me insight into a situation many live with that I knew little about). Ryan believes that the first step to any successful endeavor is to take a chance on yourself, and perhaps that need to develop early independence is where that comes from. It is certainly reflected in his interview style. His youth makes this a different show to listen to, somehow feeling fresher than other business shows. When he discusses topics with his guests, it offers insight into what people of this generation actually think. We discussed the future of the workplace as an example, and how we hope that companies will start to honor productivity over mere attendance and allow for schedules that accommodate each individual’s peak window of productivity. Among his favorite guests is David Concannon, who was one of the first people to discover the Titanic, and who was hired by Jeff Bezos to bring back the engines of the Apollo spacecraft from the ocean floor. The Business Cloud is set for a long future, and should be absorbed by all of us that will benefit from a direct insight into the up and coming leaders and employees.   Quotes “My podcast has a wide range of guests that come on to talk a little bit more about how they got started, what their business ideas were, challenges they've overcome, and sacrifices they've made. And this is generated more for the younger twenty-something audience, just to learn a little bit more about their stories and experiences from them.” (01:35-01:54 | Ryan)“I really leverage my age; that’s a huge thing I do.” (2:30-2:33 | Ryan)“Once you have a podcast, it really just opens the door to conversations– that’s why I started it. If I didn’t have a podcast, my guests probably wouldn’t have talked with me.” (2:43-2:52 | Ryan)“One of my favorite concepts is ‘closed mouths don’t get fed.’ Really hone in and think about that. If you don’t ask, you’re not going to get it. Some people today say, ‘Oh, I don’t get anything.’ Well, did you ask? Did you put yourself out there and really expose yourself and ask?” (4:34-4:52 | Ryan)“If you’re going to work remotely, you’re going to have to take that extra step to really embrace your values and make connections. Grab someone from another department and ask them to meet up to talk about what they’re working on.” (12:48-12:58 | Ryan)“If I want it, I’m sure there are millions of other people who also want it as well. So, I think I have a unique advantage in wanting to start a business and also be in this specific diabetic industry.” (14:21-14:33 | Ryan)“Personally, I think diabetes has made me super independent just because I always have to take care of myself. I’m basically living with another person. There’s an imaginary character next to me; I’m controlling their health.” (15:20-15:43 | Ryan) Links Connect with Ryan Atkinson, Host of The Business Cloud Podcast Email: ryan@thebusinesscloudpodcast.com LinkedIn: the podcast:   Apply to be on The Achievers show   Your Host, Dax Hamman Podcast production and show notes provided by HiveCast.fm Digital Marketing by FIRESIDE
OOH Advertising is Now Mobile, Measurable, and Native!
Jul 8 2022
OOH Advertising is Now Mobile, Measurable, and Native!
Want to hear about one of the most productive commutes ever?! Red Dragon (Casey Binkley) was driving home to Toronto when he saw a truck go by with great branding on it. However, the two trucks following were blank, triggering his A HA moment that blank trucks were valuable and underutilized space for advertising! An Achiever of action, Red Dragon founded Movia, an out-of-home advertising business that wraps blank delivery trucks in advertising space for other companies, and he can count hundreds of brands like Casper mattress as clients. As Red Dragon explains, moving billboards not only get two times the impression that static billboards on the sides of highways get, but they also have twice the retention rate. Dax suggests that when we see a moving thing, we register a change, forcing us to pay attention which ultimately results in better retainment.  The trucks are installed with Movia’s patented beacon technology that connects to the WiFi and Bluetooth of people in the vicinity to track where and when they see the ad. What’s more, the beacon tracks whether people, after seeing the ad, engage with the product’s webpage and if any of the products end up in their shopping cart.  There are two distinct data sets at play in this situation. First, Movia constantly listens for devices that are looking for a Bluetooth or WiFi connection and notes a unique identifier from that device (the MAC address) so it can gauge how many people potentially saw each truck. Next, as Red Dragon explains, whenever we download an app onto our phones, we may permit it to know our location. And like most advertisers, Movia simply uses that location and matches it against its own signals to follow up with targeted advertising.  Movia has had great success in the travel, lottery, CPG, and even the entertainment space. They were hired to advertise the show The Equalizer starring Queen Latifah, around the city of Toronto. The ads, with their dark background, really popped against the white snow that blanketed the city. In a city of 6 million people, 78 percent of those who saw the trucks tuned into one episode, and more crucially for syndication purposes, 53 percent of the same group tuned in for two or more episodes.  Still, there is no replacement for human interaction. Another aspect that sets Movia apart is that people who are intrigued by the ads will engage with the truck drivers, who are equipped with handouts to give potential customers further information. This mix of pioneering technology, human nature, and human touch means that Movia has carved out a unique niche within the advertising space.     Quotes  “It starts to create this community engagement brand extension play. When you’re driving down the highway and you see a billboard on the side of the road, you know that that’s a paid ad, but when you see a working delivery truck you don’t necessarily think that’s a paid ad in market, you think ‘Oh, that’s a delivery truck out in market actually serving a purpose.”  (7:02-7:25 | Red Dragon)“The human element really sets us apart from a lot of other Out Of Home.” (8:04-8:08 | Red Dragon)“What’s unique for us and what our patent covers is the moving aspect. So we’re the leader in moving beacon technology.” (13:09-13:23 | Red Dragon)“You couldn’t not notice that if it was driving near you on the high street.” (19:54-19:58 | Dax)“Anything that’s moving tells your brain, ‘This is an exception, something’s changed, you have to pay attention to it. I think that’s where a lot of that recognition and recall comes from.” (21:42-21:52 | Dax)“It just has to do with the way your brain processes something that’s sitting on the side of the road compared to moving beside you…so from an effectiveness point of view, I think it’s more like 4X.” (20:42-21:14 | Red Dragon)    Links Connect with Movia: Movia.media Red Dragon (Casey Binkley)   Apply to be on The Achievers show   Your Host, Dax Hamman Podcast production and show notes provided by HiveCast.fm Digital Marketing by FIRESIDE
Are You Prepared For Your Legally Ever After?
Jun 20 2022
Are You Prepared For Your Legally Ever After?
“Your kids don’t need a fairy godmother, they don’t need a prince to save the day, they need you to put together an estate plan to protect them” says Pamela Maass Garrett, author of Legally Ever After. If a child does go through their own real-life Cinderella scenario, with a parent passing away unexpectedly without a legal plan in place, assets meant for them may become tied up in legal confusion, and they may end up living with people that would not have been who their parents would have chosen for them. Despite the importance of getting it right, parents tend to put off estate planning for a number of reasons. Some find it very difficult to talk about, particularly if they are a member of a culture or generation where things like money can be seen as taboo subjects. Others have the idea that the planning process is all about death, a subject they can not bring themselves to focus on. Every family handles it differently, but there are some interesting similarities in each generation. The Millennial generation, now 42 on the top end of their age bracket, seem to be ready to get this done more readily. Perhaps it is because many are now a member of the ‘sandwich generation’, meaning they have their own kids in the house, but also their parents have moved back in too. Or perhaps as the group set to inherit more wealth than any generation previously, and who can see that their own parents haven’t done a good job of preparing themselves, they understand the importance of a solid plan.   Pamela’s book, Legally Ever After, helps families understand how to protect their assets and their childrens’ futures in a clear and simple way. This easy to understand guide consists of six steps, each of which is named for one letter in the acronym L.E.G.A.C.Y. Starting with “L,” Pamela starts with the very important step of defining “Longterm Guardians,” and urges readers to name the people they’d want to care for their children, should something happen to them.  There is so much to take from our Achievers discussion with Pamela, including learning the easiest first step to setting up a plan, the best way for blended families to navigate estate planning, and how often you should check in with your estate lawyer. Legally Ever After will literally change lives for the better, and be an essential guide for anyone that hasn’t yet put a plan in place. A must read for every family.   Quotes “Really, estate planning is for everyone. If you’re alive, you need some kind of plan of what would happen.” (2:14-2:20 | Pamela)“Estate planning is one of those things that people tend to put off until it’s too late. And when I hear from clients, it’s usually because someone they know passed away unexpectedly.” (3:19-3:29 | Pamela)“If something were to happen to you, do your loved ones know what you have and where it is?” (3:42-3:45 | Pamela) “When it comes to legacy, putting plans in place, and planning for death, the Millennial generation are putting plans in place at an unprecedented rate because they really do care about it.” (5:15-5:26 | Pamela)    Links Buy Legally Ever After, on Amazon Connect with Pamela on the Law Mother Website     Apply to be on The Achievers show   Your Host, Dax Hamman Podcast production and show notes provided by HiveCast.fm Digital Marketing by FIRESIDE
UNTIE THE KNOT Is Your Essential Divorce Companion
Jun 20 2022
UNTIE THE KNOT Is Your Essential Divorce Companion
In the state of Colorado, 80% of divorces have at least one party of the two that elects to handle the process without an attorney, yet arriving at a long term, successful outcome is a specialist skill, where experience really makes a difference. Many will find the paperwork to be complicated and unfamiliar, and if they need to attend court, that environment has its own language / required ways of behaving that might feel intimidating in the moment. Additionally there are often important topics that those of us who are not experts may simply not think to include in the agreements, causing disagreements in the future (i.e.what role do any future step parents have, what happens if the child want to change their religion, are you aligned on the preferred type of education, what is your approach to sleepovers at different ages, etc.). There are multiple reasons though why someone goes it alone, including being unable to meet the upfront expenses of hiring legal counsel, or thinking that their particular divorce situation is simple and amicable, and don’t think they need a 3rd party to be involved. Without a guide by their side, these individuals often only realize the downsides of what they have agreed to in a legally binding document after it is too late. In our discussion Kelley highlights some of the worst consequences of self-representation. Self-Represented AND Fully Supported! This is why Kelley created “Untie The Knot”, so that everyone dealing with divorce in Colorado can have a guide through the divorce process. Untie The Knot is a video series presented by Kelley herself that teaches you the parts of the law that you really MUST understand to successfully complete the paperwork to file a case. For each phase of the process there is a video that breaks it down for you and helps you avoid all the common mistakes.  Every member has a private coaching session to discuss the specifics of their own case and a chance to ask any questions that they have, and access to private Facebook groups where a community of members can help each other through the process. If you are facing divorce and are choosing to go it alone, or if you are working with an attorney but want to understand the process in more depth and at your own pace, get the education and support you need to represent yourself with confidence. Episode Quotes “Court is truly a different environment. You talk about speed– and there’s language, there’s procedure. You talk differently, you dress differently, there’s a cadence and a procedure that’s different and unlike any other place ever.” (6:11-6:34 | Kelley)“What are some of the consequences when people self-represent?”(8:13-8:18 | Dax)“That’s also what Untie the Knot talks about is expectations–not just of yourself as a party but of the other party, of the court, so that we’re really level-setting and we’re really talking the truth.” (11:47-12:01 | Kelley)“So going through those exercises, you can start with what your initial thoughts and priorities are, Untie the Knot then teaches you which of those are even real or feasible or ever going to happen, you can reassess your own priorities and then go back to the process.”(18:48 | Dax)“Attorneys should not have a dog in the fight. They should want their client to make the most informed decision possible, irrespective of what the outcome is. At the end of the day, I as a lawyer just want to make sure you understand your agreement.” (23:18-28:43 Kelley)  Episode Links Untie The Knot, your essential divorce companion   Apply to be on The Achievers show   Your Host, Dax Hamman Podcast production and show notes provided by HiveCast.fm Digital Marketing by FIRESIDE
The ”Think Tank” Choice Lenders Face Over AMC Providers
Jun 17 2022
The ”Think Tank” Choice Lenders Face Over AMC Providers
Purchasing a home is the most significant investment most people will ever make. Yet a lot of people don’t know what goes on behind the scenes of the appraisal process, or that they can choose the best person for the job. Rob Johnson, with his natural salesmanship and extensive background in software, felt that he and Adam Millson, an appraiser, were the best people for this niche industry. The two veterans drive Think Tank, a boutique residential appraisal firm. With 23 locations across the United States and growing, it turns out they were right.  Even as desktop, or remote appraising, gains a foothold, Rob is confident of the many benefits of using a traditional appraiser, especially a boutique firm like his. Not only for the training that goes into appraising, but for the human interaction and attentiveness clients receive each and every time they call Think Tank.  On this episode of The Achievers, learn what really goes into appraising a home beyond what Zillow will tell you, what makes an appraisal hard to place, and the power of direct communication.    Quotes “Do you find that a big part of your effort is to make lenders know that you exist and they have a choice?” (1:28-1:33  | Dax) “I can assure you if my phone rang during this interview, and it were an appraiser, or a homeowner, or a client, this owner of the company would be picking it up.” (6:08-6:17 | Rob) “We specialize in hard-to-place appraisals .”(8:17-8:21 | Rob) “We have a lot of fun. We try to make appraisals fun and sexy. Why not? It’s a very interesting niche of the world that we operate in.”(18:58-19:10 | Rob)   Links Think Tank AMC Apply to be on The Achievers show   Your Host, Dax Hamman Podcast production and show notes provided by HiveCast.fm Digital Marketing by FIRESIDE
Your Legacy Is In Bonnie Faucett’s Hands
Jun 12 2022
Your Legacy Is In Bonnie Faucett’s Hands
A lot goes into building a legacy, and estate planning attorney Bonnie Faucett knows this better than most. Her three successful practices, all of which fall under the umbrella brand, “Your Legacy”, help clients and their lawyers plan their estates in the most inviting, efficient and secure manner possible. At Your Legacy Lawyer, she helps families with children protect their assets. At Your Legacy Drafting, she and colleague Pamela Moss, help other estate planning attorneys get the drafting of estates done for their own clients. Her most recent venture, Your Legacy Architects, provides the software that helps clients compile data easily and securely, so that attorneys can then access the reviewed and approved data to form a draft more easily. Above all, Bonnie is dedicated to educating people about what can be a daunting and sensitive task, and acting as a supportive guide through all steps of the process.  Bonnie realizes that preserving a legacy is about much more than securing money and property. One notable feature of her estate planning practice are the Legacy interviews. In an in-office recording studio, clients are invited to record their stories, not only to maintain the integrity of their plan throughout the changes in life, but so that their memory can be passed down to future generations of their families. On this episode of The Achievers, learn how Bonnie eases technology fears in her older clients, where she gets her boundless energy from, and why it’s important to never stop learning. Quotes “Estate planning is never urgent but it’s highly important.” (2:36-2:38 | Bonnie)“I always found the estate planning element of adulting was a great feeder of procrastination.” (3:18-3:25 | Dax) “My dad did a really good job of passing his legacy down to me and now I’m passing it down to my children.” (6:32-6:37 | Bonnie) “The actual sitting down and drafting of a plan is quite time consuming. And it’s something where if we just have the right information from the attorney, we could sit down and take three to five hours off of their plate to create a deliverable.” (7:16-7:37 | Bonnie) “There’s a need out there for lawyers to have reliable, high-quality help, and that’s a little bit hard to find in the drafting world.”  (8:55-9:03 | Bonnie)“A lawyer implements legacy architects in their own firm, and it becomes a way that they are a standout and they are different from the typical lawyer down the street. We take your data very seriously and we take your experience very seriously.”(13:23-13:34 | Bonnie) “I just don’t want to ever stop learning. (17:44-17:47 | Bonnie)“What I always look for is the one little thing you can take and turn into something big if you start accumulating the impact over time.”(19:46-19:56 Bonnie) Links Bonnie's Your Legacy Lawyer Apply to be on The Achievers show   Your Host, Dax Hamman Podcast production and show notes provided by HiveCast.fm Digital Marketing by FIRESIDE
LAVABOX Is Firing Up The Outdoor Community
Jun 4 2022
LAVABOX Is Firing Up The Outdoor Community
It's hard to imagine LavaBox being created by anyone other than Josh Thurmond. This portable campfire is a nexus of all the passions and purposes that drive his life. As a whitewater rafting guide, Josh stored supplies in military ammunition canisters, or "ammo cans," as the cans are waterproof and indestructible. They were also a constant symbolic presence among the wounded veterans with whom he did philanthropic work. "There's nothing more iconic in the military than the ammo can," he explains. As a volunteer firefighter in Colorado, he witnessed the devastation brought about by fires, and understood the potential danger of combustible materials used to create traditional campfires. A self-described "big tinkerer," Josh combined all of these influences to create LavaBox, a propane-based burner inside of an ammo can, which has been a swift and stunning success in the outdoor space. Crucially, as fire bans continue to be passed throughout the western United States, LavaBox has been enthusiastically recognized by the National Parks Service and the Bureau of Land Management. Further contributing to his philanthropic efforts, one dollar from every sale of LavaBox is donated to Team River Runner, which teaches whitewater kayaking to wounded veterans. Tune in to this episode of The Achievers to hear Josh explain why he eschews social media marketing in lieu of authentic customer testimonials, the importance of a supportive partner, and why it's just as crucial to know when to execute an idea as it is to know when to move on to the next one. Quotes "I wanted something that was easily adopted and felt cool. I think we often overlook how important cool is." (5:30-5:38 | Josh)"I built seven prototypes in about 48 hours–that's how crazy I am. And I got to number seven, and was like, 'I like this one.' And the next day I said, 'All right, I'm gonna make 40 of these.' I sold them in a week, and I said, 'There's something here.'" (7:022-7:39 | Josh)"Smart luck is when someone like you, recognizes that a bit of luck has just come along, and then you really dig in and double down to turn that into something." (8:46-8:55 | Dax)"We have this advantage now where marketing shifted from the glossy and polished expensive video shoot/photo shoot. People now want authenticity. And what's great for a founder like you is that means you don't necessarily have to go spend a whole bunch of money doing photo shoots and video shoots. People with your product, looking at it, using it, taking pictures, taking videos. That does more good than something polished. (22:19- 22:47 | Dax)"In whitewater kayaking, especially at the level I paddle at, you have to believe you're gonna make it. There is no option. A lot of the stuff I paddle, classified plus, especially when I was younger–-there is no option to say, 'I hope I make it.' You can only believe you're going to make it. And about four months ago, I was like, 'You know what? Doubt's a waste of time. We're just going do it.'" (30:02-30:26 | Josh)"I'm not attached to saying, 'I'm only going to make one winner.' I think that happens to a lot of entrepreneurs, especially the people I talk to in my circles right now, they're like, 'This is the one I'm hanging my hat on.' I think that's a huge mistake. I think you gotta stay fresh, keep looking, and stay hungry." (34:12-34:30 | Josh)   Links: LAVABOX  Team River Runner   Apply to be on The Achievers show   Your Host, Dax Hamman Podcast production and show notes provided by HiveCast.fm Digital Marketing by FIRESIDE